The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 07, 1927
    Children's Holiday

    The children's holiday which was celebrated in the Union parish by the Stock Yards was a great success and attracted a great many Russian and Ukrainian residents of that district. The holiday was directed by the Reverend M. Kozinak, who made a speech to the children, stressing the necessity of respect for the older people and parents. Then a choir, consisting of sixty children, directed by Mr. George Tatarov, sung several songs. In conclusion a play, "Saint Nicholas," was performed, and souvenirs to the children were given.

    The children's holiday which was celebrated in the Union parish by the Stock Yards was a great success and attracted a great many Russian and Ukrainian residents of that district. ...

    Russian
    III B 3 b, II B 1 a
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 08, 1927
    Christmas Parties

    The author of the article expresses his opinion about the arrangement of Christmas parties for Russian children and adults, and their aim.

    It is true, the author says, that here in America it is not so easy to excite the interest of the Russian children for the Russian customs and rites. It must be taken into consideration that the children are being brought up in a foreign country, do not know the correct English language, have very little sympathy with their parents and all that is Russian. That is why the parents and teachers of the Russian schools for children must endeavor, when planning the children's holidays and amusements, to inculcate upon their children the Russian rites, habits, and customs. Visiting a certain Christmas party the author noticed that 2the organizers strove to do their best by arranging for the children many amusements, occupying them with gay games and giving them toys and candy. Then the author draws a picture of the condition of Russian children, somewhere on the west shores of the Pacific Ocean, in a half savage country, in a land inhabited by the yellow race of people, where the children are sheltered in dark, cold Chinese phansas (houses). The children are barefoot, without clothes, and hungry, and always in need of a piece of dry bread. "We Russian people," adds the author of the article, "parents, teachers, and trustees of the Russian schools for children in America, striving to give our children the best amusements and pleasures, should not forget the unfortunate children who don't know pleasure and light, and continually live in poverty." The Committee for Aid to Russian Poor Children in Chicago accepts contributions in money, clothes, and shoes.

    The author of the article expresses his opinion about the arrangement of Christmas parties for Russian children and adults, and their aim. It is true, the author says, that here ...

    Russian
    III A, III B 3 b, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, II D 10
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- December 17, 1932
    [A Traditional Observance]

    Every year "Narodniki-Nezavisimtsi" (The Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society), arranges a Christmas tree for the children of their school. The Christmas tree of this Society is a traditional one. If they failed to organize such an event, the holiday of the Nativity of our Lord would appear somehow imperfect, because in this celebration, the children's gayety would be absent.

    We, the adults, for any pretext are apt to arrange an entertainment at any time. But what do we do for the sake of our children? To the children the Christmas tree is their holiday, it is their pleasure and joy. Also the adults recall their own childhood, their native land, Christmas Eve, and the Christmas tree at home, and the long ago joy, and thus relive the event with their children. Do you think that some of us will go back to our native land? Do you hope to celebrate this particularly solemn holiday of the Nativity of our Lord over there again?

    2

    Maybe it would be possible to visit our homes in Russia; perhaps it would be possible to arrange a Christmas tree over there. But could we be children again? No, never! That is impossible.

    This being the case, let us hurry and accept the invitation of the Society to attend their Christmas tree celebration. And there, seeing the joy of the children we can recollect our own past childhood, and thus enjoy this party just as well.

    There will be a very good program of entertainment. Those who will participate will be the clown C. Arrigoni, acrobats from downtown, the violin soloist, N. Arrigoni, the choir of the Independent Church under the direction of V. Shumkoff, a gipsy group, recitations by the pupils of the Independent School, the balalaika orchestra of the Douglas Park School under the direction of A. D. Dobrohotoff, gipsy romances, sung by L. A. Slavina, and a speech of welcome by the very Rev. I. Zeltonoga, the Prior of St. 3George's Church.

    There will be appetizing refreshments for all. Dance until late at night with a first-class orchestra which will play Russian, Polish and American dances.

    The Christmas tree celebration will be held at the Polish Hall, 984-86 Milwaukee Avenue at Augusta Boulevard, beginning at 4 o'clock. The entire proceeds [of the affair] will go for the improvement of the school.

    Every year "Narodniki-Nezavisimtsi" (The Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society), arranges a Christmas tree for the children of their school. The Christmas tree of this Society is a traditional one. If ...

