The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Tropinka (Pathway) -- October 01, 1914
    (Advertisement) Michael Berg's Preparatory School Chicago Six Months Only $15

    New classes in the English language. To speak, read and write English. Six-month course $15 -- Register at once.

    The Progressive Preparatory School

    Director M. Groosenberg

    2058 W. Division

    Those who wish may finish high school. It is possible to learn the English language by correspondence. Write for details.

    New classes in the English language. To speak, read and write English. Six-month course $15 -- Register at once. The Progressive Preparatory School Director M. Groosenberg 2058 W. Division Those ...

    Russian
    II B 2 f, IV
  • Russkaya Pochta -- April 28, 1917
    Lecture of the Russian Socialist Branch

    On April 29, 1917, at the hall of the Progressive School, 1208 N. Hoyne Avenue, S. Kievsky will lecture on the theme: "The Motive Force and the Perspectives of the Russian Revolution."

    On April 29, 1917, at the hall of the Progressive School, 1208 N. Hoyne Avenue, S. Kievsky will lecture on the theme: "The Motive Force and the Perspectives of the ...

    Russian
    I E, IV
  • Russkaya Pochta -- April 28, 1917
    Lecture on War by Michael Berg

    A lecture, "Nationalism and War," under the auspices of the 'Society Zaria,' will be delivered by Michael Berg on May 20, 1917, at the Berg building of the Progressive School, 1208 N. Hoyne Avenue.

    The lecture will begin at 7:30 P. M. After the lecture there will be a free discussion.

    A lecture, "Nationalism and War," under the auspices of the 'Society Zaria,' will be delivered by Michael Berg on May 20, 1917, at the Berg building of the Progressive School, ...

    Russian
    I G, IV
  • Russkaya Pochta -- May 26, 1917
    'Friends of Russian Democracy

    A large Russian organization has been formed whose problems are quite important.

    As it was reported in Russkaya Pochta about a month ago, a meeting of the newly organized 'Society for the Aid to the Russian Revolution' was held at the Sherman Hotel. The aim of this society was originally to help the Soviet of workers and soldiers deputies. At the above mentioned meeting a secession occurred because of a difference of opinion. At this meeting the majority of those present did not agree with such a program. The group of members who insisted on the original program, feeling insulted, left the hall of the session. After this a commission was appointed for the working out of plans of further action of the society. The next session was held May 15, 1917, at the 2Sherman Hotel, under the chairmanship of M. Polack. The report of the commission was read by Mr. Berg, and the following points were accepted:

    1. The aim of the society is in every way to help the revolutionary movement in Russia.

    2. The society has the aim of furnishing in America true light on the real situation in Russia.

    3. The society's aim is to help as much as possible, both economically and morally, the liberated political exiles and prisoners.

    4. The society has the aim of assisting Russians in America who desire to perfect themselves in different trades and professions, so that they may apply their knowledge and ability in Russia.

    3

    5. From now on the society will carry the name of Druziya Russki Democratii (Friends of Russian Democracy).

    6. In principle, it was decided, the society will be non-partisan.

    Forty-two persons joined the society. Discussion of many important questions, problems and aims of the society, as well as the election of the board, were postponed until the next session on account of the late hour.

    The secretary protem of the society is Dr. H. R. Krasnow.

    A large Russian organization has been formed whose problems are quite important. As it was reported in Russkaya Pochta about a month ago, a meeting of the newly organized 'Society ...

    Russian
    I E, I C, IV
  • Russkaya Pochta -- July 27, 1917
    On the Anniversary of the Magazine Domashni Vrach (House Physician)

    Dr. R. Krasnow is a pioneer in popularization of medical science among the members of the Russian colony in America.

