The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Zgoda -- April 16, 1890
    Blessing of the Banner

    Please place this correspondence news in your Zgoda. The members of the St. Stephen Society, at the parish of St. Stanislaus, celebrated the commemoration of a beautiful Polish banner, Easter Sunday, at the expense of $600.

    The Society of St. Stephan has been organized over a year ago,and the number of members is increasing nicely. Today we have 290 members. Many of the other societies of this parish took part in this great celebration.

    At 9 o'clock, Easter morning, the procession started; the Society of St. Stanislaus came first because it is the oldest society of this parish, second came the Society of St. Casimir; third, the Society of St. Adelbert; fourth, the Society of St. Valentine; fifth, the Society of St. John Kantego; sixth, the Society of St. Stephan.

    These different societies paraded through the streets to the music 2supplied by the Society of St. Stanislaus, and returned to the church where a church mass was given, followed by a mass meeting in the church auditorium, where speeches by the Rev. Fathers and prominent leaders of Polish enterprises, were heard. The choir of St. Stanislaus sang songs, accompanied by a Polish orchestra. After the speeches, the societies marched through the streets with this new banner at the head of the parade, and many thousands of Polish people took part in the great ceremonies.

    The reverend Fathers and the committee in charge of this celebration take this opportunity to thank one and all for their splendid cooperation.

    St. Sierszulski, Sec. of St. Stephan Society.

    Please place this correspondence news in your Zgoda. The members of the St. Stephen Society, at the parish of St. Stanislaus, celebrated the commemoration of a beautiful Polish banner, Easter ...

    Polish
    III C, I B 4, III B 3 b, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 24, 1890
    "Postnik" or Polish Christmas Eve Supper.

    Throughout Poland the day preceding Christmas was always observed as a Fast Day, even by the children.

    That Fast Day was observed very respectfully not only as a church regulation but because it was also an old Polish custom, a kind of a national holiday, very solemn because it ended with a special Christmas Eve supper called "Postnik."

    A Polish Christmas Eve supper was a great family religious feast at which no meat was served.

    As soon as the sun sets and the stars begin to appear on the dome of heaven, the entire family, dressed in their best attire, gather at 2the best room called "Swietlica," and in respectful silece awaits the head of the house.

    When everything is ready the mistress of the house, usually the mother of the family, invites him and the father of the family enters, representing so well at that particular moment patriarchial times.

    He begins solemnly with prescribed prayers. Before the members of the family take their respective seats at the table laden with food, which was given by God and earned honestly by hard labor, the mistress of the house, the mother of the family, passes the wafers and the head of the house participates in that Old Polish custom, the breaking of the wafers.

    3

    He begins with the one without whose fidelity no home could exist, his spouse, and then breaks the wafers with the children and other members of the family.

    At that particular time the members of the family ask each other for forgiveness for any wrongs committed by them and promise one another as before an altar, mutual respect, patience and pure love, which proceeds from its very source, the heart of the Divine Infant lying in the cradle at the stable.

    During these apologies, forgiving and well-wishing older members of the family kiss one another as if they were brothers and sisters, real children of God.

    4

    The children kis the hands of their parents and he parents moved and thrilled by the great emotion embrace them, tenderly recalling the story fo Jesus lying in the cradle; "Theirs is the kingdom of God."

    Now, before we sit at the table, let us look around "Swietlica," or the best room in the house, thoroughly cleaned today and specially decorated for this occasion The floor is covered with fresh, clean straw to remind the little ones playing around that the Infant Jesus was born in the stable. Even on the table and under the table cover there is fresh hay spreading its sweet aroma and giving to this special supper a peculiar impression. This is one of the details which makes the Polish Christmas supper a solemn emotional event.

    Everything that is here resembles Bethlehem. Before the supper is over the children will start to sing Christmas carols nd in a short time the boys impersonating shepherds will enter and perform a Christmas play.

