The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    Meeting in Honor of Haymarket Martyrs

    The magazine called the attention of its readers to the memorial meeting in honor of "the first martyrs of socialism in America." The editor of the Arbeiter-Zeitung and the widow of Parsons were to speak.

    The magazine called the attention of its readers to the memorial meeting in honor of "the first martyrs of socialism in America." The editor of the Arbeiter-Zeitung and the widow ...

    Russian
    I E
  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    The Campaign against the Russo-American Treaty.

    "For us Russians the most important event of the past two weeks has been the publication of the Russian-American Treaty." The writer then gives in a few words the history of attempts to negotiate such a treaty from 1873 to 1886. "Using the panic of the bourgeoisie which followed the events in Chicago in 1886, Russian officials renewed their underground machinations. Until taken up by the Russians the business remained in embryo. The treaty failed in the Senate. Its further history is already known to our readers. At the present time there is in progress active preparation for a new campaign against the treaty. In New York there has been formed an American "Society for Suppression of the Treaty", in Chicago likewise agitation has arisen. . . . The Russian-American League here opens its activity with a public Russian meeting on Saturday in the hall of the Progressive Club, Santer's Hall, corner Johnson and 14th Sts." (The text of the treaty is appended).

    "For us Russians the most important event of the past two weeks has been the publication of the Russian-American Treaty." The writer then gives in a few words the history ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I E, I C
  • Progress, Literaturno-Politicheskoye Obozrenie -- June 28, 1893
    The Russo-American Treaty.

    The magazine denounces the treaty entered into by the United States and Russia which provided for the extradition of criminals. It was feared that it would be used against Russian revolutionaries. "This convention, at the present time and in such a form, is nothing more than an official declaration of the sympathy of the American Government for the Russian Tsar. But back of the American Government there is still the American People."

    "Everywhere Russian immigrants have had the opportunity to arouse public discussion of the treaty the masses have shown themselves to be against it. We cannot call a halt. The treaty must and shall be annulled. Republicans and democrats alike are responsible; the negotiations began under Cleveland, the treaty was ratified by a republican senate with the aid of democratic votes (without which the two-thirds majority could not have been reached). The exchange of ratifications was carried out by Cleveland and Gresham, who insolently laughed at the protests of public opinion. The Russian citizens of America are bound to settle accounts with the venal tsarist satellites at the approaching elections. Russian Jews who vote for 2the republicans will vote for the Russian Tsar, for a system of political, religious and national intolerance, for the persecution of five millions of the Jewish masses. Such a Jewish republican or Jewish democrat every honest man will brand with the shameful name of Judas."

    The magazine denounces the treaty entered into by the United States and Russia which provided for the extradition of criminals. It was feared that it would be used against Russian ...

    Russian
    III B 1, I E, I C
  • Record-Herald -- January 23, 1905
    Will Die for Liberty

    Chicago Russians, Russian Jews, and Poles and not a few Americans last night wildly acclaimed Mme. Katherine Bereshkovsky agent and representative of the Russian revolutionary propaganda. At the West Side Auditorium, Taylor and Center St. the spacious hall was filled to its seating capacity long before the time set for the meeting, while in the street outside surged many hundreds struggling for admission. Two policemen vainly attempted to control the crowd, which, despite the fact that the sale of tickets was stopped, forced its way into the hall.

    The punctuations of applause and cheering during the address of Mme. Bereshkovsky were echoed by the throng in the street, and at the conclusion of her speech in the hall Mme. Bereshkovsky addressed an open-air overflow meeting.

    2

    She spoke in Russian and without incendiary utterances, recited the wrongs of the Russian people and told of the progress of the revolutionary movement during the last forty years. She frequently was interrupted by cheering, and at the close of the meeting, as the gray-haired speaker seated herself on the floor of the stage, with her feet in the footlight trench, hundreds struggled to shake her hand, while cheer after cheer was given.

    Judge E. O. Brown, who presided at the meeting, was the only one to make reference to the sanguinary events of the day in St. Petersburg, none of the speakers having learned the details of the uprising. For a moment after he announced the report that many of their countrymen had fallen before the attacks of the troops, intense silence reigned, and then the audience burst into cheers for the revolution and hisses for the Romanoff dynasty.

