The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- November 15, 1913
    On the People's Health

    This article, from the editor's office, discusses the value and the need for a health feature in this Russian weekly, and because there is ample evidence of both the value and the need, such a feature, entitled "The People's Health," has been established. It is to be managed by Dr. H. R. Krasnow. The purpose of this feature is to define in non-scientific, popular language, and in concise form, various diseases. Much space in that feature is to be devoted to answering questions sent by the readers pertaining preservation of health and prevention of disease. It is stressed that inasmuch as the objective of the Russian in America "is to unite the Russian masses, to educate them, and to furnish them authentic information," it is therefore indeed very gratifying to be able to inform them that this publication has invited Dr. H. R. Krasnow to be in charge of the "People's Health."

    2

    Dr. Krasnow's lectures on this subject in various organizations for the past four years have proved of great help to the masses. It is therefore a certainty that his informative articles on health, at a time when the dearth for honest, unselfish medical advice, particularly for the foreigner, is on everybody's lips, will come at the right time, and will be welcomed."

    The editor reminds his readers that "at a time when one is ambitious to dabble in problems of flood control, the origin of earthquakes, the principles of wireless telegraphy, etc., one surely wishes to obtain knowledge on the elementary principles of the mechanism of his very own human machine, - the body."

    This article, from the editor's office, discusses the value and the need for a health feature in this Russian weekly, and because there is ample evidence of both the value ...

    Russian
    II D 3, II B 2 d 1
  • Tropinka (Pathway) -- October 01, 1914
    The Difficulties of a Russian Press in Chicago.

    "It is not easy to start an organ wherever one wishes. Especially, of course in Russia. The censor, prohibitions, arrests--all these face those who wish to publish anything. Therefore, in Russia there can be no complaint with the lack of sympathy. While here in the country of freedom of speech, people who have foresaken Russia in this struggle for freedom of speech, upon the first effort at this selfsame freedom, fall into ways which recall involuntarily the words of our poet: 'In place of the chains of serfdom, men have laid on other chains'.

    Is it not strange? In a 'free' country people hinder the printed word. Strange but true.

    Conservatism, skeptical smiles, ugly predictions are met at the very first attempt at publication. That is why in such a city as Chicago, with a large Russian population, with a considerable number of political emigrants and intelligentsia in general, there have been up to now neither Russian papers or Russian magazines, while every Russian organ, every printed word of Russian, is literally gobbled up."

    "It is not easy to start an organ wherever one wishes. Especially, of course in Russia. The censor, prohibitions, arrests--all these face those who wish to publish anything. Therefore, in ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1, I C
  • Russkaya Pochta -- October 12, 1917
    Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circulation, Etc. Required by the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912 of the Russian Post, Published Weekly at Chicago, Illinois, for October 1st, 1917 State of Illinois County of Cook

    Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and county aforesaid, personally appeared A. Pokatiloff, who, having been sworn according to law, deposes and says that he is the Editor of the Russian Post and that the following is, to the best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, management, etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act of August 24,1912, embodied in section 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to wit:

    1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing editor, and business manager are:

    Publisher The Russian Publishing Co., 2407 W. Division St., Chicago, Ill.; Editor, Anatoly Pokatiloff, 2125 N. Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Ill.; 2Managing Editor, Anatoly Pokatiloff, 2125 N. Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Ill.; Business Manager, Nicolas Klekner, 2919 W. Division St., Chicago, Ill.

    2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses of individual owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the names and addresses of stockholders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of the total amount of stock.), Anatoly Pokatiloff, 2125 N. Maplewood Ave., Chicago, Ill.; Nicholas Klekner, 2919 W. Division St., Chicago, Ill.

    3. That the known bondholders, mortgages, and other security holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: (if there are none, so state.) Intertype Corporation, Brooklyn, N. Y.; American Type Founders Co., Chicago, Ill.; Keystone Type Foundry Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

    Anatoly Pokatiloff

    Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day of September, 1917

    Simon Osgood

    (My commission expires Sept. 11, 1919)

    Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and county aforesaid, personally appeared A. Pokatiloff, who, having been sworn according to law, deposes and says that he is ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Russkaya Zhizn -- May 04, 1918
    To the Readers of the Paper Russkaya Zhyn

    Being the only progressive and popular Russian paper in Chicago, Russkaya Zhizn is of service to all organizations, and to the individual members of the Russian colony in their spiritual needs, independent of their political viewpoints or religious creed.

