The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- January 09, 1877
    Annette Essipoff

    Artists who are not preceded by their fame, gerecrally find themselves in a difficult position toward the public. They must at first captivate their audience. Mastery of instruments is not any longer rare today, and the public must be convinced that the artist is a master before it is willing to hear him.

    It is not surprising under surprising those circumstances, that the concert given last night in the now Chicago theater, by the Russian pianist, Mme. Annette Essipoff, did not draw a large crowd, but there were a great number of piano teachers in the audience.

    Mme. Annette Essipoff is an excellent pianist and is certainly not inferior to Alice Topp or Anna Heslig. She played to perfection the Andante and the Impromptu from: "Rose wade" by Schubert, as well as Schumanns's "Traumeswirren" and "Les doux Alouettes", a composition by her husband, Director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory of Music.

    The public awaited with special interest her interprotation of Chapin. Her requtation to be the best interpreter of this composer does not seem to us to be justified. Her playing lacks the necessary power to render the stormy ideas of Chopin.

    2

    Mrs. Essipoff lived up to the expectations of her audience. The only thing lacking seemed to be power, and this was perhaps due to the almost empty hall.

    Artists who are not preceded by their fame, gerecrally find themselves in a difficult position toward the public. They must at first captivate their audience. Mastery of instruments is not ...

    Russian
    III H, II B 1 a
  • Lietuva -- December 09, 1910
    [For the Defense of Fedorenko]

    A meeting for the defense of Fedorenko was held in Chicago, December 4, at the Walsh Hall, Milwaukee Avenue and Noble Street. About 2,500 Russians and Jews assembled. The most important speakers were J. Czaki, H. Anielewski, and H. Altschuler.

    Federenko, a Social Democrat who was formerly a Representative in the Duma, is under arrest in Canada and attempts are being made to give him up to the Russian government. The Russian government accuses Fedorenko of murder and, if he is given up, he might be hanged. It is because of this that the defense meetings are being held.

    A meeting for the defense of Fedorenko was held in Chicago, December 4, at the Walsh Hall, Milwaukee Avenue and Noble Street. About 2,500 Russians and Jews assembled. The most ...

    Russian
    II D 7, III H
  • [Miscellaneous] -- March 24, 1917
    Miscellaneous Material owned by Mr. Fitel Kogan: Society for Aid to Political Exiles and Prisoners in Russia to Comrades and Sympathizers

    The Chicago Society for Aid to Political Exiles and Prisoners in Russia extends to you, comrades, brotherly congratulations on the great events in our native land.

    With a feeling of indescribable joy this society greets you in the days when the great aims of those whom the society considered it a duty to assist, is beginning to materialize.

    Overfilled with love and with loyalty to its best sons, the nation which is just barely beginning to lift its head, became imbued with the obligation of freeing from prisons and from exile the fighters. And in the jubilant shouts from the nation who has raised its head, also in the manifesto of the provisional government, before all else, 2have been heard the stern words: Full amnesty for all political prisoners. These obligations of the nation for them were not incidental.

    Under heavy jail locks, in irons, and under terrific guard have been held those who, by endless sacrifices of freedom, life and health, have, over a stretch of years, been teaching the nation those concepts with which it has now ventured out.

    The workingmen and soldiers of Petersburg and of Moscow, they who overthrew the autocrat and the autocratic clique, have, in all their demands, repeated only the same slogans for which the fighters have paid so dearly.

    The Society for Aid to Political Exiles and Prisoners in Russia extends its greetings to you, comrades and citizens of our native land. It greets you and fraternally congratulates you on the eve of liberating 3our fighters, on the eve of the great revolution with the approaching of a great bright future for our country, in whose history our glorious, brave fighters, through trials of imprisonment and exile, have long since written in shining pages of heroism.

    The Chicago Society for Aid to Political Exiles and Prisoners in Russia extends to you, comrades, brotherly congratulations on the great events in our native land. With a feeling of ...

