The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Reform Advocate -- March 19, 1892
    [Relief Society Formed]

    Amass meeting of Jewish young men was held on March 13, 1892, at Kimball Hall. This mass meeting, composed of five-hundred young men of the city of Chicago, deeming prompt action better than slow relief, does now and hereby constitute itself a society to be known hereafter as "The Young Men's Russian Relief Association."

    The object of this organization is to cooperate with the executive committee of the Russian Aid Society, for the purpose of placing as speedily as possible the Jewish exiles driven from Russia, their native land, in such surroundings and positions as will make them self-supporting, with due and careful regard to the physical and moral requirements of the newcomers and the best interest of all classes of the general population of our country.

    The government of this association is to be vested in a board of directors, consisting of fifteen members, to be elected by this body, and the qualifications for which shall be that these are young men, and the board of directors are hereby fully vested with power to make all further rules and regulations 2and qualifications for membership of this organization as may seem to them just and proper.

    The following gentlemen were them selected as the executive committee: Oscar G. Foreman, Moses Solomon, Milton J. Foreman, August Gatzert, Julius E. Weil, Leo A. Loeb, Harry Pflaum, David Eichberg, Israel Cowen, Leon Hornstein, M. H. Mandelbaum, Ed. A. Rosenthal, Hilton A. Strauss, Leopold Oesterreicher and Sol D. Lee.

    The chair appointed a committee on collections, selecting one member from each if the organizations of our city wherein young men are represented, as follows: Phoenix Club, M. J. Spiegel; Ideal Club, S. J. Marks; Chicago Lodge, H. W. Hahn; West Chicago Club, Maurice Rothschild; Standard Club, Edwin F. Meyer; Herder Lodge, Max Guthman; Zion Literary Society, J. Ringer; North-West Chicago Club, Leo Taussig; Montefiore Council, Sam Rosenthal; Myrtle Council, Moritz Hirsch; Cremieux Society, Leon V. Becker; Concordia, Ralph Leopold; Lakeside Club, Maurice L. Ash; Lessing Club, Max Pam.

    3

    On Tuesday night, the newly elected executive committee met and organized by electing the following officers: President, Milton J. Foreman; First Vice-President, Julius E. Weil; Second Vice-President, Leon Hornstein; Recording Secretary, M. H. Mandelbaum; Financial Secretary, Harry Pflaum; Treasurer, Oscar G. Foreman.

    The committee on collections are already actively at work, and the result of their labor is seen in the contributions that are being obtained. The work is being pushed systematically, and many thousands of dollars will be raised among the young men.

    Amass meeting of Jewish young men was held on March 13, 1892, at Kimball Hall. This mass meeting, composed of five-hundred young men of the city of Chicago, deeming prompt ...

    Russian
    II D 1
  • Reform Advocate -- April 02, 1892
    [Sheltering House]

    The Executive Committee in aid of the Russian Refugees has purchased a large dwelling house, corner of Maxwell and Clinton streets, to be used as a sheltering house and relief office. The cost was $12,500, the money being advanced by the Baron De Hirsch Fund Trustees of New York, on the personal guarantee of five members of the Executive Committee, Messrs. Adolph Loeb, Joseph Beifeld, Herman Grossman, A. H. Wolf and Mayer Newmann.

    The Executive Committee in aid of the Russian Refugees has purchased a large dwelling house, corner of Maxwell and Clinton streets, to be used as a sheltering house and relief ...

    Russian
    II D 1, II D 6
  • [Miscellaneous] -- May 01, 1912
    Miscellaneous Material owned by Dr. H. R. Krasnow: The Russian National Brotherhood of St. George First Section of the Russian National Orthodox Society, 917 N. Wood St., Chicago; organized

    Meetings are held every second Sunday of the month.

    Persons between the ages of sixteen and thirty years are accepted at this bureau in January and July without an initiation fee; between forty and forty-five, for half of the initiation fee. Those desiring to enter the bureau may register every Sunday at the quarters of the Russian National School, 917 N. Wood St., telephone Monroe 5179.