    5

    The night is changed into day and it would last until dawn had it not been for the sound of the bell from the high church tower, which calls them to the church. There they sing Christmas songs filling the hearts of the faithful not only with historical recollections but also with sacramental reality, holy fire and heavenly light. They will begin the old Polish Christmas song, "In the cradle lies Little Jesus," recalling sweet emotions originated at the supper table and brought to the altar. When the words; "And the Word became Flesh and dwelled among us," are sounded, all the faithful fall on their knees and at the same moment the human sounds of Christian carols are joined with the angelic praises sung to the glory of the Incarnate Majesty.

    This is how Poles of the olden times started the observation of the Christmas Holy Day.

    6

    Between the Fast Dya and the Christmas Day there was a Christmas supper. ndeed the Polish "Postnik" has a very deep significance; its feast is a real "Agape" or a feast of early Christians.

    Verily, sincerity, simplicity and benevolence not caused by personal interests, and a humbleness equal among grown ups and children, and poor and rich, expresses the thought in which this feast was originated, also recalling the modesty and devotion peculiar to the time of the martyrs.

    Will not older persons looking at the children playing together on the straw and sharing their oys recall the time when they played at the feet of their parents?

    7

    Verily, the deep significance of Christian feasts and Holy Days cannot be explained by heartless philosophizing.

    Only after God became Man, man realized what he is, what he should be and what he might be.

    He should be a Man, a God, a Son of the Highest, an idealized being. And heaven and earth are saying, Amen.

    Throughout Poland the day preceding Christmas was always observed as a Fast Day, even by the children. That Fast Day was observed very respectfully not only as a church regulation ...

    Polish
    I B 4, III B 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 24, 1890
    A New Guest at Christmas Eve Supper (Editorial)

    This year, at the Christmas Eve supper, when Polish families, especially in Chicago, will be gathered at their tables for the traditional custom of breaking and partaking of the wafer, a new guest will be present. This young guest that loves all Poles sincerely, and brings best wishes into the homes, is Dziennik Chicagoski.

    "Glory be to God in the Highest and Peace to All People of Good Will."

    This new guest, dear readers, desires to bring, peace, good will, harmony, 2and mutual love into your homes. This new guest desires to be your meditator, welcomed everywhere and by everybody. It desires to remove disagreements and bring understanding among you, to give you an opportunity to know yourselves better. It desires to enlighten you on important matters, to reconcile you, and to establish brotherly love among you.

    We know positively that you will not refuse this guest, that you will welcome it on that day; we have proofs of it in spite of the short existence of our journal.

    Please accept our best wishes. May God bless all your endeavors, lighten your burdens, alleviate your sufferings, and prolong your happiness.

    3

    We also hope that you live to be a hundred years old, own your homes and reap a harvest of gold.

    Tomorrow is Christmas Day, one of the most important holy days of the year. We will observe it. All will have a holiday tomorrow, the whole world has a holiday; therefore, no one will accuse us of wrong doing if we desire to observe solemnly such a holiday. In order to supply our subscribers with something to read, in case they have any time left for that purpose, we are mailing "Wiara I Ojczyzna" (Faith and Motherland) early enough so that they receive it on that day.

    We remarked in the editorial columns of our journal, a few days ago that other 4newspapers ignored us but since that time favorable comments have appeared in several newspapers, therefore, we thank our colleagues very kindly and wish them a Merry Christmas.

    This year, at the Christmas Eve supper, when Polish families, especially in Chicago, will be gathered at their tables for the traditional custom of breaking and partaking of the wafer, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, III B 3 b, II A 2, I B 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 06, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    Last night there was a Polish Christmas festivity at the Polish orphanage, Division Street and Holt Avenue, for the benefit of the Polish orphans. Those who came to see the interior of this institution (a credit to the Polish community in Chicago), and to hear the beautiful Christmas carols sung by the little orphans, and give them a Christmas present, gathered at 7 P. M.

    At the chapel of the orphanage, located on the top floor, a scene representing the stable of Bethlehem was presented. There was a manger artistically decorated. The roof of the miniature replica of the stable was covered with straw. Inside the stable there were images of the Holy Mary, St. Joseph, the Three Kings on their knees offering gifts to the Lord of Lords, and figures representing an ox, an ass, a sheep, a lamb, a pair of doves, and a dog. The floor of the miniature replica of the stable was covered with straw and hay. The manger was located at the farthest end of the replica, on the back wall of which images of angels singing glories to the Lord were seen. Over the stable shone the Star of Bethlehem that led the Kings to the holy place.

