The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 09, 1891
    Saint Stanislaus Kostka's Polish Hall Opened to the Public

    The opening of the St. Stanislaus parish hall took place last night. This hall, which is very large, is located at the new school building.

    The opening was celebrated with the presentation of an amateur play sponsored by the parish choir with the cooperation of the Knights of the Crown of the Polish Queen.

    The beautiful hall was filled to capacity. Its beauty, of which the Poles should be proud, did not pass unnoticed, and many people from the audience admired its beautiful chandeliers, the curtains, and the decorations. The Poles never before had such a beautiful hall. Its design, its large windows, its magnificent ceiling make the hall beautiful. In addition to its beauty, it has a good heating system and good ventilation. Another feature of importance is the two main stairways and four side-exits for the convenience of the public. The stage is so large that battles could be fought on it. Indeed, this is some thing to see and to admire.

    2

    The play selected for the opening of the hall was "The Polish Insurrection of 1863," a drama which pleased the public immensely. And why not? The actors played the roles of ardent patriots face to face with the hated foes. There were victorious encounters, and loathsome scenes of Russian abuses contrasted with the Poles' lofty examples of true patriotism, true love of their country and self-sacrifice.

    The author of the play did not present the sad end of the insurrection because he feared that it might arouse hatreds. His purpose was to amuse the audience with scenes representing victorious encounters of the Polish patriots with the Russians, and at the same time he desired to convince the audience that the insurrection was justified because it was forced by Russian outrages. The author put great emphasis on the bravery of the insurrectors, who indeed performed heroic deeds wherever they could.

    Our amateurs were so deeply affected by their roles that one could perceive that they felt their actions and thoughts. Deserving special attention was the role of a patriotic Polish mother in whose bosom raged a battle between 3motherhood and patriotism. The mother role was played with deep emotion by Mrs. Pauline Kiolbassa, and the roles of the two daughters by Miss Lessner and Miss Zukowski. All the amateurs were emotionally affected by their roles and played splendidly.

    The insurrectionists were presented as great patriots and the Muscovites not only improve the acting but also make possible the acquisition of better costumes.

    We have noticed that sometimes the actors are handicapped by the behavior of the public, who make so much noise that the actors are forced to speak too loud if they expect to be heard, especially in a hall as large as St. Stanislaus's. Actors are also interrupted by outbursts of laughter at the wrong time. This is done by the young folks who think they know everything and like to criticize. Amateurs should send complimentary tickets to all Polish newspapers and see to it that their critics be provided with good seats.

    The opening of the St. Stanislaus parish hall took place last night. This hall, which is very large, is located at the new school building. The opening was celebrated with ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, III B 2, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 24, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    With a view to increasing the field of activity of its Educational Department, the Polish Patriotic Organization will hold a meeting on Feb. 25, 7:30 P.M., at Saint Stanislaus's school hall.

    All clergy, officers of church societies, teachers, organists, editors of newspapers and choir singers, as well as all citizens interested in the Polish Educational Department,are invited.

    With a view to increasing the field of activity of its Educational Department, the Polish Patriotic Organization will hold a meeting on Feb. 25, 7:30 P.M., at Saint Stanislaus's school ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 f
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 27, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    St. Casmir Young Men's Society, in St. Stanislaus Parish, donated $50 to the parish library fund. This fund will be used for enlarging the parish library, especially the establishment of a reading room. The library is in charge of the Polish Patriots' Club, and this fund is at its disposal. The young men of this society certainly deserve due credit and hearty support in every respect. They are a good example to our Polish youth, and we hope they will be Polish patriots, even though some of them are born in America and will remain here.

    St. Casmir Young Men's Society, in St. Stanislaus Parish, donated $50 to the parish library fund. This fund will be used for enlarging the parish library, especially the establishment of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III B 2, III C, III E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 05, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago Polish Patriotic Organization Holds Important Meeting

    The Educational Department of the Polish Patriotic Organization of St. Stanislaus Parish held a meeting at St. Stanislaus Hall last night.

    At this meeting the aims of this society were discussed. The principal aim is to spread a general campaign of education in the form of Polish patriotic literature, Polish music, both church and national, among the Polish people. It is also proposed to develop the artistic talents of our people, that they may become able representatives of dramatic art, especially national. Generally speaking, the purpose of the organization is to educate the Polish youth.

    We know that the beginning is very hard, for it is the custom of the Poles only to look at one another everytime anything not immediately practical is proposed.

    One of our difficulties in America is that many of us who lack the necessary qualifications for a given job refuse to improve ourselves by hard study.