    Russian
    III B 2, III B 3 b, II B 1 a, II B 2 f, I B 3 b, II D 1, III H, V B, I C
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 27, 1934
    In the Shelter of the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society

    The power of any organization is measured not so much by the number of members it may have on its roster as by the potential strength inherent in the quality of its members and in their readiness to respond to the call of their organization.

    Even if we agree with our opponents that our society is not so successful in its work--if, in the words of our opponents, it "has been driven into a blind alley" by the Russian International Mutual Aid Society [Translators note: this is a Communist organization]; then how is it that during our recent Christmas tree celebration there were about two thousand persons present, all members of our organization?

    Everybody knows that a large part of our membership lives outside the city of Chicago, that many members live in other states; despite all this, and despite 2the economic depression and unemployment Union Hall was filled to the walls with the members of the R.I.M.A.S. (Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society) and their families. All of this means that the inner strength of the Independents not only has not "been driven into a blind alley", but has actually increased during these latter years of our struggle for the expansion of our activities. Our organization has become greater and stronger, and shows no signs of growing smaller and weaker.

    The exceedingly important fact is that, among the large crowd present at the Christmas celebration, the younger generation was magnificently represented by a large number of our Russian boys and girls. The gray-haired patriarchs of our colony were also present in goodly numbers.

    There is no doubt that our organization is strong, not only in the quantity but also in the quality of its membership and in the influence it exerts upon the Russian group in Chicago and in other cities.

    3

    Some may say that the Bolsheviks in Chicago draw large crowds to their various doings. Maybe--sometimes. But their affairs are attended not by Russians alone. All groups and individuals, irrespective or nationality who have an "international streak" in them, usually come to all the Bolshevik gatherings; all races, all nationalities, all tongues are there. They are all united in one great idea of remaking the world.....And here in our quarters on Wood street gather the people of one mother, of one race and one tongue, united in one great little idea--not of rebuilding the world but of building and keeping their own little corner of it. The Bolsheviks receive support from all nationalities, and we frequently receive a slap on the face even from our own nationality. In spite of all this, we are able to draw an impressive number of Russian people to our organization. In short, the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society, with all its branches, is the foundation of all Russian community life in Chicago and vicinity. All the better elements of the Russian colony in Chicago, representing almost exclusively the old Russian peasant immigration to America, is grouped around our organization. And all the elements that still float, without sail or 4rudder, in the sea of the Russian colony, should find their haven in the ranks of our organization.

    The life itself earnestly demands that every Russian in America should enter this haven, over which there is a sign: "The Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society. All those who still do not belong to any organization, and all forward-thinking persons, should hurry into the shelter of our society.

    The power of any organization is measured not so much by the number of members it may have on its roster as by the potential strength inherent in the quality ...

    Russian
    III B 2, III B 3 b, III A, III E, V A 2
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 12, 1935
    Christmas Tree

    Tomorrow, at the Amalgamated Auditorium, 333 South Ashland Boulevard, the traditional Christmas tree festivities, arranged by the Independent Mutual Aid Society, will take place. Each Year, without fail, these festivities are staged, and each year, successfully.

    This year, the ceremony promises to be particularly successful and well attended. The day set for the occasion is most appropriate. This week, we celebrated the Russian Christmas, and we all are still under the influence of the holiday spirit. Our thoughts and memories are still with our motherland; we remember the time when we used to enjoy our holidays at home, not in a strange country. For this reason, and quite naturally, we will all want to join the participants on this occasion. The program promises to be very entertaining.

    The parents, as well as the other Russians in Chicago who still love their native land, will have an opportunity to see their youngsters on the stage.

    2

    With joy, they will hear the children's chorus singing the folk songs of their distant homeland. They will see and hear a well-organized, well-directed chorus led by a talented conductor, who loves his art.

    Christmas is a children's holiday. The perennially green fir tree is the emblem of everlasting youth, never-ending life. Names and people change, but life goes on. Some people go, others come to take their places.

    Every year, members of the Independent Society, from Chicago and neighboring towns, gather for this occasion. They bring their children from Argo, Pullman, Melrose Park, from north and south. They gather together to celebrate Christmas.

    Tomorrow, at the Amalgamated Auditorium, 333 South Ashland Boulevard, the traditional Christmas tree festivities, arranged by the Independent Mutual Aid Society, will take place. Each Year, without fail, these festivities ...

