The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- February 12, 1890
    [Many Poles Die from Influenza]

    Many of the dead in the Central states from the epidemic of influenza which carried off twelve hundred and eight people in Chicago alone between December 23, 1889 and February 1, 1890, were Polish, according to a statement of Dr. Xelowski, a member of the Board of Health.

    Many of the dead in the Central states from the epidemic of influenza which carried off twelve hundred and eight people in Chicago alone between December 23, 1889 and February ...

    Polish
    I M, IV, II A 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 02, 1891
    Polish Activities Polish Democrats Hold Meeting

    Last night, Polish Democrats held a political meeting at the Polish hall on Bradley Street. Last Monday there was also a political meeting held by Polish Democrats at Walsh's Hall, located at Milwaukee Avenue and Noble Street. As we have already reported, the hall was only half filled. We thought that this happened because many persons were not aware of the meeting. For this reason, in the Saturday issue of our journal, we called the special attention of our readers to last night's meeting. In spite of this, the Polish hall at Bradley Street was only half filled. It is very sad that the Poles are so little interested in politics, in which they should take an active part, because it is for their own good and the good of the working class.

    Mr. August J. Kowalski opened the meeting by inviting Mr. Peter Kiolbassa to 2speak; he was greeted by a storm of applause. The latter made a suggestion, which was accepted, that Francis Wleklinski be made secretary.

    Mr. Peter Kiolbassa began his speech as follows: "Let us vote a straight Democratic ticket and show our strength. Let us remember that there are many intrigants in the Republican party; not only intrigants but also enemies of our faith. With these we must struggle, and we wish to conquer them. Every citizen of Chicago has his privileges, but he also has his obligations. It is the duty of every Pole to vote for a candidate friendly towards us and from whom the working class can expect some help later on. There are candidates on the Democratic ticket who are friendly towards us despite the fact that they belong to a different nationality. These candidates should get every Polish vote." Mr. Kiolbassa's speech was received with a great applause.

    The next speaker was Alderman [Stanley] Kunz of the Sixteenth Ward. He made special reference to the election of aldermen and commissioners by stating 3that five delegates are elected from every precinct and these later on nominate the candidates. Therefore, every Pole should know for whom he is going to vote. The next speaker was Mr. Cooley, who was followed by Mr. Bogle. As both were candidates for trustees of the Sanitary District, their speeches were alike. "All contagious diseases, such as typhoid fever, diphtheria, scarlet fever, etc., are caused by contaminated water. We throw into the river all kinds of rubbish, which flows into the lake from which we drink water. If we construct a sanitary canal to the Mississippi River, the polluted water will be diverted into the river, and this will purify the drinking water and avert many diseases. Secondly, if we construct such a canal, commerce will increase, for the canal will be navigable, and, since transportation by water is cheaper than by railroad, trade would increase." Both candidates assured us that if we elect them drainage trustees, they will force through the provision which provides for the building of this canal.

    Mr. Kiolbassa spoke once more. He said, "It is reported that someone by the 4name of John P. Farwell is supposed to have said that no foreigner should hold a public office or be allowed to vote. And who made John P. Farwell rich? Foreigners, of course. Who are the biggest swindlers, foreigners or those who were born here? The latter, of course. Who fought for the independence of the United States if not the foreigners? Show us citizens more loyal than the Poles, of whom the majority were born in the old country. They pay their taxes without murmuring, elect their public officials honestly, and when it is necessary to defend the adopted country, a Pole is first to give a helping hand." These words penetrated very deeply into the hearts of the listeners, who expressed their approval at the end of the talk by hearty applause.

    The next speakers were John S. Cooper, candidate for president of the County Board; Mr. Wall, candidate for County Commissioner; Mr. Rolan, Mr. McDonald, and Mr. Kowalski.

    As one of the speakers attacked the Irish and carried it too far, Mr. Kiolbassa 5took the liberty of defending them, for they were recently very friendly towards the Poles and proved it by furnishing a bond for Mr. Kiolbassa in the sum of seven million dollars [see note]. Therefore, we should respect and support the Irish as our friends.

    As it was quite late and neither Mr. De Witt C. Cregier nor Mr. Harrison had arrived, Mr. Kiolbassa adjourned the meeting.

    (Translator's note: According to Mr. Jozwiakowski, one of the editors [of Dziennik Chicagoski], who knew Mr. Peter Kiolbassa, the Irish Catholics--Democrats--wished to show the Republicans that they wanted Kiolbassa, a Catholic, and to prove it they signed a seven-million-dollar bond. It is understood that it was a real-estate bond.)

