The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Ujedinjeno Srbstvo -- May 02, 1923
    Jugoslav Students in Schools of Higher Learning in Chicago

    The Carnegie Foundation issued a booklet: "Directions for foreign students in the U. S. of A."

    Foreigners coming to American higher schools find it difficult on account of difference in educational systems. The purpose of said booklet will be to inform the students how to overcome these difficulties of a different educational system.

    According to statistics there were in the school year 1919-1920 in the higher schools of our U. S. of A. not less than 10,000 students from foreign lands. Most of them are Chinese, about 1,000.

    From Jugoslavia they were as follows:

    (1) From Croatia; 2 in the state of Pennsylvania

    2

    (2) From Jugoslavia; 1 in the State of New York

    (3) From Servia; 24--5 in Florida, 2 in Illinois, 3 in Indiana, 1 in Iowa, 2 in Minnesora, 2 in Nebraska, 1 in Pennsylvania, 2 in South Carolina, 1 in Texas, 5 in Virginia, 4 from Slovenia 18 in the State of Iowa.

    The Carnegie Foundation issued a booklet: "Directions for foreign students in the U. S. of A." Foreigners coming to American higher schools find it difficult on account of difference in ...

    Serbian
    I A 1 a, I C
  • "The Immigrants' Troubles," Scrapbook of D. Popovich -- March 02, 1929
    (No headline)

    The life of our people in America is full of trouble. The immigrants' only refuge from grief is his songs, but he cannot be singing all the time. He has not yet decided what he wants to do, whether to return to the old country or to stay here. If he goes back,- not so good. If he stays here, - not so good either. Our people's eyes are always turned in the direction where the old country lies. That country was the immigrants birth-place, and it reared him. No power exists which can make him forget the old country. On the other hand this country, America, gives him his bread and butter and offers him an opportunity to become independent. So though his feet are on American soil, his heart and his soul are still over there.

    Most of our people are very generous. They have sacrificed much for the old 2country. They have lent a helping hand to their poor friends and relatives over there. They went back to serve as volunteers in the war and contributed money for war-time necessities. They donate large sums of money for everything that is Serbian.

    Our compatriots are known as hard workers and savers. They try their best to save something from their meager pay-checks and send part of it across the Atlantic to their old country banks where it is probably lost. Then some unscrupulous rascals come here and swindle them out of the rest of their savings. And now the depression has come, with lack of work and no more savings. All this has made the Serbian hard-boiled and selfish. Our people have contributed to causes of all sorts, to the church, to education, to benevolent enterprises, until they have nothing left. They have scattered money right and left by handfuls and by sackfuls. Our people have contributed huge sums for conventions 3and annual meetings and have received nothing in return. And right now we have another instance to report. Just a few days ago we received an invitation to be present at a church convention, where, as we heard, our church leaders intend to solicit from ten to twenty thousand for a new bell and building repairs. We should like to know who is responsible for this situation.

    Dushan Popovich.

    The life of our people in America is full of trouble. The immigrants' only refuge from grief is his songs, but he cannot be singing all the time. He has ...

    Serbian
    III G, III C, III H, II D 10, III A, I A 2 c, I D 2 c, I G
  • Scrapbook of D. Popovich -- May 13, 1929
    "Noble Souls,"

    The suffering immigrant should be pronounced a saint.

    Our immigrant cannot stand the cry of his poor relatives in the old country; he is carrying a heavy load in supporting his family, and yet he always finds something to contribute to our numerous organizations. It seems that everybody is eager to exploit his hospitality and his open heart.

    Our immigrant, despite all his hardships, still manages to be a real Christian and support his church. But too much is too much. Before the war we had three priests in America, and now, after the war, we have forty-three. Our church leaders in Belgrade watch carefully that our souls shall be saved, and they export more and more priests. They do not send us writers, professors, teachers, doctors,--in other words, the intellectuals of whom we are so sorely in need. They send only soul-savers, and we are supposed to thank them for this favor.

    Father Zika says, "Watch your soul, for if you lose your soul, you lose everything."