    "I feel that my place is now in Russia "declared Mme. Bereshkovsky, in opening her address "The important epoch has arrived. In Russian prisons are perishing thousands who have worked and hoped for the event which now is transpiring.

    3

    For forty years this agitation has been carried on with the object of teaching the masses the true state of affairs in Russia.

    Russians, Poles, Jews, Finns and other subjects of the Czar have been horribly maltreated, as all the world knows.

    "At last the important moment has arrived for the nation to arise and demand political freedom. Now all are ready to die for the cause. The uprising will not be confined to St. Petersburg, but in every portion of Russia, in cities and villages, millions will join in the protest.

    "Many here in America and in other nations no doubt believed the Russians were not far above cattle intellectually. The world did not know the development that was going forward, until one fine morning the nations were astonished to learn that an open protest had been made. But to Russians it was no revelation. All knew that the supreme moment was coming, and now that the critical moment is here, all parties and nationalities in Russia are united for the one purpose.

    4

    Czar Nicholas has shown himself near-sighted and foolish not to have realized what the result would be.

    "But we must have sympathy and aid. America must sooner or later speak, and with the aid of free nations our task will be easier. We appeal to the nations of the world to help us appose tyranny. Forty years ago we were only a handful, now every class of people in every province is organized for the final blow. Many are in prison, many have perished, but as by magic thousands, tens of thousands, have risen to take their places in aid of the cause.

    "My purpose in coming here is to tell you these things, not because our organization is weak, but because we need sympathy and support and we will get it by letting the world know the truth. Many in this country are ready and willing to return to Russia and sacrifice their lives if need be to help free the nation from tyranny. The Czar is not what he has been pictured he is a weakling.

    5

    Our dream is soon to be realized. The time for the final blow is here."

    Peter Sissmann, an attorney, spoke in Yiddish, appealing for financial aid for the revolution.

    Miss Jane Addams spoke of Tolstoy's prediction of a passive revolution and said the time had come for the Russians to demonstrate the new conception of freedom and brotherhood.

    "Three things are asked," she said- "freedom of speech, a free assembly and abolition of autocracy.

    All America can stand for these three things, and liberty lovers throughout the world can side with the movement."

    Dr. Theodore B. Sachs, who translated Mme. Bereshkovsky's speech into English, added on his own behalf that as a Russian Jew he had prayed daily for the success of the revolutionary movement.

    "As Russian Jews" he said "we love Russia, but we abhor the Russian government."

    6

    Clarence S. Darrow, who had been announced to speak, was out of the city, and Jenkin LLoyd Jones was absent on account of a cold.

    Chicago Russians, Russian Jews, and Poles and not a few Americans last night wildly acclaimed Mme. Katherine Bereshkovsky agent and representative of the Russian revolutionary propaganda. At the West Side ...

    Russian
    I E
  • Record-Herald -- January 27, 1905
    Asks Cash for Bombs.

    "Such assassinations as that of Von Plevhe cost money, and the Russian patriots lack the funds to carry on this work," said Bronisliv Slavinsky, editor of the Polish Rabotnick, a Socialist paper, at a banquet for Mme. Breshkovski, the Russian exile, at the Lessing Clubhouse last night.

    "Mme Breshkovski has been a champion of the Russian masses for more than thirty years, many of which she spent in prison." Mr. Slavinsky continued, "and she expects to see reform accomplished or to fall in the struggle.

    The present revolution had its origin in a peaceful movement which the government of Russia would not permit to continue. There is an old Russian legend which says that from the bones of those who, perish an avenger will arise! But we lack funds to carry on the work and appeal to all liberty-loving persons to contribute as liberally as they can."

    2

    After Mr. Slavinsky's address a petition was circulated and a considerable sum of money raised for Mme. Breshkovski, who also made an address, saying she was about to return to Russia, where her presence was needed. She said that when she started for this country she thought revolution and political reform to be far in the future. "Now I think reform will come soon," she added.

    Peter Sissman, in making a pleas for funds, said:

    "We want a battle- not a 'battle' like that of last Sunday at St. Petersburg.

    To accomplish this end we must have a mint.

    You must make sacrifices and give up funds for this purpose."