    We risk our life daily, which is dear to us and our relatives, by working in factories. After an unfortunate accident in a factory, frequently the family of the victim, having lost its breadwinner, is placed in a critical 2condition. With little children on her hands, the poor widow does not know where to lay her head and how to get the means for feeding her children.

    In the majority of cases the victim himself is at fault. He has not protected himself and his family against accident.

    In order not to get into a situation of this kind, hurry to register before it is too late.

    D. Michalchik, President

    Radion Poleshuk, Cashier

    Andrei Hapanowich, Secretary.

    Meetings are held every second Sunday of the month. Persons between the ages of sixteen and thirty years are accepted at this bureau in January and July without an initiation ...

    Russian
    II D 1, II D 2
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- May 18, 1914
    On Methods of Organizing American Russia.

    Ivan Gorsky, in developing his conception of how the Russian colonies in American should be organized (and who should organize them) shows much clear, practical thinking.

    This question of organizing American Russia was the topic of the day at that time (May, 1914) in the Russkoye Slovo, and Gorsky, begins his letter by objecting to the question "whether organization is at all necessary, and if so should it be of an ecclesiastical or in any way of a religious nature". He feels that it was poor strategy to pose the question thusly. He asserts that the Russian immigration is chiefly a peasant immigration. No industrial workers, no bourgeoisic- entirely raw material, without any political credo; illiterate.

    Gorsky therefore contends that it would be foolish "to entertain notions that the peasants, in their present state of mind on realities would flock to any type of organization". He further shows, and with much insight, that a considerable amount of petty organizational detail 2work would be necessary as foundation,- "and only organizations with material aid in them would insure everybody's sympathy".

    Gorsky boldly states his view on the absurdity of inviting everyone who is desirous of organizing American Russia, irrespective of convictions held by these people. "In my opinion the progressive elements of the Russian Colonies must join their efforts to create a type of a progressive peasant-Industrial organization with Cultural-Educational objectives on the one hand, and material mutual aid on the other hand, not without its Bureau of Information and broad propaganda chiefly on farm labor". Further,-- "Inasmuch as the fates have transformed the peasantry here into Industrial workers their interests are, as a result, bound-up with the interests of the American proletariat, and it is imperative that they go hand-in-hand with the American Trade-Unions." He demands that the leaders of thought in the colony do not hobnob with reactionary Russian forces here: "Inasmuch as the organizations will be progressive they must fight the enemies of progress, tsarist agents and satellites, the well-groomed black-hundreds, whose chief slogan is 'slug the Jew, the alien, and the intellectual'". The job of organizing must be done by 3progressives only, whatever their particular leaning as a progressive may be. He further suggests that while the organization is primarily for industrialized peasants and, as such, is chiefly a 'Russian and National organization' yet this should not mean "Nationalistic" - other nationalities should not be barred from membership if they desire to make themselves useful to the Russian Colony.

    In conclusion, Gorsky summarizes the situation thus:-

    a. "Before developing the viewpoints of Krapotkin or Marx to the Russian Muzhik it is necessary to teach him reading, writing, and at least a little of thinking."Afterwards one may go ahead and "treat the peasant to the luxuries of collectivism and communistic anarchism".

    b. That progressive non-partisan organizations will have greater success because they are more popular, more lasting, better attended.He also urges autonomy for each organization.

    (Note; This article shows the difficulties facing Russian organizations.)

    Ivan Gorsky, in developing his conception of how the Russian colonies in American should be organized (and who should organize them) shows much clear, practical thinking. This question of organizing ...

    Russian
    I C, II D 1, I E
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- June 04, 1914
    (Correspondence) On Organizing.

    This article signed for Russian Immigrants, written in a rasping, biting style, It is another expression on the topic of Methods of organizing American Russia. The opening sentence is typical of the exasperated, but intelligent Russian. He arraigns the local leaders of the colony for their large intentions but small achievements.

