The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    The Campaign against the Russo-American Treaty.

    "For us Russians the most important event of the past two weeks has been the publication of the Russian-American Treaty." The writer then gives in a few words the history of attempts to negotiate such a treaty from 1873 to 1886. "Using the panic of the bourgeoisie which followed the events in Chicago in 1886, Russian officials renewed their underground machinations. Until taken up by the Russians the business remained in embryo. The treaty failed in the Senate. Its further history is already known to our readers. At the present time there is in progress active preparation for a new campaign against the treaty. In New York there has been formed an American "Society for Suppression of the Treaty", in Chicago likewise agitation has arisen. . . . The Russian-American League here opens its activity with a public Russian meeting on Saturday in the hall of the Progressive Club, Santer's Hall, corner Johnson and 14th Sts." (The text of the treaty is appended).

    "For us Russians the most important event of the past two weeks has been the publication of the Russian-American Treaty." The writer then gives in a few words the history ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I E, I C
  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    The Russo-American Treaty.

    The magazine denounces the treaty entered into by the United States and Russia which provided for the extradition of criminals. It was feared that it would be used against Russian revolutionaries. "This convention, at the present time and in such a form, is nothing more than an official declaration of the sympathy of the American Government for the Russian Tsar. But back of the American Government there is still the American People."

    "Everywhere Russian immigrants have had the opportunity to arouse public discussion of the treaty the masses have shown themselves to be against it. We cannot call a halt. The treaty must and shall be annulled. Republicans and democrats alike are responsible; the negotiations began under Cleveland, the treaty was ratified by a republican senate with the aid of democratic votes (without which the two-thirds majority could not have been reached). The exchange of ratifications was carried out by Cleveland and Gresham, who insolently laughed at the protests of public opinion. The Russian citizens of America are bound to settle accounts with the venal tsarist satellites at the approaching elections. Russian Jews who vote for 2the republicans will vote for the Russian Tsar, for a system of political, religious and national intolerance, for the persecution of five millions of the Jewish masses. Such a Jewish republican or Jewish democrat every honest man will brand with the shameful name of Judas."

    The magazine denounces the treaty entered into by the United States and Russia which provided for the extradition of criminals. It was feared that it would be used against Russian ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I E, I C
  • Russkaya Zhizn -- May 11, 1918
    Russians and the Third Liberty Loan

    "The organizing committee of the present meeting asked me, as an official representative, to tell you, Russian citizens, a few words about the purpose of the Third Liberty Loan. I accepted the request with the greatest of pleasures for many reasons.

    "Firstly, it gives me great pleasure to speak to the colony and to tell it my opinion as to what direction it should take in these hard times which we are now enduring; secondly, I wish to tell you ...., that the present evening appears to be a great step ahead in the life of our colony. Up to now, as you know, we have had meetings of several different clubs, parties, and religions. The present evening appears to be favorable for an alliance of the colony; no 2matter what parties there are, it is a national affair.

    "This is the first manifestation of our colony in behalf of this friendly country which has given us shelter and has treated us the same as other people, (enabling us) to enjoy freedom in spiritual and cultural development.

    "Russian citizens, the moment has come when you can and when you should declare the loyalty of the Russian heart to America for all that America and her people, and her most honorable representative, President Wilson, have done and continue to do for your injured mother country, and by so doing they do (the same) for each of you and to all of you likewise. You remember, my fellow citizens, when Russia, after the three years of bloodshed, of war, without provisions, without ammunition, hungry and cold, - was forced to 3leave the battlefield. All had forsaken her. I do not want to criticize one of the greatest active men of England, Lloyd George. I am sure he did not want to give the meaning to the words he expressed in the very minute of desperation, but these words sounded as an insult to the Russian nation. You remember the words of Lloyd George, who pronounced them quite loudly, (saying) that Russia cannot fight any longer and therefore it is necessary to leave them to themselves.' Who opposed this decision in parliament? The representative of the American nation, President Wilson. He, as a wise statesman, understood the condition of our ruined Russia and was not afraid to step out in her defense.

    "You remember when three weeks ago we all were troubled by news that Japan had decided to occupy Vladivostok and establish its foot in Siberia.

    4

    "There is no smoke without a fire, and those plans no doubt have been (long) in preparation. But (who) mixed them up? Again it was the faithful friend of Russia, the representative of the American nation, President Wilson. The future historian of Russia (if only our country-will pull through this catastrophe) whose duty it will be to record the personal merit of the far-seeing man of politics of that great nation, and the Russian people, will be obliged to remember long the helping hand of the American nation in saving Russia from being devoured by Germany.