    Socialists and communists say: "Workers work six days a week and rest on 2the seventh day. Priests work only one day a week and rest six days. The rich do not work at all but rest on all seven days of the week."

    This is a free country. Let every man think and live in his own way.

    The suffering immigrant should be pronounced a saint. Our immigrant cannot stand the cry of his poor relatives in the old country; he is carrying a heavy load in supporting ...

    Serbian
    III C, I B 3 c, III G, III H, I E
  • "Serbians in Chicago," Scrapbook of D. Popovich -- September 20, 1929
    (No headline)

    A long time beforemany of us were born, our Serbian immigrants organized a colony in Chicago.

    Many of these immigrants have seen their sons and daughters married and their grandchildren born. The original immigrants are getting pretty old, and these grandchildren of theirs are growing fast. So our present world is built on the younger generation, and many of their elders have lived so long in Chicago that they may rightfully be considered old settlers.

    In some families, father, mother, sons, daughters, grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren were born in Chicago.

    This fact convinces us that our colony in Chicago is the oldest Serbian settlement in America.

    2

    Serbians have centers in all three divisions of Chicago, on the North Side, the South Side, and the West Side. Many of our people have bought their own houses and have become property-owners. All this is admirable but there is another part of the picture which we do not like.

    Serbians in Chicago lack many things. They do not have schools, recreation halls, libraries, or a place where they may gather and relax.

    All our meetings, concerts, lectures, etc. are held on rented premises.

    Our people in Chicago have a 'builders' committee. This committee has been in existence, at least on paper, for many years. We have hopes that it will soon display some sign of life and so we will continue to be patient a little longer. If the committee continues to sleep, the younger generation will ask the older: "Were you ever young?"

    A long time beforemany of us were born, our Serbian immigrants organized a colony in Chicago. Many of these immigrants have seen their sons and daughters married and their grandchildren ...

    Serbian
    III G, II B 1 a, II B 2 g, I B 3 c, I B 3 a
  • Pravda -- July 03, 1930
    Jugoslav Club in Chicago

    Our greatest ideal of strong unity among Serbians, Croatians and Slovenes never has been accomplished. It seems that the cement which we need to bring complete unity was lacking, and it was mutual understanding between not the race, but different classes. This grave problem at least was solved, as it concerns Chicago colonies, by organizing a Jugoslav club, which has just recently opened the door to members and friends, and is already showing noticeable progress.

    The first meeting, which the organized group held in the Morrison Hotel, brought a great number of our people. We are happy to advise our people that as far as we can remember, there was not a single occasion where people of different social, business, or professional standing met together, as it was seen on this meeting of the Jugoslav club.

    Doctors, engineers, priests, businessmen small and big, common laborers, etc., all united by the great problem of national unity, mixed together and showed most desirable equality.

    2

    The main object of this club, as we already announced, is promotion of national unity, but as we have been informed, the club will have quite a large activity in the way of organizing our groups in the way of financial, political, educational cooperation.

    Ugljeska Pupich, Secretary.

    Our greatest ideal of strong unity among Serbians, Croatians and Slovenes never has been accomplished. It seems that the cement which we need to bring complete unity was lacking, and ...

    Serbian
    I C, III B 2
  • Pravda -- July 03, 1930
    Celebration of Vidov-Dan in Chicago

    Every year, for generations, we Serbs and Montenegrins celebrate our national holiday Vidov-Dan. This year, as usually, the celebration was held on June 29. All proceeds will be turned to the treasury of our church for a new church building. Vidov-Dan has a sad memory in our hearts. On this date in 1389 we lost our kingdom and on the same date, a few centuries after, we established our free country, when two of our enemies, Turks and Hungarians, lost their kingdom.

    After the church rites, all people present formed a long procession, with a band playing and a choir singing national tunes. Thousands of people joined this procession on its way to Viker Park Hall, where the official celebration was progressing with a dinner and special entertainment. Plenty of money has been collected for the church fund. Our singing society 'Branko Radichevich' sang many songs to everybody's delight.

