The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 14, 1894
    Russian Extradition Treaty with America Opposed Fight against the Treaty Continues; Efforts Made to Abolish it (Editorial)

    The problem of extraditing Russian criminals is not yet settled, although the extradition treaty between the United States and Russia was concluded not long ago. That this treaty is legal is a fact; yet it is being fought continually and energetic measures are being taken to abolish it.

    We are cognizant of the fact that the United States is governed by the people through their representatives, who are elected for this purpose. Since this is the case, this treaty with Russia--ratified at St. Petersburg on April 21, 1893, in spite of numerous protests--would become invalid if the majority of the people would declare that it is unconstitutional and not in agreement with the spirit of American freedom.

    2

    This treaty is of great importance to the Poles living in the United States. The Poles were very interested in it prior to its ratification and opposed it energetically.

    It will not be amiss to acquaint our readers with all the details of this problem up to the present moment.

    It is interesting to know that the opponents of this treaty did not lay down their weapons after its ratification, but promptly organized the so-called R. E. T. A. S. (Russian Extradition Treaty Abrogation Society), an association whose purpose is to abolish the agreement made between the United States and Russia, which provides for the extradition of criminals. This society, with headquarters at 100 Broadway, New York City, has thousands of members and supporters throughout the United States and even among the lovers of freedom in other countries.

    For about a year, the R. E. T. A. S. has been preparing a plan to fight this treaty, which is not in accord with the spirit of American freedom. Its plan 3is to prepare a huge petition, signed by thousands of American citizens, and present it to the President of the United States and both houses of Congress. In this manner, both the President and Congress, in accordance with the will of the people, will be obliged to take the necessary measures for abolishing the Russian extradition treaty.

    The R. E. T. A. S. expects to obtain at least five hundred thousand signatures for the petition.

    The R. E. T. A. S. has already taken the first step in this direction by preparing and distributing a draft of the general petition to be sent to the President of the United States, the Senate, and the House of Representatives. This document, according to the reports of the American press, has been carefully prepared. By legal and philosophical argumentation, the document proves that the Russian extradition treaty with the United States is unjust, unnecessary, and unconstitutional. The truth of this contention is proved by many arguments and quotations taken from several sources, such as Leroy Beaulieu's L'Empire 4des Tzars et les Russes, George Kennan's works, the Constitution of the United States, the United States court decisions, opinions of the Attorney-General, and other legal sources.

    In the draft of the general petition all provisions are very carefully analyzed, and the faults [of the treaty] are explained in detail. It advances many facts about Russian judicature. However, the most important argument is based on the general principle that such a treaty cannot be made between a free and constitutional government and a government ruled by a despot, whose subjects, according to the old accepted theory of John Locke, have a right to revolt.

    We are sorry that so far we have not received a copy of the draft of the general petition. We have made a request for it, and as soon as we receive it we will take up this subject again, to which we only wish to attract the attention of our countrymen today. In our opinion, if so much effort is made by other people in order to abolish this treaty, then we American Poles should also give a helping hand. Signatures of American citizens of Polish 5extraction should appear on this petition, which our countrymen should support with their whole might.

    The problem of extraditing Russian criminals is not yet settled, although the extradition treaty between the United States and Russia was concluded not long ago. That this treaty is legal ...

    Polish
    III B 1, III H, I J
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 28, 1897
    Protest against the Immigration Bill (Editorial)

    Yesterday the House of Representatives passed the Immigration Bill. Many sections of this bill will stand in the way of those of our compatriots in Europe who may wish to settle here in the future.

    For this reason, the presidents of all Polish-American organizations and the editors of all Polish papers of Chicago have agreed to send a telegram to the Senate, protesting against the passage of this bill in its present form.

    A memorial, to be presented at protest meetings to be held by the Chicago Poles, will also be sent away with the telegram.

    Further particulars will be given tomorrow.

    Yesterday the House of Representatives passed the Immigration Bill. Many sections of this bill will stand in the way of those of our compatriots in Europe who may wish to ...

    Polish
    III B 1, III G
  • Narod Polski -- January 19, 1898
    Protest to Senator Lodge's bill: to the House of Representatives, Wash., D. C

    We, the undersigned, represent thousands of Polish people in America, belonging to churches, societies and political organizations to protest Sen. Lodge's bill on Immigration.