    Russian
    I E, III H
  • Russkaya Pochta -- April 28, 1917
    Concerning the Accusations against the Russian Colony (Editorial)

    On the pages of the Saturday is sue of the Daily News, one of the large Chicago newspapers, there appeared a notice containing a very serious accusation against the Russian colony of Chicago.

    The statement is made that in the radical circles of the Chicago Russian colony there are many persons hired by the German government who, being controlled by that government, openly make propaganda among the Russians for the idea of a separate peace with Germany.

    The influence of this propaganda is so destructive, so it is said further in the notice, - that it is to be considered as a greater danger, a greater harm than explosions of munition plants producing munitions for Russia.

    Information about this propaganda, says the newspaper, has been 2received from the local Secret Service and from one "Russian revolutionist" who visits all Russian meetings....

    We consider it to be our duty to answer this notice, because it throws discredit on the Russian immigrants of Chicago in the eyes of the American public, and because it disfigures the truth. We want to discuss briefly the question as to whether it is true that an energetic propaganda in favor of a separate peace with Germany is being carried on in the Russian colony of Chicago.

    In as far as we have been able to make observations in our multifarious contact with representative members of the Russian colony at public and private meetings, the voices advocating a separate peace with Germany are so feeble and insignificant that they do not attract 3anybody's attention. There is no need of talking about any energetic activities directed towards this aim. It is sufficient to point out the fact that not a single meeting advocating a separate peace has been held, nor has a single Russian pamphlet of such a character been published.

    On the contrary, we observe just the opposite. The overwhelming majority of the Chicago Russians hate the German government to such an extent, because of its cruel way of conducting the war, that any talk about the necessity of concluding a separate peace with Germany arouses only protest and indignation in the heart of every Russian.

    We believe that if an inquest would be made as to this subject in the Chicago Russian colony, the result would be a most unfavorable one for Germany.

    4

    On the other hand we think that if it had been proved that certain members of the Chicago Russian colony are agents of the German government, such persons would have fared very badly. And this is easily understood.

    The Russian colony in America lives at the present time by the same things which are the vital issues in Russia.

    And Russia, by the mouth of even its most radical representatives, such as Chkheidze, Tsereteli, Kerensky, the Social-Revolutionary Party and the Soviet of Workmen's Deputies, - has declared itself decisively against a separate peace with Germany.

    On the contrary, Russia has resolved to continue the war "until the policy of the German government towards all countries is changed."

    5

    This view has been expressed quite recently by the Zemlya i Volya (Land and Freedom), organ of the Russian Social-Revolutionists.

    On our own behalf we may add the following: there can be no talk about a separate peace with Germany as long as German militarism remains such a terrible threat to all European states; as long as free Russia is threatened by an invasion of the monstrous German army; as long as Germany will not renounce the predatory, grabbing policy towards all the nations involved in the present war.

    We are sure not to be mistaken if we say that all the Russian colony will support this our view. As far as we know, even the most extreme internationalists are in favor of provoking a revolution in Germany in order that the war would be stopped. Even they do not talk a bout a separate peace with Germany.

    On the pages of the Saturday is sue of the Daily News, one of the large Chicago newspapers, there appeared a notice containing a very serious accusation against the Russian ...

    Russian
    I G, I C, III H, I E
  • Russkaya Pochta -- April 28, 1917
    The Departure of Political Emigrants to Russia.

    At the beginning of this week 50 persons, political emigrants, left Chicago for Russia.

    The next party of political emigrants will leave Chicago at the beginning of the month of May.

    At the beginning of this week 50 persons, political emigrants, left Chicago for Russia. The next party of political emigrants will leave Chicago at the beginning of the month of ...