    2

    We have no courage to acknowledge it, and even refuse to believe that this deficiency can be overcome.

    The Educational Department desires to do away with this deficiency by conducting special conferences in which the youth may get together and discuss different subjects.

    If the members of the Department will work steadily, efficiently, and systematically, there can be no doubt that the result of their labors will be evident in a short time. Not the one who only plans, but the one who plans and executes accurately is the one to conquer difficulties large and small. Cooperative work always brings its fruit.

    Let us act, brother patriots! Mutual confidence, understanding, orderly meetings and patient performance of our obligations will make us benefactors of the Polish youth.

    Your deeds will be written in gold letters in the book, of life and in the hearts of those for whom you will open treasures of knowledge, treasures 3of beauty; for whom you will open temples of universal and national wisdom.

    Those who doubt should retreat; let them be silent; they should not discourage others.

    The one who discourages others takes a great responsibility upon himself before God and country.

    There are people who criticize everything no matter how good it is, and who are glad if they succeed in spoiling the work of others.

    Such satisfaction is disastrous and will be punished by God, let alone that quite often the people discover such foxes.

    The harder the beginning the more courage, understanding and cooperation we need. Constructive criticism is useful too if given at the right time.

    The Educational Department of the Polish Patriotic Organization of St. Stanislaus Parish held a meeting at St. Stanislaus Hall last night. At this meeting the aims of this society were ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 2 g, I A 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 12, 1891
    Zgoda

    Zgoda, which is edited by a person who is endeavoring very zealously to discredit the Polish National Alliance, states in its last issue that the entire program arranged by the Polish Roman-Catholic Union to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Polish Constitution of the Third of May, and announced by Dziennik Chicagoski, is made for the purpose of misleading the public. We suspected for some time, but now are almost positive, that the editor of Zgoda is either incapable or does not care to support, spread, and explain the ideals of the Polish National Alliance and other national organizations. It seems to us that he is only concerned with his own ridiculous ideas. Even though the title of his paper calls for harmony, it is not strange at all that he be preaching the opposite, causing dissension among 2the Poles.

    "Why didn't we arrange for this festivity earlier?" asks the editor of Zgoda. Yes, we tried to arrange it last year, but the deliberation broke up, not through the fault of the organizations affiliated with the Polish Roman-Catholic Union, that waited for an answer and further deliberation, but through the fault of the delegates sent by national organizations not connected with the Polish Roman-Catholic Union, and who gave no answer, and through the fault of the editor of Zgoda, who obstructed our plans by articles which could have been stopped by the Polish National Alliance.

    3

    The editor of Zgoda implies that it would be impossible to eliminate organizations of nihilistic and unpatriotic tendencies, or those which are soiled with anarchism or czarism, for the simple reason that not everybody could clear himself of such charge if it were made for the purpose of elimination. Yes, then it is true that the independent organizations, and those which are affiliated with the Polish National Alliance, cannot prove that they are not soiled with anarchism or czarism if they were accused of it. And if they cannot prove it and cannot clear themselves of such charge, then it is the fault of the editor of Zgoda, who is degrading the organ of the Polish National Alliance by publishing in it foul articles.

    4

    Zgoda, "The assay, the chemical means that can prove all this," so has expressed himself the sarcastically happy editor of Zgoda, which should be the organ of all Polish organizations, if they have one, has been very badly polluted, but in our opinion it can still be cleansed. So much for the editor of Zgoda today.

    We are not accusing at present the Polish National Alliance or any other organization not affiliated with it or with the Polish Roman-Catholic Union, unless they confirm their sympathy with the editor of Zgoda by silence or open declaration.

    5

    We are of the opinion that the prospect for celebrating the commemoration of this historical event is very good in spite of the opposition of the editor of Zgoda.

    That some organizations will observe this commemoration very solemnly downtown on Saturday, that the church societies will observe it on Sunday, May the 3rd,and that there will be another celebration for school children on Monday, is no reason why we should not get together on some other day in order to form some kind of a constitution for the entire Polish element in America, and by this act conclude the commemoration of declaration of the Polish Constitution a hundred years ago.

    6

    Indeed, we need a special day for consultation, for understanding and for putting an end to quarrels, for it would be impossible to accomplish all this on a day devoted to other activity.

    We hope that our extended hand will be welcomed by all good and sincere patriots; that every organization will elect a number of delegates, - one to every twenty-five members, - and send their names to the secretary of the celebration organized by the Polish Roman-Catholic Union. We hope that all of us will admit that we need a general conference. We also hope that in case someone has any objection to our plan, or a better proposition, or a good suggestion for some improvement, or any question to make, he should come forward without prejudice, without bitterness in his heart, with the conviction that he is serving the national cause and with the desire to effect solidarity.

