The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Svenska Tribunen -- May 25, 1892
    Chicago Russians Unite.

    The first Russian congregation of Chicago was organized here a week ago yesterday, May 17th, by members of the local Russian colony and other followers of the Greek-Catholic faith. The name selected for the new organization was the Congregation of St. Nicholas. Those in attendance subscribed toward a fund for the erection of a church building.

    The first Russian congregation of Chicago was organized here a week ago yesterday, May 17th, by members of the local Russian colony and other followers of the Greek-Catholic faith. The ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Svenska Tribunen -- November 09, 1892
    Russians Inaugurate Church Services in Chicago.

    The first Greek-Catholic church service in Chicago was held last Saturday evening, Nov. 5th. at 13 Center Avenue, by a Russian congregation, which as yet is very small in number. The service was conducted by Bishop Nicholas, who is the primate of the Greek-Catholic Church of the United States, with headquarters in San Francisco, California. Some of the priests from other parts of the country attended this initial service. In the morning of the following day, Sunday, High Mass was celebrated in the same place. The premises at 13 Center avenue have been leased by the congregation for one year.

    The first Greek-Catholic church service in Chicago was held last Saturday evening, Nov. 5th. at 13 Center Avenue, by a Russian congregation, which as yet is very small in number. ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Utro (Morning) -- October 16, 1914
    (No headline)

    On September 28 the Most Rev. Bishop Alexander Alaskinsky conducted High Mass in the Chicago Greek-Orthodox Russian Church. The day was warm and clear. Russian immigrants from Chicago and suburbs came in great number to pray with the favorite Father, and to hear from his authoritative lips news from dear homeland. The solemn reception of the bishop was about ten in the morning. At the church entrance, M. Adamovich, church warden, stood in readiness to greet the dear guest with bread and salt. In the simple but sincere words of the warden one heard true joy and pride in the fact that he, as church warden, had the happy lot to greet the great worshiper of the Russian Orthodox Church. Upon entering the church, the local priest met the Domini amidst wonderful singing of the Chicago Orthodox Russian choir.

    No, no other service can surpass a prelate service. Like the emissaries of the Russian Grand Duke Vladimir, I, too, have been in many American churches, and like them, I, too, shall say that nowhere have I seen such beauty, such magnificence, such solemnity, such divine singing, and such resplendent order.

    2

    During services the giant voice of the father archdeacon shook the foundations of the church. A bishop's service is a harmonious combination of something great, solemn, and soulful: The wise and marvelous relationship between the archdeacon's thundering voice and the still, small supplicating singing, which lifts the souls of the worshipers far, far into the heavenly heights where the weary souls find so much solace that they would prefer to hold on forever to those heights, farther away from terrestrial agitations.

    Long will tarry in the soul of the Russian people the memory of that moment when the master gave instruction to the Russian people. Long have been flowing the golden words from the lips of the Russian Domini, but when he began to describe the torments of our mothers and sisters, the fathers and brothers, flung by destiny into far away America (they) could no longer contain themselves and tears of longing after sisters and brothers, who must bear the whole weight of this terrible war, and who must offer up for their country everything that 3is dear to a human being: life, home, freedom, honor, were flowing freely.

    After the service had ended his Eminence desired to conduct evening services in the second Russian church in Chicago, on 44th Street. The parishioners of St. Michael's Church heartily greeted the bishop and gave a beautiful rendition of the good old home prayers.

    On October 1st the bishop conducted services in Gary, Ind., where the Russian colony greeted him enthusiastically.

    (Signed) Ivan Ovsyanitsky.

    On September 28 the Most Rev. Bishop Alexander Alaskinsky conducted High Mass in the Chicago Greek-Orthodox Russian Church. The day was warm and clear. Russian immigrants from Chicago and suburbs ...

    Russian
    III C, I B 4
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- February 18, 1916
    "Fruit of Knowledge" (Club Znaniye)

    Some months ago a new Russian Club was organized in Chicago, and was named KNOWLEDGE (ZNANIYE) its organizer being prelate and the psalm-chanter, Mr. R--ov.

    The fundamental reason or organizing this club was, apparently, the advantage for his holy little business-place, to which the little patriots flocked, and from whom the most honorable Fathers gathered wool.

    The choir for this church was picked from among the club members, who sang very beautifully hymns and songs for a remuneration of kisses, one a-piece, impressed on the forehead by the very Bishop himself.

    One day the little father betook himself with his mission to the nearby suburb Melrose Park, and took his club choir along, to whom it occurred to whip up 2National patriotic feelings by singing "God save the Tsar."

    The listeners began to whistle and to hiss and the singers barely escaped a beating. The choir felt insulted and cleared out. There occurred a second incident, which was even more interesting. These progressive compatriots bethought themselves to give a concert in behalf of refugees, which affair began and ended in true Russian fashion, i. e., in a wholesale drunk--everybody prostrated, "soused," "stewed."