    Last night, Polish Democrats held a political meeting at the Polish hall on Bradley Street. Last Monday there was also a political meeting held by Polish Democrats at Walsh's Hall, ...

    Polish
    I F 5, III C, III D, I F 1, I F 6, I C, I M, IV
  • Zgoda -- August 14, 1892
    New Gymnastic Society for Young Polish Women

    There was organized in the northwest part of Chicago a Polish gymnastic society for young Polish women. Its practical uses are extensive. The organizers of this new society are concerned above all about the beneficial results derived from it for the health of Polish women, who sometimes work hard and waste their strength. Secondly, it is our intention to furnish our young ladies pleasant exercise, in their own circle, and above that, awaken in their hearts and souls the desire for higher accomplishments through elevating the spirit by mutual work for the good of all.

    I appeal to you, sisters, and beseech you to join our circle for mutual benefit; let us convince all that we do not remain in slumber. We will direct our work toward national aims. Let the wings of the "Falcon" be our protection. The next meeting will take place September 18, 1892, at 5 P.M. in Greenwald's Hall, at Holt avenue. In this hall we have our gymnastic exercises every Wednesday, beginning at 8 o'clock.

    2

    In the name of the committee I have the honor to request the Polish young women for their kindly attendance at the above named meeting and also for their presence at the gymnastic exercises for the purpose of witnessing both.

    You may register as a member of our circle during the exercises at the regular meeting, held every Wednesday during the first three months. At present, during the organization of this society, the new members may register free of charge.

    There was organized in the northwest part of Chicago a Polish gymnastic society for young Polish women. Its practical uses are extensive. The organizers of this new society are concerned ...

    Polish
    II B 3, I M, I K, III E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 10, 1893
    Labors Dangers (Editorial)

    Labor, under present conditions, is a source of constant danger to the workers. The special exertion to which certain parts of the body are subjected, is the source of Many diseases that afflict the worker--the initial source of his weakening and degeneration. Many books have been written by learned physicians on the dangers to which the health of a worker is exposed by poor labor conditions.

    Undoubtedly, the greatest danger is the fatal effect of various kinds of shop dust on the lungs and other organs of the body. In Places where metal, glass, shell, and horn products are manufactured, minute particles of these materials form a dust that settles in the lungs and pores and kills the worker slowly.

    2

    A famous French physician has made a very careful study over the past few years of the effects of dust on the health of workers. He has reached the following conclusions, based on a detailed examination of a great number of individual cases: For every hundred metal workers, 54 die of consumption; in minerals, 51; compositors, 27. Among glass is workers, 27 out of 500 die of consumption. The highest mortality rate is among cabinetmakers--56 out of one hundred.

    The above are authoritative statistics. It is unnecessary to add that such occupations as, for instance, sorting of old rugs, work in factories which manufacture fertilizers and other chemical products, work that brings one in contact with phosphorus, mercury, and similar substances, are all dangerous to health. We need not mention damp, unsanitary, poorly ventilated places in which many people work.

    A laborer, then, is beset with a great variety of dangers and no safeguards.

    3

    Measures for safeguarding the lives and health of workers have long been demanded. Methods and apparatuses have been even developed to this end, as for example, ventilators to remove the dust from the air in shops and factories. Thus far these demands have brought but meager results. These fatal working conditions exist not only in the factories of Europe, but in those of America as well. Aside from ventilation, practically nothing has been done to protect the lives and health of the workers.

    This is the greatest fault of the capitalists. The sight of their egoism in the face of the workers' sufferings gives rise only to constantly embittered relations between capital and labor--relations which may lead to the worst consequences.

    Labor, under present conditions, is a source of constant danger to the workers. The special exertion to which certain parts of the body are subjected, is the source of Many ...

    Polish
    I M, I D 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 28, 1893
    Poles Are Smallpox Victims

    Yesterday afternoon, in the district south of 31st Street and east of the south branch of the river, at 883 James Avenue, a veritable nest of smallpox was discovered. Eight persons, including six from one family, were sent to the hospital and the ninth victim was discovered a block away, at 3244 Musspratt Street.

    The names of the victims are Catherine, Emma, Joseph, Sophia, John and Anna Dropski, Alfred and Ernest Chambers, and Lizzie Ordeska. These are all children under 13 years of age. Dr. Spaulding, of the Board of Health, discovered them about four o'clock in the afternoon; the doctor who originally thought it was some other kind of rash.