    "Our aim is to elevate the cultural level of our compatriots.

    "We call upon all thinking and progressive people in the colony to help us in this worthy, edifying task.

    (Signed) Publishers of Russkaya Zhizn."

    Being the only progressive and popular Russian paper in Chicago, Russkaya Zhizn is of service to all organizations, and to the individual members of the Russian colony in their spiritual ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Russkoye Slovo -- June 30, 1919
    Krasnow Scrapbooks Russians in America; Letters and Correspondence; Who Will Lift the Veil from This Mystery?

    This article, signed V. M-in, challenges "the oscillating little paper in Chicago Svobodnaya Rossiya on its about face from a Menshevik to a Bolshevist paper.

    The writer begins by wondering who directs the destinies of Russia in leading her over sloping planes. These troubled reflections originate in a letter from Russia (from an American correspondent) about the man Shatov, who is in the limelight in the USSR, who is making statements on behalf of the proletariat, that the proletariat will fight to a finish, etc.

    2

    The writer remembers Willie Shatov, who was quite often tipsy and in this condition depended on the support of the Chicago lamp posts.

    And now this American correspondent demonstrates the paradise for working men and peasants in Russia through Shatov, the indigent drunkard who is at the top now.

    The writer finds solace in the assumption that the correspondent really did not intend this stuff for the Russians here, who know better, who know that the factories in Russia are at a standstill, and half of the soil untilled.

    But what he is after is to find out by what means did ambassador Martens so completely bewitch Svobodnaya Rossiya, whose editor, an erstwhile Menshevik, "turned around and was changed" into a Bolshevik.

    3

    The writer finishes his reflections with a rather unequivocal insinuation that "times are hard." "Everything is high, and one encounters all sorts of difficulties."

    It would, therefore, seem that he is now quite satisfied to have solved the riddle: the editor was bought.

    This article, signed V. M-in, challenges "the oscillating little paper in Chicago Svobodnaya Rossiya on its about face from a Menshevik to a Bolshevist paper. The writer begins by wondering ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1, I E, IV
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- July 09, 1919
    Workingmen and Peasants

    This is a frantic appeal to join the Workmen and Peasants Free Russia Cooperative as a means of supporting the newspaper of that name, Svobodnaya Rossiya. This daily, it is pointed out, is of utmost importance as a support to the revolution in Russia. Soviet Russia is living through great, trying days. We should be happy to have such daily paper as Svobodnaya Rossiya. Its future depends on you, readers! Capitalists and Kolchakists wish to drown in a spoon of water any medium of the people, which stands up for the Soviets........Without this paper who will interpret correctly the people's cause for liberty? Who will raise his voice in protest against all sorts of vile insults to the poor Russian workmen and peasants? Remember that each one, by doing his bit, has his say in all the affairs of the cooperative. The word cooperative means just this: the people's enterprise, and the 2people shall conduct it as they like... He who is against the Soviets and is for capital, landowners, bishops, generals and tsarist officials should stay out, his money is not desired here; let him take it to the slave drivers of yore. We need the support of those toiling poor who wish to preserve the conquest of the rights of the people.

    This is a frantic appeal to join the Workmen and Peasants Free Russia Cooperative as a means of supporting the newspaper of that name, Svobodnaya Rossiya. This daily, it is ...

    Russian
    I E, III H, II B 2 d 1
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- September 16, 1922
    (No headline)

    Colos Truzshenika, (Laborers' Voice), the paper of the Russian Industrialists of the world, is in financial straits. Until now this paper appeared twice a week; now it will come out whenever financial means will permit.

    Colos Truzshenika, (Laborers' Voice), the paper of the Russian Industrialists of the world, is in financial straits. Until now this paper appeared twice a week; now it will come out ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1, I E
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- January 29, 1923
    Books Sold by Svobodnaya Rossiya

    An advertisement in this issue concerns books for sale. It reads:

    Svobodnaya Rossiya's bookstore will deliver a great variety of books in the Russian language, published in America or abroad, at very low prices, provided a deposit of ten per cent of the price of the book is made upon ordering.