    "Already for seven or eight years the idea of self-help organization, akin to the "Arbeiter Ring", has been hovering among the Russian laborers; many of them are members of Jewish, Irish, or German organizations", because one of their own is, as yet, non-existent.

    He does not deny the fact (as he sees it) - that the Russian immigrants, chiefly peasents, need an organization which would first and foremost help him materially. The Russian immigrant needs a job,needs practical advice, needs protection, language, then, in most difficult moments he needs assistance in cash.In this direction, organization should -2be steered... What nonsense to meditate on nationalism under such conditions. Russia has numerous nationalities, and if organizers will stress one to the exclusion or neglect of the other, such an organization will die at birth".

    Should the organization be ecclesiastical? Those who have such needs will be ministered to for a small consideration in Temples of religion specially designed for such purposes....The same may be said of the importance of political leanings in organizations.-- "I can be a socialist, an anarchist, a monarchist, a republican, and at the same time a member of a sport-club or be insured in any Insurance Company I may choose. Why cannot I, a socialist, be a member of an organization, whose goal it is to extend material and moral assistance to Russian immigrants"?

    The writer asks his compatriots why they could not accomplish, what Germans, Italians, Irish, Finnish, Letts, etc., have long since 3accomplished... "It would seem that we alone are incapable of even imitating those others,- we are so busy caucusing, cursing or worshipping those worthless little deities, which we have brought along with us from our half-savage fatherland".

    In conclusion, the writer apparently somewhat relieved from the accumulated pressure, gives somewhat more moderate council saying, that "if an organization with far-reaching objectives is beyond the strength of those who started it why not be content with a more Bureau of Information, just so that you steer in the beginning for the strictly material needs of the population instead of cultural educational. Unemployed, hungry,--one thinks little of culture. Without anchor, entirely dependent on chance one does inquire into universities, but after some degree of material security. Schools, universities, -- they can only be next in importance".

    This article signed for Russian Immigrants, written in a rasping, biting style, It is another expression on the topic of Methods of organizing American Russia. The opening sentence is typical ...

    Russian
    I C, II D 1, I E
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- February 02, 1916
    On the Russian Aid Society in Melrose Park, Ill.

    This article brings to the attention of the Russian reader the struggle for power in the above mentioned society and the struggle between its reactionary and progressive members. It tells of the lull in this struggle after a period of excitement over the preposterous acts of the officers, who struck the names of the members from the rolls without giving any reason for such acts, and forcibly removed members from meetings in like fashion. But then a general meeting was held to elect officers, to report on the latter half of 1915, etc. (January 23, 1916).

    The rule of this society was not to read at a general meeting the individual monthly report with all its petty details; this time, however, 2by request of the majority, these reports of the past months were read. The nonsense in which this leadership indulged was astounding. Here is one example: "At an affair one member gives his hat to the wardrobe, the worker there does not collect the dime for it, this member therefore, causes moral and material damage to the organization."

    The matter is chewed over and argued for more than thirty minutes without arriving at a conclusion, yet nothing at all is said about $5 which disappeared from the buffet cash book, or that the affair given by the organization resulted in a $4.95 deficit. On the whole, as this meeting clearly demonstrated, the organization barely makes ends meet, has only $4 in the treasury, although it was fortunate not to have death benefits to pay, and of the sixty members only two received sick benefit for nine weeks each, $4 per week.

    The writer laments the fate of this organization which "was conceived 3as an expression of democratic tendencies, turned republican later, but is now of purely monarchistic passions."

    "Instead of marching towards a bright future, changing an autocratic system, we are now inducting just such a system into our organization," since "a resolution was adopted at this meeting that the chairman of the organization be vested with unlimited power, and is to preside over every meeting."

    A Member.

    This article brings to the attention of the Russian reader the struggle for power in the above mentioned society and the struggle between its reactionary and progressive members. It tells ...