    Every year, for generations, we Serbs and Montenegrins celebrate our national holiday Vidov-Dan. This year, as usually, the celebration was held on June 29. All proceeds will be turned to ...

    Serbian
    III B 3 a
  • Calumet Evening American -- September 11, 1933
    in the Scrapbook of Adam Popovich. Jugo-Slavs Plan Festival

    The Jugo-Slav Unity Day committee, which is arranging for the celebration of the fifteenth anniversary of the Jugo-Slav union, will meet at the Hamilton Club on Monday evening.

    Subcommittees will be named to arrange for church services in the Jugo-Slav parishes, for the banquet which will be given at the Hamilton Club, and for the concert and dance that will follow.

    Professor Alexander Savine is arranging the musical program, on which artists of world-wide operatic fame will appear.

    The Jugo-Slav minister to the United States, Dr. Leonid Pitamic, will speak at the banquet. John R. Palandech is chairman of the committee.

    The Jugo-Slav Unity Day committee, which is arranging for the celebration of the fifteenth anniversary of the Jugo-Slav union, will meet at the Hamilton Club on Monday evening. Subcommittees will ...

    Serbian
    III B 3 a, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a, III H
  • United Serbians -- March 20, 1934
    Dedication of Church Banner

    It is a very seldom practiced custom for our colonies to dedicate church banners.

    In the early part of our colonial life this custom was observed, but later it became a rarity. Church banners are emblems of Serbian religious unity. But nowadays you hardly can see those banners carried out of the church.

    Banner-carriers usually were selected from the ranks of highly respectable members in the colony, and it was considered as a sign of high respect and honor to be a banner-carrier.

    Serbians in Chicago, through many efforts and sacrifices, became the proud owners of the most beautiful church in America, and on Sunday, March 11th, with joy and happiness had a pompous ceremony, the dedication of the new church banner.

    2

    This banner was donated by Mrs. Helen Schysler, who is of German descent but through her marriage has become a devoted member of our church. This banner has been made from very expensive material and represents a beautiful piece of artistic work.

    The dedication took place in a particularly pompous church ceremony, with hundreds of Serbs present.

    Rev. Styachich made a very interesting speech, explaining the meaning of this banner and ceremony.

    A banquet held in the church hall followed the dedication ceremony. Members of the church showed great enthusiasm about the restoration of this almost forgotten custom, still dear to their hearts. Chairman of this banquet was Simo Shakota, president of the church organization.

    The Serbian banner is the emblem of the people's struggle, bloody fights and suffering. Through centuries the Serbs have been fighting for their 3liberty and national unity, always carrying around the banners which they collected from rebellious fighters. Now when their ideal is fulfilled, the banners are stored in churches, and stay as the memory of a very sad past, a silent monument to national heroism.

    (Signed) Simo Shakota.

    It is a very seldom practiced custom for our colonies to dedicate church banners. In the early part of our colonial life this custom was observed, but later it became ...

    Serbian
    I B 4, III C
  • [Association documents] -- December 09, 1934
    From Memorial Book, "Serbian Singing Society, Karageorge."

    If there were a nation of which it can be said that it sings morning, noon, and night, undoubtedly that would be the Serbian nation. Ever since migrating down to the Balkan Peninsula, the ancestors of the Serbian people of to-day started their very life with singing. Whether it was while offering a sacrifice to the deity of that time, or from joy at the birth of an heir to the family, or any other significant event in their lives, they sang always! Even during the period of five centuries of life in slavery under the Turkish yoke, the song never left the lips of those brave southern Slavs, who, even in moments of tragedy, found singing their only consolation. And therein lies the answer to the world-famous, limitless treasure of Serbian national folklore, of which so highly spoke the great Goethe, the famous Grimm Brothers, and many other noted writers of the world.

    Guslar, with his one string instrument gusle, sang the songs of heroism, of bravery, of sublime sacrifices undergone by his forefathers and even by his contemporaries.