    Russian
    III G, III H, I E
  • Russkaya Pochta -- June 16, 1917
    Resolution of the Russian-Ukrainian Massmeeting

    On June 3, 1917, a massmeeting of the Russian-Ukrainians in Chicago took place, and the following resolution was made:

    "Taking into consideration the successfully achieved Russian revolution, we, Russian and Ukrainian peasants and workers, unanimously resolve: (1) The expression of thanks to all fighters for Russian liberty and the wish of a successful restoration of peace and order in a free country. (2) The expression of full confidence in the provisional government, insisting on a victorious outcome of the war in order, once and for all, to put an end to militarism. (3) To give to all nationalities inhabiting Russia freedom on the basis of autonomy. (4) The confiscation in favor of the people of all the natural riches and a just distribution of such.

    2

    (5) The return to the parishioners of all Russian church property appropriated by the bishops. (6) Dismissal of all former tsarist officials, consuls, and representatives in America and their replacement by representatives of free Russia. (7) The taking of measures against the Russian clergy, which agitates against the new people's government and for the restoration of monarchy in Russia. (8) The confiscation in favor of the people of all the property received as a reward for service to the former tsars. (9) Prohibition of the sale of liquors. (10) Russia should be a democratic republic. (11) The introduction of obligatory general education for the people. (12) The expression of deep thanks to the American republic, which has taken under its protection all Russians who suffered from the former tsarist regime."

    The present resolution was worked out after a grand manifestation in 3honor of liberty and unanimously accepted by the Russian-Ukrainian massmeeting, and it was resolved to send it immediately to the Russian State Duma.

    Note: This resolution is an expression of the public opinion of the progressive part of the Russian colony in Chicago, which was hostile to the tsarist regime. In general one could safely say that almost the whole Russian colony was supporting at that time the Provisional government of Kerensky, with the exception of a small number of persons who belonged to different political movements more to the left than the government of Kerensky. This resolution reflects the frame of mind of the great majority of Russians in Chicago. N. K.

    On June 3, 1917, a massmeeting of the Russian-Ukrainians in Chicago took place, and the following resolution was made: "Taking into consideration the successfully achieved Russian revolution, we, Russian and ...

    Russian
    I E, III H, I G, I B 1, I A 1 a
  • Russkaya Pochta -- June 30, 1917
    The First Social Undertaking of the Russians.

    The sum assigned and expenditures for the political emigrants made by the consul in Chicago: Credit for the first party $8,000.00 34 persons left. Expenditure $6,733.40, plus $500.00 for the New York Anarchists.

    Credit for the 2nd party, $10,000.00; 56 persons left. Expenditure $9,696.05. For the 3rd party, credit $25,475.00; 107 persons left (from Detroit 42.) Expenditure $22,022.30. The number of persons leaving 197. It was assigned, $43,475.00; expenditure $38,951.75. Balance is $4,523.25. In spite of the fact that money was left over and on account of the misuse of it the transportation of the political emigrants was cancelled.

    (Ed. Note: The Kerensky Provisional Government enabled to return to Russia at the government expense all those Russians, who had emigrated, because of the persecutions for their radicalism and their revolutionary activities. Nicholas Korecki)

    The sum assigned and expenditures for the political emigrants made by the consul in Chicago: Credit for the first party $8,000.00 34 persons left. Expenditure $6,733.40, plus $500.00 for the ...

    Russian
    III G, III H, I E
  • Russkaya Pochta -- July 14, 1917
    Society of the Russian Engineers of Chicago

    We, a group of engineers from Russia gathered at Chicago, July 6, 1917, filled with joy about the brilliant success of the Russian revolution and the liberation of Russia from the autocratic yoke, send our hearty greetings and congratulations to the Russian Republic and to the great Russian people, as represented by the Russian Provisional government and the Soviets of the Workers and Soldiers Deputies. We firmly believe that the Russian Provisional government, according to the will of the people, is leading New Russia on the path to liberty and progress and, consequently, it should be supported by everyone who has at heart the interests of Russia. Upon considering this question we decided: (1) To organize the Society of Russian Engineers of Chicago and do all what is 2possible for our native country during the time of our sojourn in America; (2) To communicate to the Russian Provisional government the hearty desire of everyone of us to return to Russia at the first call in order to serve the common cause with our knowledge and experience.