    "In what way can we, the citizens of free Russia who have emigrated to America, repay good for good?

    "War, my friends, is a terrible thing and, thanks to the culture of Germany, a cruel hyena. I shall not describe to you all the horrors of war. I shall only tell you that in order to conquer the spirit of 5Satan which is the Kaiser, it is necessary to have many millions in the army and a yet greater amount of sound money. These are the means, my friends, by which we can and should help America, with our lives and with our pockets.

    "I kindly ask you to join the army and offer every dollar that you can get along without. Do not forget, my friends, that only by this you can prove that you still love our poor country and that you wish her liberation.

    "I wish to warn you that whatever you hold back now you will be sorry for in the not far off future. Russia as a nation, I speak to you with zeal in my heart, at this very minute does not exist.

    "In order to save Russia, its honor and its right to existence, it is 6necessary that the Allies should crush the hydra of German militarism. We should conquer, and if the endeavors of our Allies fail, then good-by fatherland, good-by honor, good-by liberty of the Russian nation and the democracy of all the world - all will go for nothing and we all shall be under Germany. And do you know what this means? It is easier to take a rope and to tighten up the noose around our own neck and kick for a while our legs in the air.

    "Offer your dollars, hard-working Russian fellow countrymen, and the Righteous God will reward you for the fulfillment of a duty of honor."

    "The organizing committee of the present meeting asked me, as an official representative, to tell you, Russian citizens, a few words about the purpose of the Third Liberty Loan. I ...

    Russian
    I G, III H, III B 1
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- June 07, 1923
    They Leave Russia

    According to the latest reports, the Committee of the American Relief Administration and some other organizations which were helping Russia, have decided to stop their work there in the near future. The reasons for doing this are said to be as follows: The data that have been gathered show that the crop in August will be such that Russia will not need any more help from outside. The representatives of the above mentioned relief organizations stated that Russia will be able to provide herself with food. On the other hand, the newspapers are continuing to publish telegrams and letters reporting poor crops and even famine in some parts of Russia. The Soviet papers are squarely stating that there are almost five million hungry people in the Soviet Republics of Russia. The foreign papers maintain that the number of the hungry is still larger. The reports of some papers are to the effect that the number of people needing relief is from eight to ten million persons. The Nansen Relief Organization and the Quakers have figured the 2same way and have decided to continue their work in Russia. As with everything concerning Russia, so also in the case of the question as to the number of those suffering from famine in that country, it is very hard to get any clear results. But it is obvious that the famine is still raging there. And that is why one cannot understand what were the reasons which prompted the Committee of the American Relief Administration to abandon its work in Soviet Russia. This organization has done a lot in the field of aid to Russia. It is to be regretted that it abandons Russia now.

    According to the latest reports, the Committee of the American Relief Administration and some other organizations which were helping Russia, have decided to stop their work there in the near ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I E
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- July 17, 1923
    Mr. Gompers and Russia. (Editorial)

    Mr. S. Gompers, the aged leader of the American Federation of Labor, still opposes the recognition of the Soviet government by America and the resumption of commercial relations with Russia.

    He struggles energetically, trying to put through his view of this matter in the American Federation of Labor, and defending these views also outside the Federation.

    He has been struggling hard for a long time. Whenever there is an opportunity he comes forward with a bitter criticism of the activities of the Soviet government, and would especially denounce any leanings of the American government towards resuming commercial relations with Russia.

    And Mr. Gompers does this in spite of the fact that members and prominent leaders of the American Federation of Labor have been demanding for a long time the recognition of Russia and the restoration of friendly 2relation with it. The same demands have been made by some senators and congressmen and by many heads of commercial firms.

    The chief arguments used by Gompers are as follows: the absence in Russia of complete freedom of the press and of organizing unions, leagues, etc.

    In a letter addressed to the senators, King and Ladd, who have left recently for Russia, Mr. Gompers declares that before demanding the recognition of the Soviet government, the senators should inquire about the following matters:

    Is it true that freedom of the press does not exist in Russia? Are the workers allowed to join professional unions and to organize unions without interference on the part of the government?

    Mr. Gompers asks further: are the members of the Soviet government also members of the Third Internationale, and is the government of Russia ready to acknowledge the debts of the old regime to foreign countries?