    Due to the merciless persecution of the Polish people in their native land, it is not strange that they should emigrate in such large numbers to the land of freedom; where they can enjoy the economical and political advantages, that are denied them in their native land.

    It is not fitting that Senator Lodge, in his bill claims that a great number of illiterates are found among the Polish people.

    The illiterates in this country soon take advantage of our system of education and self-interest, and take it upon themselves to learn to read and write English.

    2

    It is a convincing fact, if closely observed, that the Polish people are clean, orderly and law abiding citizens. At great expense they have established numerous schools, churches, libraries and places of recreation.

    They do not support any socialistic or anarchistic doctrines; and show the deepest respect for this country and its institutions.

    We have only a short time in which to prove that the figures quoted by Senator Lodge are far from being correct, about the Polish people.

    Mr. F. H. Jablonski, President of the Polish National Alliance of the United States of America, has received numerous letters from mayors, and police officials giving him their hearty support in the protest of Senator Lodges Immigration bill.

    We, the undersigned, represent thousands of Polish people in America, belonging to churches, societies and political organizations to protest Sen. Lodge's bill on Immigration. Due to the merciless persecution of ...

    Polish
    III G, III B 2, III B 1, I E, IV
  • Narod Polski -- February 14, 1900
    "About the Population Census"

    The editor of Narod Polski received a letter from Mr. Geo. F. Gilbert, the census supervisor of the First District of Illinois, with information from the director of the census in Washington, D. C., pertaining to Polish nationality.

    The census enumerators are instructed to ask specifically all those whose native language is Polish, whether they came from Prussian, Austrian, or Russian Poland. This information will not only enable the director of census to determine how large a number of the population in the United States comes from Germany, Austria, or Russia, but will also define the Poles as of distinct national individuality, irrespective of the country of origin, and show their numerical strength in the United States.

    This editor requests all Poles to comply with the ruling and, as to their nationality, answer plainly and explicitly that they are Poles born either in Prussian, Austrian, or Russian Poland.

    The editor of Narod Polski received a letter from Mr. Geo. F. Gilbert, the census supervisor of the First District of Illinois, with information from the director of the census ...

    Polish
    III A, III B 1, I C
  • Narod Polski -- March 23, 1902
    "Remarks"

    The last issue of Zgoda is appealing to the Polish press to take up the matter of erecting a monument of Gen. Casimir Pulaski and to explain to all groups and associations that only throughout united action will it be able to influence the government to build this monument.

    The Central Committee of the Polish Roman Catholic Union has sent form letters to different groups and they in turn, and according to the instructions, have sent them to their congressmen. The Central Committee is already receiving letters from the congressmen with their assurances that this project has their cooperation and full support.

    If the groups in the parishes have not yet received the printed circulars pertaining to this matter they are urged to immediately ask Mr. Krolik, general secretary, for them, and they will be sent to them without delay.

    The last issue of Zgoda is appealing to the Polish press to take up the matter of erecting a monument of Gen. Casimir Pulaski and to explain to all groups ...

    Polish
    II C, III B 2, III B 1, IV
  • Narod Polski -- April 18, 1902
    Regarding Pulaski Monument - Appeal to All

    We beg to follow the instructions in the above matter, to speed up the action of Congress.

    At present it is most important to have the bill passed by Congress for the building of a monument,which bill is now in hands of a committee called Committee on Library, which committee has to insist on the passing on the bill bearing the number 16 by the House of Representatives.

    The Central Committee empowered Col. Smolinski, at Washington, D. C., to have a meeting of senators and congressmen representing a large number of Polish constituents, to assist the passing of Bill 16 in due time.

    Local committees have to be organized which have to be in contact with the Central Committee.

    Countrymen, we have the opportunity to erect a monument of one of our outstanding heroes in a foreign country at the expense of the United States. We have to show by our work that Poland still lives in us.

    Central Committee.

    We beg to follow the instructions in the above matter, to speed up the action of Congress. At present it is most important to have the bill passed by Congress ...

    Polish
    II C, III B 1, III B 2
  • Narod Polski -- July 09, 1902
    "Remarks"

    Shortly before closing of the session of Congress $50,000 was voted for a monument of Kasimir Pulaski. Due to the efforts of Col. Smolinski and Polish residents this was accomplished.