    Russian
    III B 3 b, II B 1 a, II D 1
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- January 19, 1935
    To All Guests Present at the St. George's Parish Entertainment

    This year, the traditional Christmas tree festivity, arranged by St. George's Parish, was unusually successful. In spite of the economic crisis, and the consequent unemployment and need existing among the Russians in Chicago, two thousand people attended this gala celebration. The hall was packed. The musical part of the program, arranged carefully, with an eye to the selection of the best talent, went off with unprecedented success, and the guests were delighted with it. The committee on arrangements wishes to express its gratitude to the pupils of the Kriilov and Bunin schools, as well as to their parents, for their participation in the concert. Particular thanks are due Mr. Schumkov, the director of the schools, who expended a great deal of effort in order to make the stage appearance of these pupils, an outstanding event.

    This year, the traditional Christmas tree festivity, arranged by St. George's Parish, was unusually successful. In spite of the economic crisis, and the consequent unemployment and need existing among the ...

    Russian
    III B 3 b, II B 1 a, II B 2 f, III C
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- April 27, 1935
    Easter Days by G. Volos

    During Easter, during the great spring holiday, every member of the Russian colony recalls many things connected with his far-distant native land. He remembers vividly the wretched, yet very dear village lost somewhere in the wide spaces of the province of Grodno or Minsk, where he spent the best years of his life. These recollections bind us intimately not only with our kinfolk, but also with our neighbors and the friends of our childhood and adolescence. During these days our hearts grow tender; we become kinder and nobler men.

    Suddenly we recall that in the old country we lived on friendlier terms--we were more like brothers--although officially we were not united. That fraternal feeling revealed the better side of our natures and the nobler quality of the Slavic spirit. All of us: Russians, Poles, White Russians, 2Ukrainians, sometimes quarrel among ourselves, but we cannot get along without one another, we always gravitate toward one another because we are children of the same Slavic family; we are all brothers and sooner or later we will unite.

    The best representatives of the Russian colony in Chicago, the more cultured members of our colony, have realized this for a long time. They have understood that our strength lies in our unity, in our love for one another, in mutual assistance. With this purpose in mind, twenty-four years ago, the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society, RNzOV, was founded. In our society every Slav can receive help and assistance in time of need; he may enroll and become a full-fledged member of the organization, and by communal effort, help to create the future history of the Slavic people.

    In our native land, in our own home, we were more secure, we had no care for the future, and, therefore, we were more kindly and friendlier toward one another. Here, in the country of the dollar, in an epoch of materialism, 3we quite often forget that spiritual values, both of individuals and of people as a whole, are higher than material goods. The services rendered by the more active members of the Russian Independent Mutual Aid Society to the Russian colony are great, and they consist mainly in that they remind the great mass of Russians of the truth of the above statement by their disinterested and self-sacrificing work for the sake of the Russian people in America. They serve as examples, to some people and are a reproach to others.

    RNzOV is fulfilling a sacred obligation, and we all should unite around this society. Here, in the country that is strange to us, we must especially remember that only by uniting along national lines will we gain strength, and only thus can we preserve our national identity and prevent our disappearance from the face of the earth. RNzOV is the only Russian organization which shuns politics and sets forth as its aim the unification of the Slavs on the basis of mutual aid, on the basis of developing cultural and national values. This society is an organization which strives to rear the Russian-American 4youth in a spirit of respect for their elders and for the Russian people, and in the spirit of love of Russia.

    During these Easter days, with our thoughts turned toward our far-distant native land, we shall with brotherly love unite together under the banner of co-operation and mutual aid. "All for one and one for all." Remember the words of the song in the Easter service: "We shall embrace one another and unite, for Christ has arisen."

    During Easter, during the great spring holiday, every member of the Russian colony recalls many things connected with his far-distant native land. He remembers vividly the wretched, yet very dear ...

    Russian
    II D 1, III B 3 b, III H
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- [Unknown date]
    Christmas Party of Russian Club "Znaniye" (Knowledge).

    A Christmas party with dances, songs, orchestra and a chorus was held by this society on December 25, 1916.

    A Christmas party with dances, songs, orchestra and a chorus was held by this society on December 25, 1916.

    Russian
    III B 3 b
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- [Unknown date]
    Christmas Entertainment given by Russian Club "Native Hearth" (Rodnoi Ochag).

    On December 25, 1924 this society gave a masquerade dance.

    On December 25, 1924 this society gave a masquerade dance.

    Russian
    III B 3 b