    The homes were immediately fumigated. Six doctors were rushed to the neighborhood to vaccinate all residents.

    Yesterday afternoon, in the district south of 31st Street and east of the south branch of the river, at 883 James Avenue, a veritable nest of smallpox was discovered. Eight ...

    Polish
    I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 30, 1893
    Danger of an Epidemic

    Smallpox has appeared among the people living in the vicinity of the Isolation Hospital for the Poor, and there is fear that it may spread further. This hospital was built more than fifteen years ago, when the neighborhood was sparsely settled, but now hundreds of families, most of which are Polish, reside here. Since these families have built their homes here after a lot of hard work, it now becomes necessary to remove this hospital to a more suitable place. In the last few days, three persons died and over sixty, of whom thirty live in this locality, contracted smallpox.

    Smallpox has appeared among the people living in the vicinity of the Isolation Hospital for the Poor, and there is fear that it may spread further. This hospital was built ...

    Polish
    I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 22, 1895
    Dr. Kaczorowski Appolnted Inspector of Health of South Chicago

    Dr. [?] Kaczorowski has been appointed Health Inspector of South Chicago by the Mayor of Chicago.

    Free small-pox vaccination will be given daily between 8 A. M. and 9 A. M., between 7 P. M. and 9 P. M., at Dr. Kaczorowski's residence, 8361 Superior Avenue, corner 84th Street.

    From 10 A. M. to 12 noon, and from 5 P. M. to 7 P. M., vaccinations will be given at the Polish Medical Center, 8816 Commercial Avenue.

    All Polish residents of the South Chicago area ought to take advantage of this free medical service. By being vaccinated against smallpox one not only protects himself but his family from unforeseen dangers.

    Dr. [?] Kaczorowski has been appointed Health Inspector of South Chicago by the Mayor of Chicago. Free small-pox vaccination will be given daily between 8 A. M. and 9 A. ...

    Polish
    II A 1, II D 3, I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 15, 1895
    Polish Doctor Given City Post

    Dr. Garrot, chief medical inspector of Chicago, has assigned Dr. C. Czerniewski, 699 Noble Street, to his staff. Dr. Czorniewski will give free inoculations against small-pox daily from 7 P. M. to 9 P. M., and from 2 P. M. to 5 P. M. on Sundays.

    All Poles should take advantage of this free medical service.

    Dr. Garrot, chief medical inspector of Chicago, has assigned Dr. C. Czerniewski, 699 Noble Street, to his staff. Dr. Czorniewski will give free inoculations against small-pox daily from 7 P. ...

    Polish
    II A 1, I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 03, 1895
    Smallpox Prevalent in Polish Communities

    Dr. E. Garrot, chief inspector of the Board of Health, paid a visit to the offices of the Dziennik Chicagoski and informed our staff about the sad health conditions in our communities.

    In the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish and adjoining communities, smallpox has been prevalent for some time, especially among the Poles, and it is spreading. During the past few weeks over sixty cases of smallpox were reported in this region; a few cases of black smallpox were also listed.

    Cases arose in the following homes: 608 and 611 Holt Avenue, 468, 469, and 470 Elston Avenue, 704 and 748 Noble Street (4 cases), 28 Luke Street, 781 Milwaukee Avenue, 6 and 10 Sloan Street, and 134 North Avenue (8 cases). This, however, is only a partial list.

    The smallpox epidemic is spreading because a large number of the families and 2even some of the doctors are keeping the sickness a secret; consequently their reports come late to the Board of Health. As a result, the stricken person cannot be removed to a hospital nor the home disinfected, which would check the spread of the disease to a minimum. As a result of this condition the spread of the disease has given cause for alarm.

    Because of this, Dr. Garrot warns all Poles to take precautions, and he appeals to them in their own interest to report all cases of smallpox, and not to keep them secret. All those who have not been vaccinated, or who were vaccinated a long time ago, are requested to see to it that they are vaccinated immediately.

    Vaccination services are rendered free by Dr. Edward Czerniewski, 699 Noble Street (corner of Noble and Blackhawk streets, above Burda's drugstore).

    All doctors who withhold any information about new smallpox cases will be prosecuted by law. Dr. Garrot has revealed their names to us; however, we will not reveal them, hoping that the doctors in question will remedy their policies in the near future.