    7

    Inasmuch as Zgoda will not publish any reconciliatory articles as long as it is controlled by its present editor, we are offering the columns of our paper for such remarks, advice or propositions as may be constructive, peaceful, serious, and not opposed to the principles of patriotism and the Roman-Catholic church, and provided that such articles bear the signature of the writer or organization,which we as editors like to have for our private information.

    Zgoda, which is edited by a person who is endeavoring very zealously to discredit the Polish National Alliance, states in its last issue that the entire program arranged by the ...

    Polish
    I C, II B 2 d 1, III B 3 a, III B 2, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 13, 1891
    Banquet of Polish Singers at the Palmer House

    Polish songs were heard last night at the Palmer House, one of the finest hotels of our city, during the banquet given by the Polish Allied Singers of America. The banquet was to celebrate a contest sponsored by the Allied Singers on the best composition of a cantata to be sung at the 100th anniversary of the declaration of the Polish Constitution of the Third of May.

    Twenty compositions were submitted from many parts of America and Europe. The prize for the best composition was one hundred dollars.

    The following choir leaders, were selected as the judges of the contest: Hans Balatka, J. Frereka, N. Leduchowski, A. Seebaum, and Anthony Mallka. The judges selected the cantata "Tam Na Wschodzie Gwiazda Swieci" (In the East Shines a Star), which was composed by Mr. Titus Ernest, of Utica, N. Y.

    About one hundred persons participated in the banquet, among them prominent Poles of Chicago. The banquet was held in the hotel's banquet hall, which 2was beautifully decorated for the occasion. The Polish Singers Alliance of America, the Chopin's Quartette of Chicago, and the Harmony's Quartette of Milwaukee thrilled the guests with their songs.

    Mr. K. Mallek, president of the Polish Singers Alliance of America, delivered a short address. He was followed by Mr. E. I. Slupecki, who spoke about the Polish Singers Alliance in America. Other speakers were Mr. S. Nicki, who talked about Poland, and Mr. Michael Osuch, who gave a speech about America, our adopted country. Mr. E. Seebaum spoke in the name of the judges of the contest and Mr. E. Z. Brodowski about the Polish Constitution of the Third of May (1791).

    There were other speakers, among them Mr. Jan Smulski.

    The solo numbers were by Mr. Wojnicki and Mr. Slupecki, of Milwaukee.

    Polish songs were heard last night at the Palmer House, one of the finest hotels of our city, during the banquet given by the Polish Allied Singers of America. The ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 24, 1891
    "They Are Revealing Their Will to Us" (Editorial)

    The vice censor of the Polish National Alliance has expressed his opinion about that organization. According to him, the lodges belonging to the P. N. A. are not allowed to make any decisions without the consent, or rather without the will, of the central board of that organization.

    Is this in reality the opinion of each separate lodge? And do sensible members of the P. N. A. share that point of view? The near future will tell.

    As soon as the program of the three-day celebration commemorating the Polish Constitution of the Third of May, arranged by the Polish Roman Catholic Union was announced in Dziennik Chicagoski, a very severe criticism of our article appeared [in the next] issue of Zgoda.

    2

    Every part of the program--the three-day celebration, the memorial service for those who sacrificed their lives for the Fatherland, the plan of holding a general Polish conference--is represented in Zgoda as a farce, an act of treason, an infamy, a disgrace and a deception.

    On the other hand, neither the organ of the P. R. C. U., Wiara I Ojczyna nor Dziennik Chicagoski, supporting the three-day celebration, criticized one point of the celebration arranged by the P. N. A. for the second of May. Angered by this lack of criticism, Zgoda suspected that their celebration would be branded a "masonic rabble."

    In view of the first fact mentioned, let the sensible members of the P. N. A. (if the vice censor's statement does not hold for them) decide who behaved patriotically, who showed more fairness.

    Let us mention another fact. Some P. N. A. lodges sent their delegates to Rev. V. Barzynski last year to arrange a general celebration in honor of the 3Polish Constitution of the Third of May. A conference was held at which Father V. Barzynski's remarks provoked those delegates and later angered the lodges to such a degree that they refused to come to an understanding with the P. R. C. U. societies or to negotiate with them. Immediately Zgoda attacked Rev. V. Barzynski. Quite naturally the attack aroused the indignation of the societies which respect Father Barzynski as a patriot and exemplary priest. This of course made a reconciliation almost impossible. At that time, that is after the return of the delegates from Father V. Barzynski with their proposal, every impartial person, including some of the delegates and Father V. Barzynski himself, thought that after the presentation of the proposition to the P. N. A. lodges, an attempt would be made either to modify the stipulation or to make a counter proposal. Nothing of the kind occurred although there were violent attacks upon the priest because he dared to give his conscientious advice.