    We will have a monument of the lover of liberty, who spilled his blood and gave his life for a foreign country.

    Shortly before closing of the session of Congress $50,000 was voted for a monument of Kasimir Pulaski. Due to the efforts of Col. Smolinski and Polish residents this was accomplished. ...

    Polish
    II C, III B 1, I J
  • Narod Polski -- September 24, 1902
    Americans about Pulaski

    In the newly received report from the convention of the American organization General Society, Sons of the Revolution, which was recently held in Washington, we find on pages 38, 39 and 40 a matter pertaining to the monument of Pulaski.

    Barry Buckley, delegate from the District of Columbia, turned the attention of other delegates to bill No. 16, which had been placed before the House of Representatives. The bill asks for the erection of a monument for Pulaski. Mr. Buckley spoke as follows:

    "It is not necessary to bring before you the merits of this distinguished patriot. I wish to call your attention to only one of a few points. Pulaski arrived in Philadelphia in the summer of 1777. He entered the service as a volunteer, he served in turn under General Washington, General Greene, General Wayne, General Sullivan, General La Fayette, Lincoln and others. At the battle of Brandywine, where the first shots 2were fired for American independence, his foresight, perseverance, and bravery were so marked that Washington made him chief of staff and requested Congress to give Pulaski the rank of Brigadier General. General Washington stated: "This gentleman, the same as ourselves, took part in preserving the liberty and independence of our country and sacrificed his fortune for our cause. For this we owe him our recognition, which should be to his benefit, so far as the good of the service permits."

    It is interesting to know that Pulaski was the father of American cavalry and was justly called "the eye of the army." As none of the officers carried a title ranking higher than that of colonel, Pulaski was the first general of cavalry appointed in the American Army.

    "Now, Mr. Chairman, France has been exceptionally honored by the beautiful monument of La Fayette, which stands on the corner of La Fayette Square in Washington. France was further distinguished by the monument of Rochambeau. To the society District of Columbia came the thought that 3there could not be carried through a more suitable deed and there cannot be marked out a more desirable quota from Congress than that which would erect at the other end of the square one monument to Kosciuszko and the other to Pulaski. I recommend, therefore, that our society, through its own officers, demand of the conforming committee in Congress this bill be accepted, which will state the necessary quota for this monument."

    Following delegate Buckley, Abraham Charles Kaufman, delegate from South Carolina said: "As a citizen from South Carolina, but above all as an American, I am proud that I have the occasion to present to this great convention a motion that it unanimously confirm this resolution."

    Such is the essence of a page from the convention of an American society about our Pulaski.

    In the newly received report from the convention of the American organization General Society, Sons of the Revolution, which was recently held in Washington, we find on pages 38, 39 ...

    Polish
    I J, III B 1, II C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 08, 1903
    Poles in Chicago "Monument of Pulaski"

    In these days the senate library committee will take under consideration a bill of erecting a monument of Gen. Pulaski in Washington, at the expense of the government. The head of this committee, Senator Geo. Peabody Wetmore promised, that he will take the bill under consideration after the holidays.

    In these days the senate library committee will take under consideration a bill of erecting a monument of Gen. Pulaski in Washington, at the expense of the government. The head ...

    Polish
    II C, III B 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 12, 1904
    Unveiling of Kosciuszko Monument An Archbishop Assures Us That "Poland Lives"

    Procession:

    To raise funds for his monument, picnics were given in honor of Kosciuszko, and the attendance was so great that it cannot be estimated.

    At last the day of unveiling of the monument came to reality. Early yesterday morning the skies were cloudy but this did not discourage the people; trains from all over the country were filled with people coming to witness this great memorial. Many spoke the Polish language and wore the badges of different organizations and societies beside the Kosciuszko button.

    About noon time, between North Avenue on the north, Chicago Avenue on the south, the River on the east, and Paulina Street on the west, Polish people began to meet at their respective places; the Sokol and different church organizations began congregating and were anxious to start. Beautiful carriages could be seen standing, awaiting the signal, and policemen on horseback were doing their utmost to maintain law and order. On the main streets where the paraders were to march could be seen houses decorated with flowers; flowers 2strewn over the streets, Polish and American flags, different Polish banners, and a picture of Kosciuszko - the hero of two nations - in almost every window.