    Russian
    II D 1, I C, I E
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- February 07, 1916
    On a Mutual Aid Society

    This article tells of efforts by the Russian Socialist Party to organize non-partisan groups. As the writer proceeds with his report on these efforts, it becomes clear that by non-partisan is meant a combination of all shades of progressive "isms," rather than a blank non-partisan state of mind. The author records the discussion pro and con on non-partisan organizations at two meetings. Those opposing argued that such organizing, which must needs be done by the best workers in the Socialist Party, leaves a non-partisan group. These comrades pointed to the Arbeiter Ring as proof of their contention. "This organization drew off all the active forces of the Jewish Socialists, which weakened, and continues to weaken, the Jewish Socialist movement."

    2

    Those in favor of such organizations pointed to the Social-Democrats of Europe in general, and to the Russian social democracy in particular; it was further pointed out that "such non-partisan groups help us to get nearer to the masses, and to get them nearer to us." One comrade told his experience in organizing a non-partisan club in a Canadian town, with excellent results. And it was further pointed out that although the American-Russian colony never had anything resembling the Arbeiter Ring, yet its Socialist movement in America "is in an extremely weak stage of development."

    Some suggested joining the already existing non-partisan organization rather than organize a new society, the club Znaniye (Knowledge).

    But on a closer examination of its tenets the notion for joining it was shelved. "It appeared that outside of all else it was under the thumb of the local Russian Church, which made such a name for herself by the numerous evil deeds, which approximated even robberies."

    3

    In the club 'Knowledge,' supposedly non-partisan, all nationalities having the privilege of membership, one of the leaders in that club gave the following reply when he was asked whether Jews are accepted as members: "Yes, accepted, only we would put him in such a position that he would go of his own accord." It was further stated that the members have no voice in the rules of the club, the chairman is vested with very broad authority, and it is forbidden to discuss politics at meetings.

    The writer concludes his article by stating that the Russian Socialist Party of Chicago in the end adopted a resolution to the effect that it was desirable to organize a non-partisan mutual aid society, and a committee was named to familiarize the colony with such a plan, to work out a plan of organizing the society and to work out the fundamental points of the society's statute. Then he further explains that "the conception of non-partisan is understood not as a ban on raising political questions but rather as a privilege for any political 4movement to present to the members its views, lectures, reports, etc."

    The division for organizational work was of the opinion that such a society would cement the radical-progressive elements of the Russian colony in Chicago, and will give them an opportunity to live an interesting social life.

    D. K.

    This article tells of efforts by the Russian Socialist Party to organize non-partisan groups. As the writer proceeds with his report on these efforts, it becomes clear that by non-partisan ...

    Russian
    II D 1, I E, I C
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- February 17, 1916
    More about the Russian Aid Society

    This article confirms the facts as stated in the article of February 2, 1916. The writer tells of a second meeting held January 30, a continuation of the meeting held on January 23, at which it was revealed that the treasurer was elected irregularly, and the opposition succeeded in forcing a re-election. The possibilities of losing their treasurer so disheartened the other officers that they resigned. As a result an entirely new staff of officers was elected at this meeting. The new officers immediately made the society a progressive organization. "Accordingly, the Program Committee was instructed to arrange lectures, literary evenings, etc. Another committee was installed to collect funds for war victims refugees ... all of which has always been the intention of this society, so that when A. Awikovich made this motion everybody responded warmly."

    2

    In conclusion, the members of the R. A. S. are warned to be alert, active, vigilant, lest the reactionaries catch them napping, and again pull off their sinister tricks. Through their frame-ups the most active workers of the organizations were expelled, every progressive was persecuted.

    This article confirms the facts as stated in the article of February 2, 1916. The writer tells of a second meeting held January 30, a continuation of the meeting held ...