    The President of the Society,

    Engineer Prilla

    2641 Crystal St.

    Chicago, Ill.

    We, a group of engineers from Russia gathered at Chicago, July 6, 1917, filled with joy about the brilliant success of the Russian revolution and the liberation of Russia from ...

    Russian
    I E, II B 2 c, III H
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- August 04, 1917
    Program of Meeting in Honor of Russian Mission

    Chairman, M. (Ed. Note: Michael Borodin) Berg.

    Executive Committee:

    I. Erin M. Khinoy
    M. Fisher H. Kane
    P. Galskis A. Nikolenko
    M. Pollock Dr. H. Krasnow, Secretary.

    PROGRAM:

    Orchestra - "The Marseillaise," "The Star Spangled Banner."

    1. Opening of the meeting by Dr. H. Krasnow.

    2

    2. Address by Mr. M. (Ed. Note: Michael Borodin) Berg, Chairman.

    3. Orchestra - "Funeral March," "The Internationale," "The New Russian Hymn."

    4. Address by Mark Khinoy, representative of the Chicago group of the Russian Social-Democratic Party.

    5. Address by Mr. J. Mill, representative of the United Jewish Labor Party of Lithuania, Poland and Russia (Bund).

    6. Chorus

    7. Address by Mr. K. Yurgelionis, representative of the Lithuanian Council of Socialist and Workers' Organizations.

    8. Addresses by I. Erin and D. Orlowsky, representatives of Russian progressive organizations.

    9. Orchestra - National Hymns of the various nationalities of Russia.

    10. Addresses by representatives of different organizations.

    11. Address by the Russian Extraordinary Envoy

    12. Musical program by Leavitt Brothers' Band.

    3

    The proceeds of the meeting will be used for the benefit of the victims of the Russian revolution and for the Russian prisoners of war.

    Chairman, M. (Ed. Note: Michael Borodin) Berg. Executive Committee: <table> <tr> <td>I. Erin</td> <td>M. Khinoy</td> </tr> <tr> <td>M. Fisher</td> <td> H. Kane</td> </tr> <tr> <td>P. Galskis</td> <td> A. Nikolenko</td> </tr> ...

    Russian
    I E, III H
  • Russkaya Pochta -- August 10, 1917
    About the Reception of the Special Russian Mission

    On Augst 4, 1917, the Russian colony of Chicago met face to face the representatives of free, new, revolutionary Russia. The massmeeting which was arranged by the conference of all Russian organizations of Chicago in honor of the reception of our dear guests was solemn. We Chicagoans proved to be men of better breeding than the New Yorkers; there were no scandals at our meeting and there was not found any place for the uncontrolled passions of the ignorant crowd. A long time before the beginning of the meeting, the public crowded the galleries, balconies and other places within reach of the workers of the Russian colony. The parterre, with its two-dollar seats, which were reserved for the Russian aristocracy - falsely so-called, - was almost empty. The magnificent orchestra of forty persons could not control the incresing enthusiasm and impatience of the public.

    Finally, at 8:30 P. M., the mission was invited by the representatives 2of the local Russian press, A. Pokatilov and N. Klekner, and accompanied by them, it went to the stage of the big Auditorium Theatre. It seemed that there would be no end to the thunder of applause and the roaring of the crowd.

    Speeches by the Representatives of the Colony.

    The meeting was called to order by the secretary of the conference, Dr. H. Krasnow.

