The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- February 18, 1916
    "Fruit of Knowledge" (Club Znaniye)

    Some months ago a new Russian Club was organized in Chicago, and was named KNOWLEDGE (ZNANIYE) its organizer being prelate and the psalm-chanter, Mr. R--ov.

    The fundamental reason or organizing this club was, apparently, the advantage for his holy little business-place, to which the little patriots flocked, and from whom the most honorable Fathers gathered wool.

    The choir for this church was picked from among the club members, who sang very beautifully hymns and songs for a remuneration of kisses, one a-piece, impressed on the forehead by the very Bishop himself.

    One day the little father betook himself with his mission to the nearby suburb Melrose Park, and took his club choir along, to whom it occurred to whip up 2National patriotic feelings by singing "God save the Tsar."

    The listeners began to whistle and to hiss and the singers barely escaped a beating. The choir felt insulted and cleared out. There occurred a second incident, which was even more interesting. These progressive compatriots bethought themselves to give a concert in behalf of refugees, which affair began and ended in true Russian fashion, i. e., in a wholesale drunk--everybody prostrated, "soused," "stewed."

    The collection was large but no account was submitted, although more than a month has passed since the affair.

    One only wonders that our good countrymen, protected by the Russian clergy, singing hymns to the Tsar, should call itself a progressive club!

    Signed,

    Karantinov

    Some months ago a new Russian Club was organized in Chicago, and was named KNOWLEDGE (ZNANIYE) its organizer being prelate and the psalm-chanter, Mr. R--ov. The fundamental reason or organizing ...

    Russian
    III C, II B 2 g, I C
  • Russkaya Pochta -- April 14, 1917
    Excursions organized by the Russian Club "Znanie".

    A new useful idea has been born in the minds of some members of the Club "Znanie". It has been proposed to organize a series of educational excursions to some of the most noteworthy places of Chicago: to museums, universities, parks, stock and other exchanges, etc. The first excursion was to be to the Art Institute. It took place on a Sunday, and Mr. Slonimsky, who was conducting the excursionists, gave explanations about every statue to be admired at the museum.

    It was resolved to arrange such excursions twice every month.

    A new useful idea has been born in the minds of some members of the Club "Znanie". It has been proposed to organize a series of educational excursions to some ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g
  • Russkaya Pochta -- May 26, 1917
    Section of the Russian Club Znaniye

    The permanent address of the Russian Club Znaniye is 731 W. 18th Street. The club owns the building, library and reading room. At the library one can get books on different questions by Russian and foreign authors. At the reading room one can use all progressive papers and some magazines in the Russian language. The administration of the club consists of the following persons:

    J. Yerin, President

    M. Nesteruk, Vice-President

    J. Karpuk, Financial Secretary

    I. Sarichov, Records Secretary

    P. Stichuk, Cashier

    B. Glustchuk, Assistant Cashier

    2

    Revisionary Commission:

    A. Shadko

    A. Bernyakovich

    S. Gomsanov

    Household Commission:

    P. Pokhaznikov

    M. Chozko

    R. Tolstyk

    P. Martinovich, Library Director; Dr. A. Krasnow, Doctor of the Club; M. Fridland, attorney for the Club.

    Any person of Russian origin can be a member of the Club Znaniye, 3irrespective of sex, age, nationality and faith.

    Entrance fee $1; monthly membership fee for men, 50 cents, and for women 25 cents. The society has a fund for mutual aid. Any member of the society in case of sickness gets $3 weekly, and in case of death aid is given to the relatives of the member. The society has its doctor and lawyer. The building of the club is open Sunday from 5 P. M.,and during the week, every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 7:30 P. M. During these days everyone who desires to join can get all the information about the constitution of the society. Every Sunday the club arranges lectures on different themes, and free discussions.

    The club has a school of music. String and instrumental music is taught. Lessons are given twice a week: Wednesdays and Fridays. The members of the club are entitled to the music lessons without charge. On May 427, 1917, the Club Znaniye will have an excursion. The excursion at this time will be to the University of Chicago. To the excursion are invited also non-members. At the head of the excursionists there will be competent persons. At the University the excursionists will be guided by Professor Gardner of the University of Chicago. The excursion will be very interesting.