    The collection was large but no account was submitted, although more than a month has passed since the affair.

    One only wonders that our good countrymen, protected by the Russian clergy, singing hymns to the Tsar, should call itself a progressive club!

    Signed,

    Karantinov

    Some months ago a new Russian Club was organized in Chicago, and was named KNOWLEDGE (ZNANIYE) its organizer being prelate and the psalm-chanter, Mr. R--ov. The fundamental reason or organizing ...

    Russian
    III C, II B 2 g, I C
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks Novy Mir -- July 06, 1917
    Owned by Dr. H. R. Krasnow, 4601 N. Broadway, Chicago An Open Letter to the Society 'Friends of Russian Democracy'

    Gentlemen:

    Some time ago, soon after your society had been formed, and in connection with a certain gathering of your society, there appeared in a local paper, the Chicago Daily News, a very provoking article, in which all Russian Socialists combating war were called German agents. In this article it was stated - as per the wisdom of a certain Socialist - that Russian literature against war, Socialist publications in Russian. Russian massmeetings, etc., all this is backed by German funds. It was further stated in the article (as information from 'one who knows') that all the Russian Socialist-Internationalists, whether in Russia or America, are in the service of the Kaiser, and so on.

    2

    Accordingly, the conference of Russian Socialist organizations for aid to the Russian revolution replied to this provoking article, explaining the actual position taken by the Russian Socialist-Internationalists on the question of war.

    I learned recently that the article published in the Daily News was from the pen of a member of your society.

    When that gentleman openly admitted his authorship at one of your society's meetings, your society, I was told, did not take any steps in this matter.

    Is this true?

    Is it true that this gentleman is regarded by your society as a sincere friend of Russian democracy and is still in the ranks of your society's membership?

    3

    Furthermore, at your conference for the organization of a reception for the special mission from Russia, headed by Professor Bakhmetev, you had - among other representatives at the conference - also delegates from three churches, and among these was one from the church on Leavitt Street, where at this time there goes a Blackhundred agitation to restore to power the tsar and the old regime. It is said that Priest Kukulev was there as a delegate from his church, and that you accepted him as a delegate, and you found it possible to discuss with him details of the reception for the mission sent by a revolutionary government.

    Is it true?

    Would you not take the trouble to give an open answer to these questions through Novyi Mir? This question is of interest not to me alone, but to the entire Russian colony of Chicago.

    Yours respectfully,

    M. A. Stolyar

    Gentlemen: Some time ago, soon after your society had been formed, and in connection with a certain gathering of your society, there appeared in a local paper, the Chicago Daily ...

    Russian
    I E, I C, III C
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- October 20, 1917
    Black-Hundred Adventures of Jerome P. Zaishenko Here

    Jerome P. Zaichenko, who was run out of Detroit with a beating is not satisfied, not appeased. For his deviltries the Russian Orthodox Reactionary Mission sent this blustering creature to the Chicago parish on the South Side.

    Here this little father, instead of a sermon last Sunday burst into a storm of invectives against all progressive parishes.

    After services the parishioners just plainly warned the little father that he will be asked to clear out if he again abuses and slanders the progressive parishes.

    (Russian Orthodox Christian)

    Jerome P. Zaichenko, who was run out of Detroit with a beating is not satisfied, not appeased. For his deviltries the Russian Orthodox Reactionary Mission sent this blustering creature to ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- May 10, 1923
    The New Independents

    Up to the present time the only Russian Independents in America were in the Russian Orthodox parishes, which many years ago declared war on the autocratic "most holy" synod and on its officials in cassocks.

    At the head of this movement were the Chicago Independents, who have their church at 917 N. Wood Street.

    In matters of faith they and their priests proved themselves true Independents. They took in their own hands the management of their church property and possessions. They did not permit any interference from above in the inner affairs or in the affairs of their faith. Even the priests were of the parishioners' own choosing in these parishes.

    For this the Independents were often persecuted by adherents of the synod and its candidates.

    2

    But now, of a sudden, also the adherents of the recent synod declared themselves Independents. According to information from New York these humdrum Independents do not wish to recognize the authority of the All-Russian Church Council, and according to this same information, the Russian Orthodox Church in America becomes entirely independent, its management to be in the hands of the members and the clergy, whereas the soviet of bishops, headed by Metropolitan Platon, will be vested with the powers of the most holy synod.

    The reasons that urged Platon and his followers to become Independents are quite obvious.

    The All-Russian Church Council has, by an overwhelming majority, endorsed the government of the Soviets. In addition to this, their patriarch and shepherd, Tikhon, is being tried at present. These circumstances compelled them to turn Independents.

    A. Z.

    Up to the present time the only Russian Independents in America were in the Russian Orthodox parishes, which many years ago declared war on the autocratic "most holy" synod and ...