    Mr. Berg, the chairman of the evening, was the first to greet the ambassadors of revolutionary Russia on behalf of the Russian organizations of all nationalities of the city of Chicago; Mr. Khinoy spoke on behalf of the group of the Russian Social-Democratic Workers Party; K. Mill gave a speech of welcome on behalf of the Jewish organization "Bund"; K. Jurgelonis made a welcoming talk on behalf 3of the Lithuanian Socialist and Workers organizations.

    Reception of the Special Russian Mission.

    I. Erin delivered an address on behalf of the non-partisan progressive organizations; D. Orlovsky spoke on behalf of the church organizations.

    Speeches by the Members of the Mission.

    The orchestra plays the "Marseillaise." The walls are shaken by stormy ovations. Ambassador V. A. Bakhmetyev greets and congratulates the new, free Russia on behalf of revolutionary Russia. The orchestra plays Gymn Svobodnoy Possii (Hymn of Free Russia; words by the Russian poet K. Balmont). Further, the ambassador recalls our never-to-be forgotten dreams, which are now realized. "The thorny way is passed and we have reached a republican Russia, and we are on the eve of elections to 4to the Constituent Assembly. Only a few months from now, and we will have a Constituent Assembly. We do not have to fight now for what we have already obtained, but to protect it. We should keep and protect the democracy which we have obtained by shedding our blood. We especially must remember it now, when Russia is on the verge of destruction. Remember that we will be responsible for not keeping and protecting our conquests - the conquests of democracy - not only before Russia, but before the whole world."

    Further, the ambassador points out that free Russia should be founded upon the will of the people; should create through its will, and be a strong and organized republic, with the audacity to protect its rights and its country, and should have no place for chaos and disorganization. For that purpose it is necessary to have a revolutionary army, by no means for conquests, but for the protection of liberty. "Let us believe," concludes the ambassador, "in the reasonable organized work of Russia, which will lead the world to liberty and everlasting peace."

    5

    After that the ambassador presents his comrade of the mission, Prof. U. Lomonosov. "Thanks for the touching reception," begins Professor Lomonosov, "not we, but you, are the first representatives of new Russia. All Russians who are present here and others who are scattered in the cities of America - first representatives, untouched source of creative powers for Russia - I bow to you." The speech of this talented orator was beautiful and confident. The orator warns about the danger threatening Russia, owing to the disagreements and strife between various kinds of partisan movements. "From Purishkevich to Lenin all were agreed on this point: that the den of Tsarskaye Selo must be destroyed. Now, when it is necessary to construct a great democracy; when it is necessary to concentrate all our powers on the process of building Russia, we commit a crime by bringing in disorganization and chaos." The speaker reminds that "history is not waiting, that time is going on, that stoppage and confusion in the building of Russia cannot be tolerated."

    6

    "The irrevocable is like death!" The speaker insists on the immediate elimination of discords which ruin Russia. Each and everyone cannot put forth his opinions and his demands. Compromises are necessary. It is impossible to satisfy the ideal of each Russian, i. e., of all the 180 millions of the population. Only the former autocracy dreamed about the unity of the ideal of 180 millions of persons. But the autocracy did not recognize the "living spirit of the human thought: its ideal is the unanimity of the grave!" Lomonosov compares the fate of present Russia with a ship from which a part of the treasures should be thrown overboard in order to save the ship with the passengers and most of the treasures. "The time of discussion has passed," says Professor Lomonosov, "the specter of civil war threatens us! The fate of Russia is in our own hands. Let us prove it to the whole world, that we are citizens, but not slaves!" On account of the great fatigue of the members of the mission and due to lack of time, the meeting was adjourned about 11 P. M.

    7

    Note: The aim of the Special Russian Mission was to bring together economically Russia and the United States; to establish commercial relations with the Provisional government of Kerensky, and to conclude new treaties with them in place of the tsarist treaties. N. K.

    On Augst 4, 1917, the Russian colony of Chicago met face to face the representatives of free, new, revolutionary Russia. The massmeeting which was arranged by the conference of all ...

    Russian
    I E, III H