    The following are samples of books offered: Selected works of L. Andreyev, such as Red Laughter; Twentieth Century Anthology of Russian Poetry, in two volumes; Balmont's Selected Verses. Among others are the works of such great masters as Gorky, Goncharov, Tolstoy, Turgeneff, Griboyedov, Gogol, Gershensohn, also non-Russians, such as Marx and Bebel.

    2

    Dr. H. R. Krasnow's book on health is also offered. The address given was The Russian Publishing Company, Inc., 1722 W. Chicago Ave., 9Chicago, Ill.

    An advertisement in this issue concerns books for sale. It reads: Svobodnaya Rossiya's bookstore will deliver a great variety of books in the Russian language, published in America or abroad, ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 2, II B 2 d 1
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- April 17, 1923
    (No headline)

    Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circulation, Etc., Required by the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912, of the daily Free Russia Published Daily at Chicago, Illinois, for October 1, 1922.

    State of Illinois)

    County of Cook) S. S.

    Before me, a Notary Public in and for the State and county aforesaid, personally appeared George Sawicki, who having been duly sworn according to law, deposes and says that he is the business manager of the daily Free Russia, and that the following is to the best of his knowledge and belief a true statement of the ownership, management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in Section 443, Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to wit:

    1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing 2editor, and business manager are:

    Publisher: Russian Publishing Company, Inc., 1722 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, Ill.; editor: S. Scheinman, 1722 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, Ill.; managing editor: none; business manager: George Sawicki, 1722 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, Ill.

    2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses of individual owners, or, if a corporation, give its name and the names of stockholders owning or holding one per cent or more of the total amount of stock.)

    The Russian National Orthodox Society, 917 N. Wood St., Chicago, Ill.; John Dzidz, President, 917 N. Wood St., Chicago, Ill.; Onufry Bitzko, Secretary, 917 N. Wood St., Chicago, Ill.

    3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding one per cent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: (If there are none, so state.) None.

    ....

    3

    5. That the average number of copies of each issue of this publication sold or distributed, through the mails or otherwise, to paid subscribers during the six months preceding the date shown above is 3,000 copies. (This information is required from daily publications only.)

    George Sawicki, Business Manager

    Sworn to and subscribed before me this 25th day of April, 1923.

    (SEAL)

    Anton O. Landes

    Notary Public

    (My commission expires April 26, 1926.)

    Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circulation, Etc., Required by the Act of Congress of August 24, 1912, of the daily Free Russia Published Daily at Chicago, Illinois, for October 1, ...

    Russian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Svobodnaya Rossiya -- September 22, 1923
    Join the People's Organization

    There are many Russian organizations in Chicago. Each of them has its own definite aims: one is occupied with aid to Russia, another with the opening of schools, a third has as its aim enlightenment, and so forth. Among these organizations only the People's Independent Society, in addition to other aims, also takes care that the people of Russian origin in case of misfortune can find the necessary aid. For this aim the Independent Society established a fund of mutual aid and insurance. They were created in consequence of daily needs. As with people of other nationalities, so the Russians are exposed to different misfortunes:one gets crippled by a machine, another gets sick during his hard work, the third loses his normal sight and so forth. Many such workers are left without any means for their existence. Also the families of many deceased Russian people are often left without 2any means. Each member of the Independent Society who pays $1.80 monthly, in case of sickness or misfortune receives weekly five dollars for a six-month period. In case of death the family receives $800. This society does not limit itself to this work only. Through the efforts of the members of this society the only (Russian) paper in Chicago, Free Russia, was established. This paper defends the interests of the Russian colony and the Russian workers in America.

    The society has spent on this paper many thousands of dollars and much work. Besides this, the society has a school. Russians! Join the People's Russian Organization. Insure yourselves in it; protect yourselves against misfortune and secure relief for your family in case of your death. Insure your children in it. All nationalities are supporting such organizations. Support your organization.

    I. A. Dzydz, President

    There are many Russian organizations in Chicago. Each of them has its own definite aims: one is occupied with aid to Russia, another with the opening of schools, a third ...

    Russian
    II D 1, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 f, I C