    Let us admit that there is no complete freedom of the press nor a 3sufficient freedom of organizing unions.

    But did these things exist in Russia under the autocratic regime? At that time Mr. Gompers did not demand these things to be granted to the Russians. The freedom of the press and of organizing labor unions is suppressed in Italy, in Poland, in Roumania, in Hungary.

    America recognizes the governments of these countries, and Mr. Gompers does not demand that in these countries freedom of the press and of labor organizations should be instituted.

    It is strange also that a leader of workers should demand from Russia the payment of debts incurred by the Tsar's government. What makes him so concerned about the interests of the French, English and other bankers?

    The leader of the American Federation of Labor is not just towards Russia. In the case of Russia his justice becomes rather severe.

    Meanwhile both in Russia and in America there are voiced continually demands for the restoration of friendly relations between these 4two countries. Existing conditions have been demanding this already for a long time.

    Mr. S. Gompers, the aged leader of the American Federation of Labor, still opposes the recognition of the Soviet government by America and the resumption of commercial relations with Russia. ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I D 2 a 2, I E
  • Russkii Viestnik -- December 26, 1923
    Russia and America

    According to latest information the recently expected agreement between Russia and the United States will not occur. Once more there have appeared difficulties in the restoration of the friendly terms between these two world's greatest republics. The Russian-American colony and our native country have learned this news with extreme regret. The many millions of people in Russia and the Russian citizens residing in America await with impatience the time of the restoration of friendly relations between these countries. At different times Russia has done much for America. America, in its turn, did the same for Russia. American aid during famine and epidemics will never be forgotten by our native country. The aid was grandiose and unexampled. America, during the famine and epidemics, saved 100,000 lives. The aid was given wide, impartially, and with American-like speed and ability. Steamships loaded with food 2clothing, and medicines were sent to Russia with amazing speed. Thousands of American physicians, nurses, employees of different organizations, and officials, worked without ceasing for the aid of Russia. America gave help not only to the hungry and sick of Russia, but also to needy peasants and thousands of children. During the famine and other troubles, Russia was imbued with great sympathy towards America. One can say without exaggeration, that all of the Russian peasants, workers, intellectuals, and even children, were deeply grateful to America for its aid. Besides this there are two more reasons why Russia and the Russians in general look impatiently toward the restoration of friendly relations. The first of them is that Russia particularly needs the exchange of goods with America. This exchange is going on right now, but not on a large scale, which would be the case if America officially restored commercial relations with Russia. The second reason is as follows: hundreds of thousands of Russian citizens of different nationalities are residing in the United States. All of them keep in touch with Russia; and Russia keeps in touch 3with Russians in America. Both sides are deeply interested in the restoration of good relations between the two countries. We wrote many times about the causes that are still separating these countries. In the near future we will write again about this question.

    But now we can certainly say that the news of their disagreement will be received by Russia very sadly. There are short telegrams about it right now.

    The Russian colony received this news with extreme grief.

    According to latest information the recently expected agreement between Russia and the United States will not occur. Once more there have appeared difficulties in the restoration of the friendly terms ...

    Russian
    III B 1, III H, I E
  • Russkii Viestnik -- January 17, 1924
    What Should Our Orientation Be? By D. L. Orlovsky

    Our life in America is closely connected with our peasant brothers in Russia, or, as they call it, the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics. The link that binds us is our common peasant interests. Everything that is going on over there, good or bad, is deeply interesting to all of us, since we greeted in the past the revolution against tsarism and its military, clergy and civil opritchniks (henchmen of the tsar), and expected that with the victory of the revolution the three-headed dragon would pass into the domain of history, and instead of it the cherished idea of freedom and equality will triumph. During the six years since that time and now, the people of the former Russian empire, who suffered so much, have survived many revolutions and counter-revolutions. During that period of time we have heard and read many undescribable horrors about our country on one hand and many attractive things on the other.