    2

    We doubt there was anywhere in this country so beautiful a presentation of the holy manger as this. Every person who attended the festivity admired this artistically arranged scenery and, after looking at it for a short time, knelt down with great reverence, as the Three Kings did when they paid homage to the divine Infant centuries ago.

    Led by the nuns, the orphans entered the place at eight o'clock. The organ began to play, and Christmas carols were started. The visitors heard the beautiful and clear melodies of the children. The audience consisted of mothers with their children, women, and a number of prominent citizens and leaders of societies. A short sermon followed the carols, after which there was a recitation of a poem by a boy, who did it with great emotion.

    When the divine service was over, the pastor took the guests downstairs and showed them the halls used by the orphans. The visitors were pleased with the good order and cleanliness that resigned everywhere. The arrangements and conveniences in some of the halls are very interesting. The furniture is very simple. Yet, this simplicity and cleanliness give them an appearance of comfort and elegance.

    3

    The study and recreation hall was furnished with chairs and tables, around which sat the children, contented and with smiling faces, standing up when the guests entered. The bedrooms were clean, furnished with simple small beds covered with bedspreads white as snow, bath room, wash room, dining room, and a spacious wardrobe, systematically arranged and well filled with linen. The guests were so pleased with these things that every little while they expressed their admiration in loud exclamations, in spite of the fact that nothing luxurious could be detected.

    Every person visiting the institution left it with the impression that the little orphans are well taken care of under the protection of the nuns, and that this institution is a credit to its founders, deserving therefore the support of those who can help. Later on we will describe how the orphans, and there are 80 of them, are brought up and educated.

    Last night there was a Polish Christmas festivity at the Polish orphanage, Division Street and Holt Avenue, for the benefit of the Polish orphans. Those who came to see the ...

    Polish
    II D 4, III B 3 b, I B 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 05, 1892
    Holy Family Orphanage

    The holiday of the Three Kings will be celebrated in the home of the Holy Orphanage on Division Street. Puppets representing the birth of Christ will be altered to conform to the commemoration of this day: The shepherds are returning to their homes and the three kings are coming to offer gifts and homage to the Child Jesus Christ.

    Mr. Carl A. Buscher, who has prepared and assembled the miniature replica of the birth of Christ will make the necessary changes. He will work on it today, putting into his work the same artistry he put on the original.

    Children will not be admitted free of charge unless they are accompanied by their parents. Those boys that desire to come alone will be charged ten cents for admission. Two ushers will be stationed at the door to look after these boys and to see that they do not get into mischief.

    2

    The following contributions were received after the monthly report was made: M. Gniot, 658 Dickenson Street, sent a bundle of muslin; Miss Josephine Pyterek gave a number of remnants and two dollars.

    The total donation of other individuals amounted to $25.

    Sincere thanks are offered for these kind and timely gifts.

    Maria Rosamunda, S. S. d. N. D.

    The holiday of the Three Kings will be celebrated in the home of the Holy Orphanage on Division Street. Puppets representing the birth of Christ will be altered to conform ...

    Polish
    II D 4, III B 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 11, 1892
    News from Holy Family Orphanage

    The religious holiday of the Three Kings will come to an end with next Wednesday's evening services, which will be held at 7:30 P. M. Everyone is welcome to attend, especially those who never paid a visit to this place before. The men who work during the day and find leisure time during the evening, will get a few restful and joyous moments in the services. Children may come if accompanied by an adult.

    The Holy Family Orphanage Choir will sing religious numbers of the Christmas holidays. By the execution of these numbers, the visitors will be able to form an idea of the progress of the children in the orphanage. The visitors will be invited to see the living quarters of the children. The furnishings are attractive and simple, although not paid for in full as yet. The condition that obtains in the institution was made public before the holidays, with the result that generous contributions were received and most of the 2improvements were paid for. Although donations should supply most of the needs, the fact is that the demand exceeds the supply. Since a majority of the improvements depend on voluntary offering, we urge those that can afford it to give their share. It is hoped that this request will bring many kind responses.