    Dr. E. Garrot, chief inspector of the Board of Health, paid a visit to the offices of the Dziennik Chicagoski and informed our staff about the sad health conditions in ...

    Polish
    I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 06, 1895
    Smallpox Hits Polish Community

    Dr. Garrot, Commissioner of Health of Chicago, whose concern about the health of Chicagoans is well known to everyone, requests us to inform the Polish public that an outbreak of smallpox has been discovered in St. Hedwig Parish. It is especially serious on North Armitage and West Ashland Avenues. Dr. Garrot wishes to impress upon the people's minds that they should take precautionary measures in order to avert a spread of the disease. After all, this concerns their health and well-being.

    The Board of Health, with the aid of the police, during the past two months has uncovered Many cases of smallpox. Some of these cases were discovered only after the death of the victim. In other cases the victim had been ill with smallpox for over two or three weeks before it was known. Such incidents only spread the disease and make it impossible to check the epidemic. Conditions would not have become so bad had the doctors reported such cases immediately after their first visit. Had they done so, patients could have 2been removed to a Catholic hospital, and their homes could have been disinfected while they were away. In this way their neighbors could have been safeguarded and at the same time the spread of the disease could have been checked. Also many persons could have been spared the experience of infection and perhaps even danger to their lives.

    That is why Dr. Garrot is making a sincere appeal to all persons residing in St. Hedwig Parish not to keep secret any new outbreaks of smallpox, for by doing so they endanger themselves and all others who come in contact with them. All Polish doctors are also requested to report any and all cases coming to their attention.

    Only in the hospital for Contagious Diseases can smalipox be properly treated, and by such confinement the family of the patient can be safeguarded.

    This hospital is located at 26th street and California Avenue. It is under 3the supervision of Catholic nuns. The patients are given the best of care. Mothers can also be confined with their children, for there is enough room. At the present time, thanks to the Lord, there are only a few cases.

    We are familiar with a number of Poles whose children have been treated and cured at this hospital. Therefore, there is no need to avoid hospitalization at this Catholic institution.

    Dr. Garrot states that the best medium through which to gain immunity from smallpox is vaccination. Therefore those who wish to protect themselves against this disease should be vaccinated. There is no charge for this service. Through the efforts of the Board of Health the local doctors have been inoculating persons during the past week and this week at Hager's hall, 1163 North Leavitt Street. This service is between the hours of 10 A. M. and 11 A. M. One and all are entitled to this service.

    4

    Dr. Carrot invites all Polish mothers to have their children inoculated. Last year a similar epidemic was barely averted in St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish. At that time vaccinations were administered at the Polish Hall and later at the offices of Dr. Edward Czerniewski. The Poles of that vicinity headed the pleas of Dr. Garrot, who appealed to them through Dziennik Chicagoski. Thus the epidemic was averted.

    We express hope that the Poles in St. Hedwig Parish will take similar steps, for Dr. Carrot's only aim is to protect the health of the people.

    To further substantiate the claims and value of the smallpox hospital service, we are publishing a letter received from Simon Piasecki, a reputable resident of St. Hedwig Parish. It reads as follows:

    "Aug. 3, 1895.

    "The undersigned, Simon Piasecki, extends sincere thanks to Commissioner 5of Health Dr. Carrot for the gracious care he has given my family and for his sending my wife and children to the smallpox hospital.

    "Three of my children were afflicted with this disease. I sorrowfully admit that at the beginning I had little confidence in the healing value of this hospital and that at first I tried to prevent the confinement of my children there. But now I am fully convinced of its value, and I wish to announce publicly that the care given children in this hospital is not only the best but that it protects the health of the children and the adults in the home of the patient. Had I known the meticulous care tendered the patients at this institution I never would have objected to it, but instead would have immediately reported the case to the health authorities and had the children sent to the hospital.

    "At the present time I wish to urge all persons who have one of their immediate family of friends suffering from smallpox to have them sent to the smallpox hospital at once. In this way their lives as well as the lives 6of others will be protected.

    Simon Piasecki,

    1181 North Leavitt Street"

    The readers and skeptics are requested to take note of this letter. Those who do not wish to place their trust in the words of Dr. Carrot must heed the words of Mr. Piasecki. If they wish to talk with him personally they may do so and be thoroughly convinced.

    Dr. Garrot, Commissioner of Health of Chicago, whose concern about the health of Chicagoans is well known to everyone, requests us to inform the Polish public that an outbreak of ...

    Polish
    I M, II D 3, III C