    Russian
    II D 1, I C, I E
  • Russkaya Pochta -- May 26, 1917
    Section of the Russian Club Znaniye

    The permanent address of the Russian Club Znaniye is 731 W. 18th Street. The club owns the building, library and reading room. At the library one can get books on different questions by Russian and foreign authors. At the reading room one can use all progressive papers and some magazines in the Russian language. The administration of the club consists of the following persons:

    J. Yerin, President

    M. Nesteruk, Vice-President

    J. Karpuk, Financial Secretary

    I. Sarichov, Records Secretary

    P. Stichuk, Cashier

    B. Glustchuk, Assistant Cashier

    2

    Revisionary Commission:

    A. Shadko

    A. Bernyakovich

    S. Gomsanov

    Household Commission:

    P. Pokhaznikov

    M. Chozko

    R. Tolstyk

    P. Martinovich, Library Director; Dr. A. Krasnow, Doctor of the Club; M. Fridland, attorney for the Club.

    Any person of Russian origin can be a member of the Club Znaniye, 3irrespective of sex, age, nationality and faith.

    Entrance fee $1; monthly membership fee for men, 50 cents, and for women 25 cents. The society has a fund for mutual aid. Any member of the society in case of sickness gets $3 weekly, and in case of death aid is given to the relatives of the member. The society has its doctor and lawyer. The building of the club is open Sunday from 5 P. M.,and during the week, every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 7:30 P. M. During these days everyone who desires to join can get all the information about the constitution of the society. Every Sunday the club arranges lectures on different themes, and free discussions.

    The club has a school of music. String and instrumental music is taught. Lessons are given twice a week: Wednesdays and Fridays. The members of the club are entitled to the music lessons without charge. On May 427, 1917, the Club Znaniye will have an excursion. The excursion at this time will be to the University of Chicago. To the excursion are invited also non-members. At the head of the excursionists there will be competent persons. At the University the excursionists will be guided by Professor Gardner of the University of Chicago. The excursion will be very interesting.

    The permanent address of the Russian Club Znaniye is 731 W. 18th Street. The club owns the building, library and reading room. At the library one can get books on ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g, II D 1, II B 1 a, II B 2 a
  • Russkaya Pochta -- June 16, 1917
    Manifestation of the Russian Independent Society

    The Russian and Ukrainian independent societies showed their power on June 3, 1917, in a parade in which 3,000 persons marched. Passing with flags and banners to the sounds of a march through the Northwest side, they had their massmeeting at Wicker Park Hall. Among the orators were the priests Nikolenko and Popel.

    It is consoling to hear a call to the people from a priest, begging complete unification for the support of the Provisional government of Russia in its hard task. Only a priest who is connected with the Independent Society can say (such words as) "the government of the people, for the people; liberty, equality and brotherhood, freedom of religion; the separation of the church from the government; land to the peasants," etc.

    2

    A not less vigorous speech was made by an American, Clarence Darrow, who said:

    "I greet you here, Russians, brothers of those who have cast off the yoke of tsarism in Russia - brothers of those who made Russia one of the freest countries in the world. Do not forget, comrades, that new free Russia in two months did more for its people than other countries have done in the whole history of their existence. It freed hundreds of thousands of political criminals in Siberia from forced labor and prisons; it proclaimed full freedom of speech, press, conscience and unions; it promised land to those who till it, and (it) makes all necessary preparations for a speedy convocation of a constituent assembly, elected by general and equal suffrage.

    "And this," continued Darrow, "was made by Russia, which everywhere 3they used to call a country of barbarians. There was a time when on all favorable occasions they used to point to Russia. When a policeman was rude to somebody they used to say, He acts as they do in Russia; but time has come when in Petrograd on such occasions they can say, He acts as they do in America.

    "I am against war because it is horrible, but all victims of the present war were redeemed by the freedom attained by Russia. I wish that this war would continue till the full liberation of the whole world."

    Among other things there was an interesting concert program, in which the following participated: Madame Grinevezkaya, the Ukrainian Chorus, Mr. Pokatilov, and others.

    Starik

    The Russian and Ukrainian independent societies showed their power on June 3, 1917, in a parade in which 3,000 persons marched. Passing with flags and banners to the sounds of ...

    Russian
    I E, II D 1, I C