    Material, odds and ends, etc., will be gladly received. Since in this kind of work the beginning is always hard, we anticipated these hardships. Our purchases were a bit high in price, nevertheless, everything was essential. The Christmas spirit has helped a great deal and the children have done their part to make this work a reality. They have prayed fervently, they have sung with devotion, and they have worked diligently. Their efforts were rewarded; toys and candy were shared by all.

    At present there are 123 children in the Home, and their daily routine is as follows: 5:45 A. M. Getting out of bed, washing, and dressing.

    3

    6:15 A. M. Morning prayers.

    6:30 A. M. Holy Mass.

    7:15 A. M. Breakfast and recreation.

    8:30 - - School hours-at mid point half hour recess is taken

    11:30 A. M. for recreation and second breakfast.

    12 noon. Luncheon

    1-4 P. M. School hours.

    4:30 P. M. Repast. The older children do their homework and the younger say the Rosary.

    6:15 P. M. Dinner.

    After the evening meal, there is a recess for recreation until the evening prayers. At 8 P. M. there is another rest period. The older children practice the singing in which they have been instructed during the day. The young children prepare themselves for bed at 7 P. M. This group sleeps longer in the morning.

    4

    Dr. E. Czarniewski examines the children daily and if necessary twice a day.

    There is one gentleman in particular to whom the Orphanage owes unlimited appreciation. He supplies daily all the bread that is needed for the Home. Thanks have been given him before, and we repeat them now with greater gratitude.

    The following contributions have been sent in since we made our last report: Michael and Joseph Wituski, 157 W. Blackhawk Street, donated a beautiful writing desk; an anonymous person sent five dollars in gold; Mr. Schultz, $5; Miss Augustine Lamkowski, $2; Mr. Joseph Schwichtenberg, $2.

    The organization is very grateful for these kind contributions.

    It is hoped that many persons will turn out for the services of the holiday of Three Kings.

    Maria Rosamunda

    S. S. J. N. D.

    The religious holiday of the Three Kings will come to an end with next Wednesday's evening services, which will be held at 7:30 P. M. Everyone is welcome to attend, ...

    Polish
    III C, III B 3 b, II D 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 11, 1892
    Polish Patriotic Organization Holds Meeting

    The Polish Patriotic Organization held a meeting on Apr. 5. Among those present were: Fathers F. Gordon and Kasprzycki, I. Machnikowski, S. Zahajkiewicz, and B. Klarkowski.

    The main event of the meeting was the agreement upon the method of celebration of the 101st anniversary of the third of May, which is as follows:

    The celebration will be twofold: religious and civil.

    On May 3, the religious ceremonies will be performed in the morning at St. Stanislaus' church. A mass will be given in memory of the souls of the creators and supporters of the Constitution of the 3rd of May. An evening service will mark the end of the celebration. Father Gordon will give a patriotic sermon.

    2

    All the orders of the Knights and all true patriots are invited to attend both services.

    The civil celebration will be held Sunday, May 8. This day will also mark the birth of St. Stanislaus B.M., patron of the Kingdom of Poland. A special program will be given at St. Stanislaus Kostki's school hall at 7:30 P.M.

    Program

    1. Father F. Gordon will open the celebration and call upon the chairman.

    2. A song of prayer by the parish choir.

    3. A historical speech by S. Zahajkiewicz.

    4. Declamation by Mr. Jozwiakowski.

    3

    5. Speech by Reverend Vincent Barzynski.

    6. Sketch based on a Polish historical theme.

    7. Conclusion: patriotic song 'Boze Cos Polske'.

    The program was adopted at yesterday's meeting.

    The Polish Patriotic Organization held a meeting on Apr. 5. Among those present were: Fathers F. Gordon and Kasprzycki, I. Machnikowski, S. Zahajkiewicz, and B. Klarkowski. The main event of ...