    (1) He was first to give popular lectures to the Russian organization;

    (2) first to write articles on popular medicine for the Russian press, and, finally, (3) he is the initiator of the magazine Domashni Vrach, the anniversary number of which was just published. The first anniversary! A year of publishing! In order to judge the work which has to be done at the beginning of the publishing of a Russian magazine in America, one must at least have tried to do it himself. We know the hard labor of the initiator of the magazine and we greet the successful results of his work. We congratulate him on the anniversary of the founding of the magazine; we give our Russian thanks to the editors of the Domashni Vrach, and 2especially to Dr. Krasnow, for the irreproachable work done by this lone medical light which serves the Russian colony in America. It is our special pleasure to note in our paper the merits of Dr. Krasnow for the benefit of the Russian colony, because he has been so kind as to become our collaborator, beginning with the next number of our paper. From the next number on, in the pages of the paper Russkaya Pochta will be printed a medical section under the guidance of our honorable Dr. A. Krasnow.

    Dr. R. Krasnow is a pioneer in popularization of medical science among the members of the Russian colony in America. (1) He was first to give popular lectures to the ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 2, IV, II D 3
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- August 15, 1917
    The Russian Mission in Chicago

    The author says that as a storm at sea brings to light the mud, so the revolution in Russia brought up the slime and dirt. This was true in Chicago. The arrival of the Russian mission in that city brought all the hidden dirt to the surface.

    It began with the local "progressive" Russian newspaper. Upon the extraordinary occasion of the Mission's arrival an extra number (selling for three cents) was published, containing outrageous declarations.

    The contents? In addition to such criminal statements, portraits of 2members of the mission, a portrait of Kerensky and under it, "Pray for Kerensky," and an explanation of why prayers were needed. On the first page there was a fictitious list of organizations joining in the greeting. In this list was the Lithuanian Section of the Socialist Party No. 138, and the City Central Committee of the Socialist Party. These bodies took no part in the greeting. The City Central Committee not only did not take part, but decided to ask all Socialists to refrain from participation in any committees organizing the welcome. Further in the paper there were printed a number of eulogies of the Mission and the Provisional government.

    The ignorance of the church paper of the Independents was characteristic. They inserted several welcoming paragraphs.

    Now about the Russian meeting. The initiators of the meeting did their best to attract the revolutionary organizations but failed. They lined up only the "bund" (Ed. Note: Jewish Social Democratic Organization in 3Russia) and the groups of the Organizational Committee of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers Party, whose sole activity had been agreeing to send delegates to various conferences. The Jewish section of the Socialist Party agreed to take part in the reception only if the other sections of the party took part. The organizers held a meeting "in the name of the revolutionary and progressive organizations," not mentioning the churches and reactionary organizations which also took part.

    The meeting took place on Saturday, August 4, 1917, in the Auditorium Theatre. The theatre was decorated with red cloth and revolutionary placards. There was a large American flag, the Russian national tricolor and red flags. There were many police present. The president was Comrade Berg.

    "In the name of the revolutionary and progressive organizations" he 4greeted the Russian Mission and spoke about freedom, ideals and exile. Then he proposed a standing tribute to the fighters for liberty. All stood. The orchestra played the funeral march and the Bund's revolutionary song. The whole auditorium laughed boisterously. The president again spoke of the revolution, freedom, etc. He accidentally mentioned "peace" and the auditorium resounded with cries of "Hurrah for peace" and loud applause.

    In the name of the group of the Organizational Committee of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers Party Comrade Khinoy greeted the Russian mission and asked them to convey comradely greetings to the Temporary Government and the Soviet of Workers and Soldiers Deputies. He tried to assure the (Russian) bourgeoisie that they need not seek foreign markets, and then stated that Russia needed peace. For this reason the democracy supports the Temporary government in its efforts to secure peace. Again arose the cry, "Hurrah for peace."

    5

    Comrade Mills spoke for the Bund. He said that the Bund had always, even during the time of pogroms, believed in the victory of socialism. The Bund believed that "the liberation of the Russian people will be the liberation of the Jewish nation" and that democratic Russia would be "our Palestine." Again the orchestra played the Bund song when he had finished.