    This mutual indignation manifested itself in violent eruptions of abusive language on one side, and anger on the other. At that time these undignified 4attacks could be explained and justified by the "hot Polish temper".

    Some reflection should have taken place, at least after some time. The P. N. A. lodges should have made an attempt at reconciliation with the societies affiliated with the P. R. C. U., and these societies should have shown their willingness to reach an understanding. And they did, for they sent letters to the P. N. A. lodges in which they proposed a general conference after the second of May. Zgoda, however, prevented the P. N. A. lodges from participating in that conference; it ridiculed the program of the societies affiliated with the P. R. C. U. and insulted Father V. Barzynski as the adviser of the P. R. C. Union. It tried to provoke criticism of the celebration arranged by the P. N. A., and being unsuccessful, began to fabricate stories about that celebration. Finally, the censor of the P. N. A. announced that its lodges would comply with the decision of the central board of the P. N. A. This decision was not to participate in the conference.

    Let sensible members of the P. N. A. suggest what more could have been done 5by the societies affiliated with the P. R. C. U. They expressed their desire for an agreement. Could these societies, after what took place, after the insults heaped upon a respected counsellor, declare that they were willing, for the sake of holy peace, to give up their spiritual adviser and ask permission to participate in the P. N. A. celebration?

    Every sensible person will admit that these societies did more than was expected. Not being invited, they are not criticizing the P. N. A. celebration, and having no desire to interfere with it, they have arranged for their own to take place the following day. They are extending a friendly hand in spite of the insults of Zgoda and of malicious tongues. They are charitable although they are twice as strong. And you--that is your correspondents in Zgoda--ridicule their generous actions. You sneer at every statement, at every step taken, and you increasingly anger their spiritual counsellor by your vicious attacks. Finally your vice censor makes a proclamation stating that you can take no steps until your executive committee reveals its decision.

    6

    How ridiculous are some of the reasons invented by Zgoda for not participating in the proposed general conference. According to Zgoda this conference is a deception. How can it be a deception when you will have an equal voice in it? You presume that your celebration of May 2 will be criticized anyhow, and so you continue to criticize viciously the program of the P. R. C. U. although there is no criticism made of your own program. You state that Father V. Barzynski, and not the societies, is arranging the celebration. While this statement has never been confirmed, not even by one of the societies, you yourselves declare very clearly that you are acting on the decision of your executive committee.

    Your censor has made an ironic remark that there is no necessity of sending delegates to Chicago as though it were some kind of Mecca. Now if we are going to hold a general assembly, then there must be a suitable place for it. Is it strange that the city of Chicago which has the largest Polish population was chosen, or that the P. R. C. U., the largest Polish organization in America, is extending the invitation?

    7

    Wherever there is ill will, there is always faultfinding in everything, no matter how small; where there is good will, small mistakes are overlooked, and necessary sacrifices made for the good of the cause.

    The vice censor of the Polish National Alliance has expressed his opinion about that organization. According to him, the lodges belonging to the P. N. A. are not allowed to ...

    Polish
    III B 3 a, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, III B 4, I C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 03, 1891
    Polish Activities

    The Polish Dramatic Club presented "Night Of Humor" last night, at the new Polish Hall to a small audience. It is a pity that the attendance was so small, though a large gathering was not expected because no tickets were sold and the play was not advertised for any length of time, as is the custom before staging big plays. This was done only during the last two days. No special efforts were made because last night's activity was only a trial or a sample of performances which will be staged by the Club in the future.

    Our readers are acquainted with the aim of this club, for we described it in one of our earlier articles. We wish to point out that no one who attended last night's play, "Night of Humor," was disappointed, for every one enjoyed himself immensely, and in this respect, last night's entertainment was a great success. On account of limited space, we cannot describe all the details of last night's program, which consisted of many numbers.

    2

    We wish, however, to state that the following persons contributed to the amusement and enjoyment of the audience: Mr. Czekala, a very popular Polish comedian, entertained the audience with his song, "With the Salt," and with his comical impersonations. He also presented a Polish-English comedy entitled "Misunderstanding"; Mr. Kedziorski, the president of the Club, appeared in the comedy sketch entitled "Mr. Brochocki," in which he played the part of the justice of the peace. He also entertained the audience with songs and monologues in the English language; and Mr. Rosa, who presented "Burg Music," a one-act comedy, greatly amused the audience.