    About 300 societies from different cities began taking their respective places while the orchestra played Polish marches and the people shouted and whistled from joy. The people marched on Paulina Street to Division; west on Division to California Avenue; north on California to Wabansia Avenue; west to Humboldt Boulevard, and then south to the monument.

    At 1 o'clock the different Sokols marched on exhibition, lead by a Polish marshal, following the Sokols came a platoon of police, the state militia, the Guards of Kosciuszko, from Milwaukee; the Golden Order of Sokols followed by the building committee responsible for the erection of this monument; organizers of different societies, bishops, priests, and many more people of distinction.

    After the cheering quieted down a number of orchestras, the First Corps of the Polish Army consisting of Hussars, Cracovians, cadets, sharpshooters; the Columbia Marines; a band from Hawthorne and Kensington - all combined as one band, played Polish songs and marches.

    3

    The second division consisting of societies from La Salle, Toledo, and Michigan City, marched in review, followed by societies and groups from Kensington, Blue Island, Harvey, and South Chicago. In all, there were twelve divisions in review.

    We are nearing the park where thousands of people are massed near the monument and the police finally made the main boulevard clear for the officials. The lawn on the right-hand side of the monument was occupied by men's and women's choirs, which totaled 700 singers; a stand in the center was occupied by an orchestra accompanying the choir singers. Then an exhibition was given by 1,500 men and women; women marching from the left side and men from the right side, which was a splendid spectacle.

    At the foot of the monument we had the American flag on one side, Polish on the other and in between the banners of the Wisconsin State Militia, known as the "Guards of Kosciuszko," consisting entirely of Poles.

    Next came John F. Smulski, vice-president of the Polish committee responsible for this splendid monument, and he highly praised all the people for their kind contributions which had made it possible to erect this monument. All 4the church choirs under the direction of Emily Wiedensmana sang "Kosciuszko looks at us from Heaven."

    Before unveiling the monument Mr. Smulski read the following telegram from President Theodore Roosevelt:

    My dear Sir:

    I wish it were possible for me to be present in person on the occasion of the unveiling of the monument of the great patriot Kosciuszko. It has been my good fortune to help in securing the erection of monuments in Washington, both of Kosciuszko and Pulaski. They are entitled to the love and veneration of all Americans no less than all Poles, and indeed I may go further and in justice say that they are entitled to the profound admiration and respect of all lovers of free government throughout the world.

    It is eminently proper that the monument of Kosciuszko should be erected in the great City of Chicago. Here in the United States a new people has been formed, and is still in process of formation. This people derives its blood from many different Old World sources. Each nation has already contributed much of 5value to our citizenship and its share toward the leadership of the nation. In the Revolutionary War men like the Poles, Kosciuszko and Pulaski; like the Frenchmen, La Fayette and Rochambeau; like the German, Steuben; like the Irishman, Barry; like the Scotchman, Paul Jones, came over to help our struggling nationality - a nationality already of mixed ethnic origin as shown by the names of our generals who won distinction in the field as supporters of Washington - men like Wayne, Greene, Sullivan, Muhlenberg, Schuyler, Marion, Sumter, and Putnam. So it was in the time of the Civil War, when all our people without regard to diversity in national origin, rallied to the defense of the flag they, all alike, held so dear.

    Here in the United States we are all alike endeavoring to do our duty as good citizens and the only rivalry we know is the generous rivalry in good citizenship.

    I congratulate you and your associates on the admirable work you have done in connection with the erection of this statue to so great a man and I only wish it were in my power to greet you in person.

    With renewed good wishes and felicitations, believe me

    Sincerely yours

    Theodore Roosevelt.

    6

    After Mr. Smulski read the President's message, Miss Mario Szopinski pulled the cord that unveiled the monument, which was greeted by whistling, tooting horns, and clapping of hands.

    This monument was built by Kazimierz Chodzynski. The members of the committee are M. A. La Buy, John F. Smulski, Leon Szopinski, T. M. Helinski, M. Stecynski, Michael Majewski, P. O. Stenland, Joseph Palczynski, Stan Bokusz, and Adam Majewski.

    Procession: To raise funds for his monument, picnics were given in honor of Kosciuszko, and the attendance was so great that it cannot be estimated. At last the day of ...

    Polish
    II C, III B 2, III B 1, IV