    "A slight misunderstanding" arose when the representative of the Lithuanian Workers' Soviet, Mr. Jurgelionis, spoke. All speeches had been censored. Mr. Jurgelionis had submitted his speech also. But he spoke about things not in his prepared manuscript. He greeted the Mission on behalf of the Lithuanian proletariat. When he said that the Lithuanian proletariat would continue to fight the Roman-Catholic priests and landowners, the president pointed out that there were several 6priests present. A denunciation of the exploiters of the proletariat in other countries led to an attempt by the president to hush him, but without success. The speaker said that the key to peace was in the hands of Russia. (Great applause.) Then Erin and Orlovsky, representatives of the non-partisan organizations, spoke. There was some misunderstanding regarding Orlovsky's remarks.

    Bakhemetiev greeted the meeting in the name of Russia. He avoided mention of recent events in Russia. (Ed. note: Probably the July Days of 1917.) Professor Lomonosov, of the Mission, likewise avoided this subject.

    There were distributed at the meeting handbills, About War and Peace and Izvestiya of the Conference of Russian Socialist Organizations for Aid to the Russian Revolution.

    M. Skromnyi.

    The author says that as a storm at sea brings to light the mud, so the revolution in Russia brought up the slime and dirt. This was true in Chicago. ...

    Russian
    I E, IV
  • Russkaya Pochta -- November 30, 1917
    Note about the Play

    On November 4, 1917, a play was arranged for the benefit of the Russian prisoners of war, which was successfully performed. In spite of the large expenses of this undertaking, which amounted to $380.85, after covering all the expenses there was $404.26, net profit.

    The big Walsh's Hall was overcrowded with visitors. The representative of the Russian civil authorities, the consul-general, Mr. Volkov, also took a very active part in this charitable enterprise. Mr. Volkov during one of the intermissions of the play made a short speech from the stage, in which he characterized the unbearably distressing conditions of life of the Russian prisoners of war in Germany and Austria. In conclusion Mr. Volkov called on all present to contribute for this unfortunate sufferers, after which he himself, together with others, began to collect contributions from the visitors with hats. The hat collection gave a sum of $110.

    Board of Directors of the Russian Club Znaniye.

    On November 4, 1917, a play was arranged for the benefit of the Russian prisoners of war, which was successfully performed. In spite of the large expenses of this undertaking, ...

    Russian
    II D 10, IV
  • Russkaya Pochta -- January 18, 1918
    Two Lectures on Russia

    On January 26, 1918, there will be given at the hall of Berg's School (corner Hoyne and Division) a lecture on the following subject: "Elements of the Russian Revolution." The lecture will begin at exactly 7:30 P. M.

    On January 27, 1918, at 2:30 P.M., Hull House (Bowen Hall), another lecture will take place, "The Role of the Bolsheviki in the Russian Labor Movement." Dr. Rovin, the lecturer, has come specially to Chicago to give these two lectures.

    The lectures are sponsored by the Russian branch of the Social-Democratic Party. Admission 10 cents.

    On January 26, 1918, there will be given at the hall of Berg's School (corner Hoyne and Division) a lecture on the following subject: "Elements of the Russian Revolution." The ...

    Russian
    I E, IV
  • Russkoye Slovo -- June 30, 1919
    Krasnow Scrapbooks Russians in America; Letters and Correspondence; Who Will Lift the Veil from This Mystery?

    This article, signed V. M-in, challenges "the oscillating little paper in Chicago Svobodnaya Rossiya on its about face from a Menshevik to a Bolshevist paper.

    The writer begins by wondering who directs the destinies of Russia in leading her over sloping planes. These troubled reflections originate in a letter from Russia (from an American correspondent) about the man Shatov, who is in the limelight in the USSR, who is making statements on behalf of the proletariat, that the proletariat will fight to a finish, etc.

    2

    The writer remembers Willie Shatov, who was quite often tipsy and in this condition depended on the support of the Chicago lamp posts.

    And now this American correspondent demonstrates the paradise for working men and peasants in Russia through Shatov, the indigent drunkard who is at the top now.