    "The Grandma Katzenjammer," a one-act comedy written by Mr. S. Zachajkiewich only last Saturday, was also presented last night, and proved to be a great success. It brought from the audience outbursts of laughter as never heard before. The following took part: Mr. Kedziorski, Mr. Czekala, Mr. Szajkowski, and Mr. Jozwiakowski, who deserve a great deal of credit and should be complimented, for they tried to outdo one another in performing their comical parts. We should also admire their improvising talent, for to do so would 3be quite appropriate.

    The most important part of the program was comprised of solos and recitations composed by Mr. J. Kedziorski and Mr. Barwig, and recited by Mr. Jozwiakowski. The numbers were interspersed with piano solos. This varied program delighted the audience immensely. We wish to point out that Messrs. Barwig and Kedziorski as singers, and Mr. Jozwiakowski as an elocutionist, have been great favorites of the public for some time. The accompaniment to the songs was played by Mr. A. Kwasigroch. The educational part of the program was a lecture on art, and a short talk by Reverend W. Barzynski, at the end.

    The Polish Dramatic Club will give similar entertainments for their own members once a week, and they intend to give them for the benefit of the public once or twice a month. The ladies did not participate in the "Night of Humor." Will they refuse to patronize the Club in the future? In our opinion, this would be unfair.

    The Polish Dramatic Club presented "Night Of Humor" last night, at the new Polish Hall to a small audience. It is a pity that the attendance was so small, though ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, III B 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- June 08, 1891
    Polish Residents Celebrate Twenty-fifth Anniversary of St. Stanislaus Society Observed

    The twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the society of St. Stanislaus was celebrated by the Polish people at St. Stanislaus Hall last evening. This was the first Polish society organized in the United States. The Polish colony in Chicago then numbered forty-five families and Peter Kiobassa brought together a group of twenty-five persons for literary and religious culture. Father Szulak, a Jesuit-priest, was chosen spiritual adviser, and he soon organized a church. The Polish population of the city is now 100,000 and St. Stanislaus Church has 20,000 communicants.

    The exercises began yesterday morning, solemn high mass being celebrated at 10 o'clock, accompanied by an orchestra of seventy-five pieces.

    2

    In the afternoon the society paraded the streets in the vicinity of the parish. An elaborate program was carried out at St. Stanislaus Hall in the evening. The hall was decorated with flowers and American and Polish flags. Jacob Towaszewski, President of the society, delivered an address of welcome which was followed by local and instrumental music under the direction of A. J. Kwasigroch. Addresses were delivered by Peter Kiolbassa and the Rev. Father Vincent Barzyuski, rector of the parish.

    The program ended with the presentation of the Polish play "Blayek Opetany," by members of the choir.

    The twenty-fifth anniversary of the founding of the society of St. Stanislaus was celebrated by the Polish people at St. Stanislaus Hall last evening. This was the first Polish society ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III G
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 19, 1891
    New Polish Building and Loan Association Organized

    The Fifteenth Ward Building and Loan Association, organized on June 8, 1891, will hold its third meeting at Mr. Joseph Kowaczek's Hall, 1025 North Hoyne Avenue on June 22 at 7:30 P. M. We wish to inform the public that our association is still in the process of organization. At present, we are not accepting any money, but new members. This will not be a small organization of ten or fifteen members. We desire to have a large gathering at which we will discuss ways and means of organizing a building and loan association, and elect qualified persons for officers of the association.

    At present, we have two temporary officials: John Lewandowski, president, and Constantine Swiatkowski, secretary. As soon as we have a thousand members the association will be legally organized. Then the members will pay their dues which will be twelve and a half cents on one share. We 2will then have a right to elect regular officials. This rule was made at the last meeting. We have applicants already for 316 shares. Brothers please do not delay, for we need such an Association at St. Hedwig's Parish.

    Let us take a look at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish. In that parish, there are many building and loan associations, and every one is in a fine condition. Our parish is so large that we could have two or three of them, yet we have none.

    Let us all gather at the above mentioned hall on Monday, June 22, and we will be convinced that it is easier to help one another than to pay a large rate of interest and nice premiums to downtown rich banks.

    In the name of the committee

    Constantine Swiatkowski, Secretary,

    1057 Dudley Street.

    The Fifteenth Ward Building and Loan Association, organized on June 8, 1891, will hold its third meeting at Mr. Joseph Kowaczek's Hall, 1025 North Hoyne Avenue on June 22 at ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II A 2, III C