    2

    Some exaggerate and others lie. Who is to be believed? Who is right? Who is guilty of the horrible experiences of the weary people? One thing is clear: it is an axiom that he who is strong in power and a conqueror is also right, because conquerors are not judged; but woe is to temporary conquerors! There is hardly a more beautiful moment in the whole of human history than the great February Revolution of 1917. Greatness without bloodshed, unspeakable joy of a world fond of liberty incarnated in those happy days, the high ideals of the best fighters for the liberation of millions of people, who are deprived of their rights from bondage. All the people of new Russia felt like brothers, were kissing each other, and were weeping from joy. The World War was a terrible inheritance of the revolutionary Russia. While the new revolutionary government was clearing up the inherited tsaristic horrors, international war and chaos, the Bolsheviks took advantage of 3the revolutionary freedom and confusion and skillfully using all kinds of slogans, suggested to the army they leave the lines and enjoy the hard won liberty, etc. The results were: the disbandment of the disbandment of the Revolutionary Constituent Assembly with the aid of bayonets; the Bolshevist regime; the Brest-Litovsk farce or the concluding of peace; the horrible Chrezvychayka; the general exile and destroying of those people and intellectuals whose ideas were opposed to the ideas of the Bolsheviks; idiotic money experiments; the thorough abolition of the freedom of press, speech, and meetings; exciting the criminal civil war, which, if not for the Ukrainian ataman, Machno,would have signalized the restoration of tsarism in Russia; the most horrible famine in the history of the human race; exile to Siheria and the far Siberian swamps, executions of upright revolutionaries who gave away everything for the fight for the liberty of the people, and many other traps, which were arranged by the Bolshevist powers against the will of the great majority of the whole population. These are the indisputable achievements of the Bolshevist or Communist powers.

    4

    There was a time when, if we could not agree, at least we could reconcile ourselves to supporting the Soviet regime during the monarchical counter-revolutionary period of Kolchak, Dienikin, Yudenich, and Wrangel. "Help us to defeat the tsarist generals who are attempting to re-establish the tsar," cried the Bolshevist leaders, "and we will begin to live again a free brotherly life." The Bolsheviks at that time had not yet shown their teeth to the people, and the people, preferring the lesser evil, absolutely destroyed all the counter-revolutionary plots of the tsaristic generals.

    The Bolsheviks triumphed and forgot about the people, in the same manner as the Russian tsars in the past. The Communist clique felt that it was the master of the situation. The salt of Russian and Ukrainian soil, the peasants, were plundered, worn out, unscrupulously deceived and deprived even of the sacred right to decide their own affairs; they were almost deprived of the right to vote. And all for the sake of a few 5uncalled for, newly arrived rulers. One should be insane to believe in the good intentions and soundness of the Bolshevist authorities.

    Russia moaned three hundred years under the Tartar yoke. But what comparison! The Mongols at least did not pretend to be liberators; they did not lie. The Bolsheviks had, seemingly given to all nationalities national freedom on the basis of the Union of the Republics, but from Moscow was sent a decree "to hold and not let it go." The red army and its commanders are trembling for their lives; silently and dejectedly they are obeying the orders from the Kremlin. But, will that be always the way? The iron discipline!. Such is the secret of their power. Is there even one family in Bolshevist territory which did not suffer, or did not lose some relatives as victims of the Bolshevist fury? Who, if not the Bolsheviks themselves, are exciting the anger of the people, driving the people to despair and into a state of submission even to the monarchical regime which is emerging again in Russia? We should not protest against 6the recognition of the Soviet power by other countries, as we did not demand in the past the cessation of relations with the tsaristic power by other countries. On the contrary, relations with the outside world, together with a certain pressure exercised by the love of liberty, can either bring the Bolsheviks to their senses, or else against their will they will have to face the same fate the same fate which befell the tsarist regime of blessed memory.

    We must hope that by some means or other the torturing of the people of our country will be stopped. It is impossible to stand it any more and be silent. The cup of patience is overflowing. We, peasants, more than the rest, have been suffering under the pressure of one tyrant or another. We must make them feel that we are a class which gives all and gets nothing but insults, oppression and mockery.

    We who demand land, enlightenment, and liberty, are peasants, but we are peasants of the past. We are persons, able to sacrifice, to fight, 7 and do everythingl but do not force upon us your services with your bayonets. We have among us teachers, artists, actors, physicians and professors, and if that is not sufficient, then we are ready to invite more, not as leaders and dictators, but as hired workers.

    And you must realize that we are not in sympathy with your desires and attempts to abuse anything or anyone. We must live humanely and once and for all erase the injustice done to us. Out of the way! The peasant who broke the chains of slavery is coming! Our aim, as peasants, is to earn our place as free human beings in our country. Our native country, entanlged by the Bolsheviks, is praying for mercy; it is waiting for the moment when it will be able to say to the newcomers, the enslavers: "Hands off!"

    Our life in America is closely connected with our peasant brothers in Russia, or, as they call it, the Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics. The link that binds us ...