    The sale of boxes for the public meeting to be held at 3:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Auditorium under the auspices of the Friends of Russian Freedom is progressing rapidly, and the indications are that the capacity of the big theater will be tested. Aside from Mme. Breshkovski, who will be the principal speaker, addresses will be made by Miss Jane Addams, Dr. Emil G. Hirsch and Jenkin LLoyd Jones.

    "Such assassinations as that of Von Plevhe cost money, and the Russian patriots lack the funds to carry on this work," said Bronisliv Slavinsky, editor of the Polish Rabotnick, a ...

    Russian
    I E
  • Record-Herald -- November 02, 1905
    Sympathy for Russ Rebels. Chicagoans Indorse Revolution and Congratulate Leaders.

    Russia's dawning freedom was the theme of speakers who addressed a mass meeting under the auspices of the Russian Social Democratic party and the Chicago branch of the bund, in Apollo Hall, 256 Blue Island Ave. last night. Five hundred former subjects of the Czar were present.

    Resolutions of sympathy with the revolutionists of Russia were adopted, as follows:

    Whereas: The Russian despotic government is the bulwark of all the reactionary forces of the world and the foes of civilization; and

    Whereas: The defeat of Russians despotism will be a blow of reaction and oppression everywhere and an inspiration to all who are fighting for freer institutions and better conditions of life; and

    2

    Whereas: The defeat of Russian people led by the classconscious proletariat, are now engaged in a heoric struggle to wipe out of existance Russian autocracy - the last vestige of feudalism - which is a disgrace to our so much vaunted 20th century; therefore be it

    Resolved, That we extend our sympathy and congratulations to our heroic comrades who have so bravely raised the banner of revolution, determined to obtain liberty or die fighting for it; and be it further

    Resolved, That we pledge our moral and financial aid to our Russian Comrades in their heoric struggle for Russia's freedom.

    The speakers were Dr. A. J. Dubin; Charles H. Kerr, and Peter Sissman.

    Russia's dawning freedom was the theme of speakers who addressed a mass meeting under the auspices of the Russian Social Democratic party and the Chicago branch of the bund, in ...

    Russian
    I E
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- December 05, 1912
    Organization of Russian Workers' Club

    "About two months ago there was organized here a Russian workers' group which had as its motto 'the liberation of the workers is the affair of the workers themselves.' The intelligentsia here do not belong."

    Gr. Krasnow (Dr. H. R. Krasnow)

    "About two months ago there was organized here a Russian workers' group which had as its motto 'the liberation of the workers is the affair of the workers themselves.' The ...

    Russian
    I E
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- December 05, 1912
    Founding of Society for Aid to Political Prisoners and Exiles in Russia

    "Here must be considered the founding, only three or four months ago, of the Society for Aid to Political Prisoners and Exiles in Russia. At the present time this society has already around 150 members; each of them works valiantly for the good of this organization. This can be seen from the great financial success of the recent undertaking which brought in around $300. The question of exile has now begun to interest the Russian colony in America. It is hoped that in the future Russians in America will work to make such organizations flourish, the need of which is only too clear for every thoughtful man."

    Gr. Krasnow (Dr. H. R. Krasnow)

    "Here must be considered the founding, only three or four months ago, of the Society for Aid to Political Prisoners and Exiles in Russia. At the present time this society ...

    Russian
    I E, II D 10
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- May 18, 1914
    On Methods of Organizing American Russia.

    Ivan Gorsky, in developing his conception of how the Russian colonies in American should be organized (and who should organize them) shows much clear, practical thinking.

    This question of organizing American Russia was the topic of the day at that time (May, 1914) in the Russkoye Slovo, and Gorsky, begins his letter by objecting to the question "whether organization is at all necessary, and if so should it be of an ecclesiastical or in any way of a religious nature". He feels that it was poor strategy to pose the question thusly. He asserts that the Russian immigration is chiefly a peasant immigration. No industrial workers, no bourgeoisic- entirely raw material, without any political credo; illiterate.

    Gorsky therefore contends that it would be foolish "to entertain notions that the peasants, in their present state of mind on realities would flock to any type of organization". He further shows, and with much insight, that a considerable amount of petty organizational detail 2work would be necessary as foundation,- "and only organizations with material aid in them would insure everybody's sympathy".