    Russian
    III C
  • Russkii Viestnik -- March 08, 1924
    Among the Leavitt Street People

    The leaders and members of the Synod Church on Leavitt Street are in a very sad mood. In all the Russian Colony, enforced work is going on in building schools and libraries, in arranging lectures, plays and useful evenings. The colony little by little is getting organized, is learning, and long ago dismissed every thought about returning to the old regime. But the people of Leavitt Street and their leaders still think about the establishment of the throne. "They read the Shanghai paper with the picture of Nicolay Nicolayevich and are glad of the thought that he might become a Tsar."

    The above information about the inhabitants of Leavitt Street just reached us.

    A. Zemetchinsky.

    The leaders and members of the Synod Church on Leavitt Street are in a very sad mood. In all the Russian Colony, enforced work is going on in building schools ...

    Russian
    III C, I C, I E
  • Russkii Viestnik -- May 24, 1924
    On the 12th Anniversary of the Brotherhood of St. George

    How quick twelve years have slipped along! These years have written on the tablets of our memories one fact important for the Russian colony of Chicago of that period.

    Chicago plays a certain role among the Russian-Americans. It is a stormy city. It is the center of the American midlands. It is situated on the main road connecting the Western and Eastern states.

    At the time we are speaking of the tsarist (Note: The author means the Orthodox Mission. D.S.) Mission in America was going to pieces. The heads of the Orthodox Church were shaken; they did not take their duties seriously, they were sinning! They were committing sins of the flesh, "sins of the soul," and "sins of the pocket."

    And they blundered so long that the mission began to exhale a bad odor.

    2

    It was not the odor of incense; it was the stench of the great and small sins of the bishops and the archpriests.

    At the present time the Orthodox Mission is incurably ill. Then it was just falling sick.

    The Russians in Chicago understood this and were stirred up. They revolted against the ugly things that were being done by some of the clergy, and they began to pine for independence from priests who were paid by the government and who committed all kinds of immoral actions.

    And they seceded. They bought a church and a house, and they invited a priest of their own.

    The first independent priest was the Rev. Timothy Pieshkov, who had been recommended by me. He was a lay brother of a Russian monastery, a clever, 3hearty and unsophisticated per on. Now he is finishing a course in the Harvard University in Boston, but then he was a hobo and was tramping about, as many other migratory workers. I remember when at the editorial office of Russkii Golos, I blessed jokingly a group of Russian youths, who were on their way to tramp over America. They were singing and playing guitars, and were cheerful and adventurous children of Russia. Pieshkov was among them. All of them scattered and fell behind, but one, Kallos, went over all America and in the South was jailed for vagrancy. I released him with the assistance of a United States senator.

    Pieshkov had passed the examination for a priest of the Independent Orthodox Church in Chicago. The people themselves examined him at the church.

    The new priest had to perform the divine service and preach a sermon.

    4

    Pieshkov defeated his opponent and became the first priest of the "Independents" and carried out this work. During my trip over Canada and the United States, I visited Chicago. I also was at the house of the Independent (Church), and at their gatherings I talked to them about the life of the Russians in America. I saw that Pieshkov is not intellectually developed, and knows very little; that he must first learn himself if he hopes to teach others. I advised him to visit the school. He is a meditative man. He could not agree with some people; he could not satisfy others. He had to leave the Independents. Now Pieshkov is without a job.

    His work gave its fruit. The Brotherhood of St. George grew up; its members built their own school and parish house, and even founded a paper of their own.

    The brotherhood converted its church into a house of enlightenment. It stopped the existence of an orthodoxy paid by the government, and it 5led its own untrammeled existence. Not a large step forward, but the beginning was made. After the first step many others will follow, still better ones, wiser, and leading to still greater liberty. People are growing and will grow. Let them grow, but let them also think. Thus liberty and thinking will nature and will bear fruit. First a church, then a school, then a newspaper, and ultimately a social brotherhood.

    The Brotherhood of St. George gave the first blow to Orthodoxy, supported by the government. Although the brotherhood was not making much progress at first, still it was moving forward. At present this people manage themselves their religious affairs. Later they will come to science and will not need any religion.

    Father Joann Zheltonoga strives to cultivate among the members of the Independent Society religious faith and loyalty to the church. And the 6newspaper, that good shepherd, instills into the conscience of the masses appropriate facts and thoughts. What we read on its pages makes the impression of continual ups and downs. But there is some movement, new things are undertaken. Things will go still better if the membership of the Independent Society will amalgamate with other Russian organizations. Working together they will widen the field of their activities and improve their life. The Russian colony has visibly grown. These twelve years have served to nurse the brotherhood to develop it, and its members have begun to live better, to warm up, to do their social duties, to become more sensible. This should be a cause for rejoicing for the whole Russian colony of Chicago, for people have emerged out of the darkness into the light, out of dissensions into brotherhood. We greet these people.