    Russian
    III H, I E, III B 1
  • Russkii Viestnik -- January 17, 1924
    How Should Our Orientation Be? by D. L. Orlovsky.

    Our life in America is closely connected with our peasant brothers in Russia, or as they call it the Union of the Soviet Socialistic Republics. The link that binds us is our common peasant interests. Everything that is going on over there, good or bad, is deeply interesting to all of us, since we greeted in the past the revolution against tsarism and its military, clergy and civil opritchniks, (henchmen of the Tsar), and expected that with the victory of the revloution the three headed dragon would pass into the domain of history, and instead of it the covenant idea of freedom and equality will triumph. In the six years since that time and now the people of the former Russian Empire who suffered so much, have survived many revolutions and counter-revolutions. During that period of time we have heard and read many undescribable horrors about our country on one hand and many attractive things on the other. Some exaggerate and others lie. Who is to be believed. Who is right? Who is guilty of the horrible experiences of the weary people? One thing is clear; it is an axiom that he, who is strong, in power and a conqueror, is also right, because conquerors 2are not judged, but misfortune is with temporary conquerors! There is hardly a more beautiful monent in the whole of human history than the Great February Revolution of 1917. Greatness without bloodshed, unspeakable joy of a world fond of liberty incarnated in those happy days; the high ideals of the best fighters for the liberation of millions of people, who are deprived of their rights from bondage. All the people of new Russia felt like brothers, were kissing each other, and were weeping from joy. The world war was a terrible inheritance of the Revolutionary Russia. While the new revolutionary government was clearing up the inherited tsaristic horrors, international was and chaos--the bolsheviks--took advantage of the revolutionary freedom and confusion, and skillfully using all kind of pass-words, suggested to the army they leave the lines and enjoy the hard-won liberty, etc. The results, were the disbandment of the Revolutionary Constituent Assembly with the aid of bayonets, the bolshevistic regime, the Brest-Litovsk farce or the concluding of peace, the horrible Chrezvichayka, the general exile and destroying of the people and intellectuals, whose ideas were opposed to the ideas of the bolsheviks; idiotic money experiments, the resolute 3abolition of the freedom of press, speech and meeting. Exciting the criminal civil war, which if not for the Ukrainian Atuman, Machno, would have signalized the restoration of Tsarism in Russia, the most horrible famine in the history of the human race exile to Siberia and the far Siberian swamps, executions of upright revolutionaries who gave away everything for the fight for the liberty of the people, and many other traps, which were arranged by the bolshevistic powers against the will of the great majority of the whole population. This are the indisputable merits of the bolshevistic or the communistic powers.

    There was a time when, if we could not agree, at least we could reconcile ourselves to supporting the Soviet regime during the monarchial counterrevolutionary period of Kolchak, Dienikin, Yudenich and Wrangel. 'Help us to defeat the tsarist generals who are attempting to reestablish the Tsar', cried the bolshevistic leaders,'and we will begin to live again a free brotherly life'. The bolsheviks at that time had not yet succeeded in showing their teeth to the people and the people, preferring the lesser 4evil, absolutely destroyed all the counter-revolutionary plots of the tsaristic generals.

    The bolsheviks triumphed and forgot about the people, in the same manner as the Russian Tsars in the past. The communistic clique had felt themselves to be the masters of the situation. The salt of Russian and Ukrainian soil--the peasants were plundered, worn out, in a very unscrupulous manner deceived and deprived even of the sacred right to decide their own affairs; they were almost deprived of the right to vote. And all for the sake of a few unwanted newly arrived rulers. One should be insane to believe in the good intentions and soundness of the bolshevistic powers.

    Russia moaned three hundred years under the Tartar yoke. But what a comparison; the Mongols at least did not pretend to be liberators; they did not lie. The bolsheviks had, seemingly, given to all nationalities, national freedom on the basis of the Union of the Republics, but from Moscow was sent a decree 'to hold and not let it go'. The red army and its commanders are trembling for their life, silently and dejectedly are obeying the orders 5from the Kremlin. But, will that be always the way?. The iron discipline! Where is the secret of power? Is there even one family in Bolshevist territory which did not suffer, or did not lose some of their relatives as victims of the bolshevistic fury? Who, if not the bolsheviks, are exciting the anger of the people toward themselves, driving the people to despair and into a state of submission even to the monarchical regime which is emerging again in Russia? We should not protest against the recognition of the Soviet power by other countries, as we did not demand in the past the cessation of relations with the tsartic power by other countries. On the contrary, relations with the outside world together with a certain pressure exercised by the love of liberty, can either bring the bolsheviks to their senses, or else against their will they will have to face the same fate which befell the Tsarist regime of blessed memory.