    Gorsky boldly states his view on the absurdity of inviting everyone who is desirous of organizing American Russia, irrespective of convictions held by these people. "In my opinion the progressive elements of the Russian Colonies must join their efforts to create a type of a progressive peasant-Industrial organization with Cultural-Educational objectives on the one hand, and material mutual aid on the other hand, not without its Bureau of Information and broad propaganda chiefly on farm labor". Further,-- "Inasmuch as the fates have transformed the peasantry here into Industrial workers their interests are, as a result, bound-up with the interests of the American proletariat, and it is imperative that they go hand-in-hand with the American Trade-Unions." He demands that the leaders of thought in the colony do not hobnob with reactionary Russian forces here: "Inasmuch as the organizations will be progressive they must fight the enemies of progress, tsarist agents and satellites, the well-groomed black-hundreds, whose chief slogan is 'slug the Jew, the alien, and the intellectual'". The job of organizing must be done by 3progressives only, whatever their particular leaning as a progressive may be. He further suggests that while the organization is primarily for industrialized peasants and, as such, is chiefly a 'Russian and National organization' yet this should not mean "Nationalistic" - other nationalities should not be barred from membership if they desire to make themselves useful to the Russian Colony.

    In conclusion, Gorsky summarizes the situation thus:-

    a. "Before developing the viewpoints of Krapotkin or Marx to the Russian Muzhik it is necessary to teach him reading, writing, and at least a little of thinking."Afterwards one may go ahead and "treat the peasant to the luxuries of collectivism and communistic anarchism".

    b. That progressive non-partisan organizations will have greater success because they are more popular, more lasting, better attended.He also urges autonomy for each organization.

    (Note; This article shows the difficulties facing Russian organizations.)

    Ivan Gorsky, in developing his conception of how the Russian colonies in American should be organized (and who should organize them) shows much clear, practical thinking. This question of organizing ...

    Russian
    I C, II D 1, I E
  • Krasnow Scrapbooks -- June 04, 1914
    (Correspondence) On Organizing.

    This article signed for Russian Immigrants, written in a rasping, biting style, It is another expression on the topic of Methods of organizing American Russia. The opening sentence is typical of the exasperated, but intelligent Russian. He arraigns the local leaders of the colony for their large intentions but small achievements.

    "Already for seven or eight years the idea of self-help organization, akin to the "Arbeiter Ring", has been hovering among the Russian laborers; many of them are members of Jewish, Irish, or German organizations", because one of their own is, as yet, non-existent.

    He does not deny the fact (as he sees it) - that the Russian immigrants, chiefly peasents, need an organization which would first and foremost help him materially. The Russian immigrant needs a job,needs practical advice, needs protection, language, then, in most difficult moments he needs assistance in cash.In this direction, organization should -2be steered... What nonsense to meditate on nationalism under such conditions. Russia has numerous nationalities, and if organizers will stress one to the exclusion or neglect of the other, such an organization will die at birth".

    Should the organization be ecclesiastical? Those who have such needs will be ministered to for a small consideration in Temples of religion specially designed for such purposes....The same may be said of the importance of political leanings in organizations.-- "I can be a socialist, an anarchist, a monarchist, a republican, and at the same time a member of a sport-club or be insured in any Insurance Company I may choose. Why cannot I, a socialist, be a member of an organization, whose goal it is to extend material and moral assistance to Russian immigrants"?

    The writer asks his compatriots why they could not accomplish, what Germans, Italians, Irish, Finnish, Letts, etc., have long since 3accomplished... "It would seem that we alone are incapable of even imitating those others,- we are so busy caucusing, cursing or worshipping those worthless little deities, which we have brought along with us from our half-savage fatherland".

    In conclusion, the writer apparently somewhat relieved from the accumulated pressure, gives somewhat more moderate council saying, that "if an organization with far-reaching objectives is beyond the strength of those who started it why not be content with a more Bureau of Information, just so that you steer in the beginning for the strictly material needs of the population instead of cultural educational. Unemployed, hungry,--one thinks little of culture. Without anchor, entirely dependent on chance one does inquire into universities, but after some degree of material security. Schools, universities, -- they can only be next in importance".

    This article signed for Russian Immigrants, written in a rasping, biting style, It is another expression on the topic of Methods of organizing American Russia. The opening sentence is typical ...

    Russian
    I C, II D 1, I E