    The writer finds solace in the assumption that the correspondent really did not intend this stuff for the Russians here, who know better, who know that the factories in Russia are at a standstill, and half of the soil untilled.

    But what he is after is to find out by what means did ambassador Martens so completely bewitch Svobodnaya Rossiya, whose editor, an erstwhile Menshevik, "turned around and was changed" into a Bolshevik.

    3

    The writer finishes his reflections with a rather unequivocal insinuation that "times are hard." "Everything is high, and one encounters all sorts of difficulties."

    It would, therefore, seem that he is now quite satisfied to have solved the riddle: the editor was bought.

    This article, signed V. M-in, challenges "the oscillating little paper in Chicago Svobodnaya Rossiya on its about face from a Menshevik to a Bolshevist paper. The writer begins by wondering ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1, I E, IV
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- March 16, 1923
    (Adv.) Show, Concert, and Dance for the Benefit of Huncry Orphans in Russia Arranged by the Russian Cooperative Restaurant

    With the Participation of the Conference of Russian Labor Organizations for Relief to Famine-Stricken Russia.

    March 18, 1923, in the Schoenhofen Hall.

    2

    Program of the Show.

    The Dramatic Society "Rampa" will stage:

    (1) "The Daviser of Mischief," the dramatization of a story by Chekhov.

    (2) "Surgery," the dramatization of a story by Chekhov.

    (3) "Russian Chastushki" (Popular ditties).

    (4) The artists Kopelevich - Luganov and A. Pokatilov will appear on the stage in the dramatization of some scenes from Pushkin's poem "Grigoriy Otrepyev and Pimen."

    Program of the Concert.

    (1) A quartet of artists of the Russian Opera, in national costumes.

    (a) "Zachem Tak Daleko?" ( "Why So Far?").

    (b) "Ey Ookhnyem" ("The Song of the Volga Boatmen").

    (c) "Shapchishchi" ("Big Caps").

    (d) "Ty Vzoydi Solntse Krasnoye" ("Rise, O Beautiful Sun").

    (e) "Tai Nema Hirsh Ni Komu" ("There Is No One Who Suffers More").

    (f) "Raz Priyshov Na Povechernitsu" ("Once I Went to a House Party").

    (g) "Vanka Tanka."

    (2) Duet, "Prosti Menya, Prosti" ("Forgive Me, Forgive")-------Messrs Dylov 3and Mamonov.

    (3) Solo, "Dva Grenadyera" ("The Two Grenadiers")V. Dylov.

    (4) Solo, "Ty Moyo Ootro" (Thou Art My Morning")V. Andrievsky.

    (5) Solo, "Song of the Varyag Guest"B. Godunov.

    (6) Solo, "Dunka i Tanka"V. Mamonov.

    (7) United Russian National Chorus, conducted by M. Vorobiyev, with participation of artists of the Russian Opera, will sing "The Internationale" and "Ey, Doobinushka" ("Hey, Bludgeon").

    (8) Violin solo by the violinist of the Imperial Theaters--A. Kaminsky.

    (9) Comic dances V. Mamonov,

    (10) Declamation by the artist Kopelevich-Luganov.

    (11) String Orchestra of the Musical Society "Lira," conducted by V. Sholy.

    (12) Trio Messrs, Brusko, Tsybulya, and Matveychik.

    (13) Ditties and dances V, and J. Sholy.

    (14) Russian Independent Circle of Mandoline Players, conducted by Mr. Popov.

    Beginning at 4 P.M. sharp.

    tickets can be purchased in advance for 60 cents, or for 75 cents at the entrance to the hall.

    4

    All the net proceeds will be used for the relief of hungry orphans in Russia.

    With the Participation of the Conference of Russian Labor Organizations for Relief to Famine-Stricken Russia. March 18, 1923, in the Schoenhofen Hall. <a name="p2" class="page-break">2</a> Program of the Show. The ...

    Russian
    II D 10, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, III B 2, IV, I D 2 b, III H