    By some means or other we must wait the cessation of the inquisition of the people and our native country. It is impossible to stand it any more and be silent. The cup of patience is too over-filled. We peasants, 6more than the rest, perished under the pressure of one tyrant for another. We must make them feel that we are a class which gives all and gets nothing but insults, oppression and jests.

    We, who demand land, enlightenment and liberty peasants, but we are peasants of the past. We are persons, able to sacrifice, to fight and do everything, but do not force upon us your services with your bayonets. We have among us teachers, artists, actors, physicians and professors, and if that is not sufficient, then we are ready to invite more, not as leaders and dictators, but as hired workers.

    And realize, that we are strange to your desires and attempts to abuse anything or anyone. We must live humanely and once and for all erase the injustice done to us. Out of the way! The peasant, who broke the chains of slavery is coming! Our way as peasants is to earn our place as free human beings in our country. Our native country, entangled by the bolsheviks, is praying for mercy; it is waiting for the moment when it will be able to say to the newconers, the enslavers: Hands off!

    D. D. Orlovsky.

    Our life in America is closely connected with our peasant brothers in Russia, or as they call it the Union of the Soviet Socialistic Republics. The link that binds us ...

    Russian
    III H, I E, III B 1
  • Russkii Viestnik -- February 11, 1926
    Around the Colony. a Discussion of Russia

    The question of the recognition of Russia is being earnestly discussed at present in America.

    Much attention is given to this question in the newspapers and the magazines. It is being discussed also at meetings of various organizations. and these meetings attract large crowds.

    Some express the view that Russia should be recognized without any delay, and that friendly relations with our native country should be restored. Others oppose this view.

    For us, Russian emigrants living in America, this question is particularly interesting.

    With the exception of a small group of fanatical persons holding 2ultra-conservative views, we all, both those who are violent enemies of the Communists, and those who are friends of the Soviet regime, desire that Russia should be recognized as soon as possible. The resumption of diplomatic relations with Russia will undoubtedly have a beneficent influence on its economic life and on the life of many Russian emigrants residing in America.

    On Sunday, at the Olympic Theatre, the Chicago Forum arranges a discussion of the following theme: "Should Russia be recognized?"

    The first speaker will be the well known American journalist, Captain Paxon Hibben. He will speak in favor of the recognition of Russia. The Chicago Forum is trying to find a worthy opponent for this speaker.

    Captain Hibben is very well acquainted with Russia and the situation in that country.

    3

    Under the tsarist regime Captain Hibben was a member of the diplomatic corps of the Embassy of the United States in Russia. From 1914 to 1917 he was a war correspondent of several newspapers and magazines. During the last five years of his stay in Russia, he was a representative of President Hoover's Relief Administration in Russia.

    His report about Russia should be very interesting and instructive.

    A. Zemetchensky.

    The question of the recognition of Russia is being earnestly discussed at present in America. Much attention is given to this question in the newspapers and the magazines. It is ...

    Russian
    III B 1
  • Rassviet (The Dawn) -- February 10, 1927
    Whose Fault Is It?

    A Russian colonist who is dreaming about his return to the native country, in talking to one of the local Bolsheviki, reproached the Soviet government for closing the borders of Soviet Russia and forcing him to roam aimlessly in foreign countries. In replying to him, the Bolsheviki remarked that the Soviet government would welcome the return of the Russians, but cannot help them because there is no representative of that government in the United States. If the colonists desire to return to Russia, they must try to get such a representative. Such reasoning is not right, says the editor.

    The political break between Russia and America has nothing to do with the return of Russians to their native country. In the years of 1920 and 1921 there also were no representatives in America, still many colonists, both single persons and whole groups, went to Russia without hindrance. Thus, the assertions of the local Bolsheviks do not stand criticism. The Russian people cannot return to Russia, to their relatives 2and friends, only through the fault of the Soviet government, because it closed the borders.

    The Soviet government must open them again for the Russian workers, irrespective of the fact that they have or have not their representative in this or some other country.

    A Russian colonist who is dreaming about his return to the native country, in talking to one of the local Bolsheviki, reproached the Soviet government for closing the borders of ...

    Russian
    III B 2, III B 1