    The permanent address of the Russian Club Znaniye is 731 W. 18th Street. The club owns the building, library and reading room. At the library one can get books on ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g, II D 1, II B 1 a, II B 2 a
  • Russkaya Pochta -- August 24, 1917
    The Branch of the Society 'Prosvieshchenie' (Enlightenment); its Problems

    The aim of this society is to serve cultural, educational, and social needs, as well as the demands and strivings of all persons of Russian origin in Chicago and suburbs, irrespective of nationality, religion, party, or status; to help raise to a higher level their spiritual, intellectual and social status; to propagate among them a knowledge of the circumstances, problems, and needs of modern life and, as much as possible, to promote closer relations, better acquaintance and understanding between Russia and America.

    The society 'Prosvieshchenie' is non-partisan and progressive, and as such it strives to unify all progressive elements, irrespective of party and outlook, for common cultural, educational, social activity among the masses of the Russian colony in Chicago and suburbs. The motto of 'Prosvieshchenie' is unification, enlightenment and progress.

    The aim of this society is to serve cultural, educational, and social needs, as well as the demands and strivings of all persons of Russian origin in Chicago and suburbs, ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g, I E, I C
  • Russkaya Pochta -- August 24, 1917
    The Branch of the Society 'Prosvieshchenie'; the Platform of the Society 'Prosvieshchenie'

    The society 'Prosvieshchenie' believes in the necessity of a radical change in modern social relations between men, in the necessity of the establishment of a social order founded on the principles of social justice, cooperation and democracy instead of the existing social chaos founded on violence, autocracy and exploitation. The society, nevertheless, believes that any radical change of the modern social relations among men depends on raising the common level and the development of the consciousness of the masses, and on social evolution, not on the parties and their theories. To help this uplift, this development of the consciousness of the masses , to achieve this result under the conditions of our complicated social evolution, within the limits of the problems set forth; and to be guided by the principles of perfect tolerance and freedom of thought while doing such work, - such is the platform on 2which the society Prosvieshchenie stands at present and from which it makes its appeal to the Russian colony in America.

    The secretary of the society Prosvieshchenie was Z. Lossieff. The auditor of the branch of the society is U. Wulbert. The society Prosvieshchenie was organized February 18, 1917. (See Russkaya Pochta, August 17, 1917.)

    The society 'Prosvieshchenie' believes in the necessity of a radical change in modern social relations between men, in the necessity of the establishment of a social order founded on the ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g, I E, I C
  • Russkaya Pochta -- August 31, 1917
    The Branch of the Society 'Prosvieshchenie'; the Constitution of the Society 'Provieshchenie'

    1. The study of the language, history, political and social-economic structure of the country in which we are living.

    2. The study of socialism as the greatest, most serious and scientifically grounded movement of the present time, the thorough acquaintance with which is very necessary to every more or less educated person.

    3. The arrangement of literary-musical evenings and other affairs for the satisfaction of our social and aesthetic needs and demands in these matters.

    1. The study of the language, history, political and social-economic structure of the country in which we are living. 2. The study of socialism as the greatest, most serious and ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g, I E, I C, II B 1 a
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- February 23, 1918
    In the High Rye Is Our Poor Village Lost

    Every time you come to think about the life of our Russians in America, about their organizations and societies, the above line of our poet comes to mind.

    Was it not among the tall stalks of grain, among palaces, mansions, and courts of other nations that the modest life of our compatriots, their organizations, their homes in the poor, forsaken sections, became submerged? Wherever you cast your eye, you see poverty, destitution.

    At a time when life in Russian is, after all, bubbling and gushing, the Russian in America continues in the same old slumbering state.

    2

    Here, too, our land is immense and opulent, now as before, but is devoid of system, even as our native land in the past and now. Of order there is none.

    Chicago and suburbs contain by count 30,000 Russians. How many strong organizations do these 30,000 people have?

    Where is a Russian to look for justice in the bitter hours and days of his life in a strange land? To whom turn for help, with whom hold counsel?

    There are about two or three comparatively strong organizations in all. Even these are as yet young, not yet properly fortified by wisdom and experience. The others are not worth mentioning.

    Out comes some kind of dawn, and before you know it flame is its name, and soon enough it turns firebrand, then ashes, finally nothing.

    3

    At a time when clubs, reading rooms, and social centers are on the increase in other nationalities in the United States, steadily broadening their programs, enlarging and multiplying their influence, the Russian colony is growing richer daily only in the abundance of appeals, in the abundance of conceited words and promises.