    2

    And even at the present time when symphonies and choirs of the world delight and awe highly polished audiences, the old bard, Guslar, can still move the hearts of the Serbian people to tears, listening to the sad, heart-rendering tales of bravery and sacrifices on Kosovo Polje.

    Being among the latest immigrants to this country, the Serbians found other Slavs already settled here, engaged in their livelihood. And what little they carried with them, Serbians brought also their songs, their undying desire to sing.

    And Karageorge is one of the early pioneers in the field of national music.

    What intention the early members had, it has always remained as the prime goal, that is, to spread the Serbian songs in every corner where ever a Serbian soul can be found.

    Twenty-one years ago, while the brave soldiers of little Serbia, under the glorious guidance of the late King Peter Karageorgevich and his equally famous and illustrious son, the late King Alexander Karageorgevich, were led from 3victory to victory, a few Serbians who were among the early settlers met together and the Karageorge Society was born. All these Serbians were from the territory under the political reign of Austro-Hungary, and seeing the famous dynasty of Karageorgevich slowly liberating the enslaved Serbians in the South from under Turkish yoke, they wanted their society to be named Karageorge, in honor of the dynasty which they knew was going to free them, too, from another yoke - that of Austro-Hungary.

    To-day when their fatherland is free, when the famous dynasty of Karageorge is guiding the destinies of their families left behind in Europe, Karageorge members are continuing their singing and their cultural work for the betterment of human education among their own people, and they are continuing to be ambassadors of good will and interpreters of the soul of a new, united nation, Jugoslavia. While in this friendly country, Karageorge members will strive to keep high the ideal that some day all Slavs can come together and fulfil the dreams of poets and the prophecies of many, many centuries.

    In twenty-one years of its existance Karageorge has presented many concerts and many plays with musical background, never with mercenary purposes in mind.

    4

    Due to the length of time and changes, the society has had several teachers. It has had its officials - president, and secretary - changed almost annually.

    If there were a nation of which it can be said that it sings morning, noon, and night, undoubtedly that would be the Serbian nation. Ever since migrating down to ...

    Serbian
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2, II B 2 e, I C
  • [Association documents] -- March 10, 1935
    Memorial Book of the Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich: 30th Anniversary

    The Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich was organized in the year 1905 under the laws of the State of Illinois.

    The purpose of this society is to help their members socially, morally and financially in case of trouble, and especially in sickness. The society pays sick benefits at the rate of $1 per day; also death benefits up to $600. Their accident policy covers injured legs, hands, and almost every part of the human body. For all the above mentioned benefits members are charged only $1.75 per month.

    Besides financial help, this society is well known as the most active society in the colony in propagating culture and education among Serbians in Chicago. During the long period of its existence, the society has organized a great number of concerts, theatrical performances, dances, etc.

    2

    From 1905 to 1921 the society belonged to the former Serbian federation, Sloga. The year 1921 brought the federation Sloga into dissolution, and all of its branches, as for example the society St. George, were facing the problem of forming some other unity or working independently.

    The majority in the society of St. George advocated unity with the Serbian federation in Pittsburg. The minority decided to remain independent and has remained so up to today under the name of "Obilich."

    Only 35 members were left in Obilich after the members split, but in this case the old proverb, "Not quantity but quality is what counts," proved to be right.

    A small number of sincere and willing workers showed great activity and drew not only the sympathy of the Serbians, but also succeeded in enlarging its membership to 180 members. Today the society Obilich is 3known as the richest society in Chicago, and has a capital of $20,000.

    This society also proved the fact that Serbians and Croats can cooperate if good will and honest work prevail, because the society Obilich has a large number of Croatian members.

    A great pride and the future hope of this society is the Youth Organization, which grew rapidly not only in its membership but also in its activities.

    Obilich's youth band, choir, dramatic club, etc. are the cultural part of the Serbian colony on the North Side of Chicago.

    The Serbian Benevolent Society Obilich was organized in the year 1905 under the laws of the State of Illinois. The purpose of this society is to help their members socially, ...

    Serbian
    II D 1, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 1