    Polish
    III C, III B 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 11, 1892
    Observation of Palm Sunday at St. Mary's of Perpetual Help Church (Letter)

    Palm Sunday was observed yesterday amidst solemn rites as the palms were blessed and passed out to those that attended the services at St. Mary's of Perpetual Help Church.

    Unusual impressive Gregorian hymns were sung by the church choir during the blessing of the palms and the procession. Reverend Father S. Nawrocki, pastor, officiated during the solemn high mass. The Passion was sung by three assisting priests, garbed in attire fitting the ceremonial. Father C. Domogalski sang the part of the Evangelist, Father F. Wojtalewicz sang the role of Jesus Christ, and Father Byrger took the part of the Jewish priests and people.

    2

    Those who have witnessed the blessing of the palms for the first time were greatly impressed by the solemn rites and the Gregorian singing. This Palm Sunday ritual recalled to many with joy and sadness the Cathedrals of Posen, Gniezno, and Pelpliny.

    Palm Sunday was observed yesterday amidst solemn rites as the palms were blessed and passed out to those that attended the services at St. Mary's of Perpetual Help Church. Unusual ...

    Polish
    III B 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 27, 1893
    Polish Patriotic Organization Decides to Pay All Costs of Protest to Washington

    The Polish Patriotic Organization's meeting that took place yesterday at four o'clock is worthy of notice.

    We can omit such details as committee reports, financial reports, etc., and come immediately to those matters which we feel are of real importance. The Organization made a very noble gesture, which is deserving of the highest recognition. It has decided to pay all the expenses that have arisen and will yet arise from the Polish protest against the American extradition treaty with Russia.

    Further, the holiday of the Polish Queen's Crown falls on April 1. In order to honor its patron saint, the Organization is preparing a huge celebration for April 8 (delayed because of the Easter holidays).

    2

    In addition, we find it necessary to mention the program that followed yesterday's meeting, which consisted of a lecture; music, and declamations. A very interesting and exhaustive lecture on the life and works of John Kochanowski was delivered by Mr. Klarkowski. Mr. A. Kwasigroch rendered a beautiful vocal number, and Messrs. John Kikulski and Jozwiakowski declaimed with inspiration. All contributors to the program were applauded generously.

    The Polish Patriotic Organization's meeting that took place yesterday at four o'clock is worthy of notice. We can omit such details as committee reports, financial reports, etc., and come immediately ...

    Polish
    III H, III B 3 b, II B 2 g, III B 1, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 18, 1893
    Holiday in St. Hedwig's Parish

    It is evident that not only does the spirit of patriotism live within our people, but that enthusiasm for the Catholic faith has not waned. Proof of this lies in yesterday's celebration of the patron saints day in St. Hedwig's Parish. In spite of it being a weekday, the church was unexpectedly crowded both in the morning and evening; the piousness and reverence expressed in most of the faces was inspiring. It can easily be seen that the priest of that parish watch zealously over the souls entrusted to their care.

    The celebration was a beautiful one. Mass was said by the Reverend S. Kobrzynski, assisted by Fathers B. Pawlowski, and Malkowski, as deacon and subdeacon respectively (both of St. Adalbert's Parish).

    The Reverend A. Nowilki of South Chicago delivered a very beautiful sermon. He spoke of the virtues by which each saint distinguished himself, and of St. Hedwig's special virtues.

    2

    A procession and the consecration of the Holy Sacrament were held in the evening. The Reverend F. Matuszewski delivered the sermon. His subject was how we are to follow the examples set by our forefathers, especially our saints.

    Music by the parish choir and the participation of the girls' societies and colorfully uniformed military societies helped to make the day a success.

    In addition to the afore-mentioned priest, the Reverends F. Lange, of St. Josephat's; S. Radziejewski, of Poznan; Kozlowski, Nawrocki, L. Magozicki, V. Barzynski, and J. Gieburowski, were also present.

    It is evident that not only does the spirit of patriotism live within our people, but that enthusiasm for the Catholic faith has not waned. Proof of this lies in ...

    Polish
    III B 3 b, III C, IV