    The orator steps upon the platform at a meeting, dispensing promises of all sorts by the ton, but when the time comes to act, he is crestfallen. Where did all the pep go, not even a tiny reading room can we organize, not a place where we can gather in comfort to talk over things. We are scattered, some to the woods, others after kindling.

    Factions and organizations are in such a bundance that even when they call for unity in reality they cause only disunity. Extremely few are those who give true unity. For, disputes and opprobrium do not make for unity, quite to the contrary, they lead to disunity, dissociation.

    4

    What causes all this? Why are we so poor in unity, why such inaptitude for action?

    The key to this enigma lies hidden in the old trouble, not alone of the Russian colony in America, but of Russia proper.

    Those of any intelligence at all are soaking in their own juices. They create small circles, small groups, and there they, so to say, keep enlightening each other, keep learning from each other, and keep feeding their organizations with these same churned-up juices. How much may we expect from a tree nourished by stale juices?

    The Russian national forces are not yet sufficiently roused in America. But seldom does a leader appear from amongst the workers or peasants. Seldom will a Russian colony's "intelligent" comprehend that activity 5must be conducted not within one's own confines but rather should it go forth into the thickest of the masses.

    This is the reason for the eternal sleep from which the life of the nation's masses is perishing. This is why we are such paupers where the blessings from culture are concerned. This is why taverns prosper rather than education, organization, and helpful association.

    It is time that the forces of the Russian intelligentsia in America be ejected from groups and circles, and propelled into the mass-thicket. Enough of that self-gratifying indulgence in eloquent speeches and proclamations.

    To school the scholar is to do harm.

    It is time for the masses of the Russian colony to think better of its 6lot, of its inadequate knowledge, and of the harm from disunity. It is time that these masses give attention to useful books, and that close contact be established with persons and organizations calling to unity and organization.

    When these requirements are fulfilled, our colony will not be so deficient.

    Then shall we not be so defenceless.

    Then shall we not be so disorganized.

    Then shall we stand up in behalf of ourselves and others.

    Every time you come to think about the life of our Russians in America, about their organizations and societies, the above line of our poet comes to mind. Was it ...

    Russian
    I C, II D 1, II B 2 a, II B 2 g
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- February 23, 1918
    Russian Youth Alliance

    Dear comrades! There exists at present in the city of Chicago a new organization called the Russian Youth Alliance. The Aim of this organization is to unite all young Russian immigrants of Chicago and suburbs into one society which will offer a useful educational program, as well as other cultural facilities and entertainments.

    In addition to these objectives, the Russian Youth Alliance will establish a library for its members and for outsiders as well. Also a dramatic circle and an orchestra will be organized. Classes in singing and dancing, lectures, etc., will be conducted.

    The Russian Youth Alliance will also give financial assistance, legal advice, and medical care for members in cases of illness, injuries, or death.

    2

    Forty-two members joined this organization at the initial gathering.

    The Russian Youth Alliance is non-partisan and will analyze the programs of the several political parties now at grips in Russia, elucidating the truth about them impartially.

    The Russian Youth Alliance invites all Ukrainians from Russia and Galicia to attend meetings of the alliance and to join it. This alliance was founded in 1917 (December 10).

    The Committee.

    Dear comrades! There exists at present in the city of Chicago a new organization called the Russian Youth Alliance. The Aim of this organization is to unite all young Russian ...

    Russian
    III E, II B 2 g, II B 1 a
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- September 16, 1922
    A Lecture

    The Educational Society has arranged a lecture on astronomy by a student of the University of Chicago, on Sept. 17, 1922, at 3 P. M., 1080 W. 14th Street.

    The Educational Society has arranged a lecture on astronomy by a student of the University of Chicago, on Sept. 17, 1922, at 3 P. M., 1080 W. 14th Street.

    Russian
    II B 2 g
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- May 26, 1923
    Lecture

    On May 27, 1923, at 3 P. M., at the House of Enlightenment, 1080 W. 14th Street, S. Prokopov will lecture on the theme: "The Industrial Revolution (Inventions, Poverty, Political Philosophy, Marxism, Anarchism, and Syndicalism)."

    Beginning at 3 P. M. sharp. Admission free of charge.

    On May 27, 1923, at 3 P. M., at the House of Enlightenment, 1080 W. 14th Street, S. Prokopov will lecture on the theme: "The Industrial Revolution (Inventions, Poverty, Political ...

    Russian
    II B 2 g