    Ivan Okuntsov.

    How quick twelve years have slipped along! These years have written on the tablets of our memories one fact important for the Russian colony of Chicago of that period. Chicago ...

    Russian
    III C, II D 1
  • Russkii Viestnik -- July 16, 1924
    The House of Enlightenment

    This institutions is already in the fifth year of its existence.

    It is known to almost every member of the Russian colony of Chicago.

    In spite of its being so generally known at times one hears strange rumors about it.

    Sometimes one hears that this house belongs to a religious organization, to the Baptists. Some people hold the opinion that the House of Enlightenment belongs to anarchists; others maintain that it is in the hands of monarchists; and some say that it belongs to the communists.

    In the presence of such rumors and opinions, it is difficult for some people to come to any conclusion as to what this institution really is.

    2

    In order to refute all such rumors it is necessary to point to the activities of the House of Enlightenment. This institution wants that its name should be taken in the broadest sense.

    Taking into consideration the very Broad meaning of the word "enlightenment," this institution cannot be considered as belonging to any narrow-minded partisan organization.

    Literally all persons, whatever their political and religious convictions and opinions may be, can be members, visitors, guests, sympathizers and friends of the House of Enlightenment.

    Freedom of thought and conscience is not interfered with by anybody.

    People are allowed to discuss without fear any question that may occur to them, whether they want to do it in the auditorium, or in the club, or just in a private conversation.

    3

    The spirit of brotherhood, equality and freedom - such is the motto of the House of Enlightenment. One who discusses questions with some one who holds antagonistic views, must listen to his opponent without gnashing of teeth. That is the most important part of human education.

    The House of Enlightenment endeavors not only to foster the spirit of mutual respect among men, irrespective of the difference of their views, (but) it also does its best to broaden as much as possible the mental horizon of its members; to give as wide an outlook on the unlimitable field of human life and activities as possible. With this purpose in view, lectures are given in the House of Enlightenment; excursions are arranged, and classes are organized. In order not to leave these statements unsubstantiated, I shall briefly illustrate them as follows:

    During the last two years there have been given at the auditorium of the House of Enlightenment more than 120 scientific lectures. These 4lectures were given by experienced, well-trained persons, sometimes bearing well-known names. It may be interesting to enumerate the persons who have been giving these lectures and the subjects of the latter:

    S. Prokopov has given lectures on the following subjects: Astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology, archaeology, botany, psychology, history (ancient, medieval and modern), history of the development of industry, Darwinism, etc.

    (Note: As far as I know, Mr. Prokopov, who is the writer of this article, is not a well trained specialist in any of the sciences enumerated, nor a graduate of any college. His name should not stand first in a list containing such names as Dr. O. Struve, Professor Gidoni, Professor Popov and others. D. S.)

    Dr. G. Krasnow - on anatomy and physiology.

    5

    Professor Gidoni - on "The Downfall of the Power of the Tsars." (An episode from Russian history).

    Prof. G. Popov - on heredity

    Dr. O. Struve (Russian astronomer) - on "Man and the Universe."

    Dr. Platin - on Biology

    A. Stepanov - on "The Evolution of the Solar System."

    Dr. M. Sahud - on "The Food Elements and Health."

    Dr. M. Volkov - on "The Chemical Elements."

    I. Voronko - on Ethnography

    6

    Professor Braghin (Note: Col. Braghin is meant. D. S.) - on "Einstein's Theory."

    Besides these persons many others have contributed to this long series of lectures. Also about 20 excursions to various noteworthy places have been arranged under the direction of S. Prokopov.

    From all that has been said the reader will understand that the House of Enlightenment is not bound to any narrow religious or political creed.

    On the contrary, its doors are wide open for all political views and religious creeds.

    (Note: Mr. Prokopov does not mention that the House of Enlightenment was founded by the American Church of the Disciples of Christ in order 7to create a center where Russians seeking to improve their educational, moral and spiritual standard, could gather, in some cases even live, use the library and the reading room, attend lectures, etc. Its program was that of all so-called settlements, but it was not intended by its founders to become a center for the propagation of revolutionary and atheistic ideas. Mr. Karl Borders was put at the head of this institution, which has contributed much to the enlightenment of the Russian colony. It could have done even more good if Mr. Karl Borders had not invited assistants who were in sympathy with bolshevist communism and atheism, such as Mr. Yaroslavsky and Mr. Prokopov represented. When the Russian Evangelical Christians of Chicago broke relations with the American Church of the Disciples of Christ, that church liquidated the House of Enlightenment. D. S.)

    This institutions is already in the fifth year of its existence. It is known to almost every member of the Russian colony of Chicago. In spite of its being so ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g, II D 6, III C