The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- March 13, 1889
    Polish Falcons

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically.

    It is well known, dear fellow men, that the above mentioned society has now and will have the following aims:

    First, to lend a helping hand whenever needed and to live in peace amongst ourselves like brothers. To join with other organizations, like the Polish National Alliance, and by it help to build a Polish hall here in Chicago.

    Second, to produce Polish theatricals, recitals, concerts, etc., as by this alone we shall obstruct the path to evil into which our youth might fall. So for this reason I make a plea to our friends, especially to the Polish youth, to join our Polish-American Falcons' organization, and by working together we will show other nationalities that our Polish mother doesn't 2need to be ashamed of her children.

    So come young and old to our meetings that take place every first Sunday of the month at 2 o'clock in the afternoon in the hall of Mr. Nalepinski, at Noble and Chopin street.

    As to the question of building a Polish hall, it could be accomplished in a short while.

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically. It is well ...

    Polish
    III E, II B 3, III B 2, II E 3, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 15, 1891
    Dziennik Chicagoski Is One Year Old (Editorial)

    Today [December 15, 1891], a year has passed since the first issue of Dziennik Chicagoski appeared. Did it serve any purpose? Did it benefit anyone morally or materially? What were its merits and deficiencies? If its publication is to be continued, should it make any changes or add anything?

    These questions ought to be answered by the readers, not by the publishers. The publishers may only guess at the wishes of the readers; they can make deductions from verbal remarks and newspaper criticism, be they orderly and constructive or malicious and destructive.

    Three hundred and six issues of Dziennik Chicagoski have been published with clock-like regularity during its first year of existence--14 in 1890 and 292 during this year. There were no issues on 59 days--52 Sundays 2and 7 holidays. Some of these holidays were national; others Catholic. Consequently, there can be no objection to this. Polish newspapers in Europe publish still fewer issues in a year.

    Dziennik Chicagoski, in the first place, brings material benefit indirectly to those who advertise in it. This is proved by the fact that no advertisement was withdrawn for lack of good results; also, by the fact that more and more business people advertise in it. The policy of Dziennik Chicagoski is not to accept certain advertisements, even if they are profitable.

    Dziennik Chicagoski has also brought material benefit to those who looked for employment in its help-wanted columns, as well as to those who placed these advertisements in it. Finally, Dziennik Chicagoski must have brought some material benefit to those who have bought articles advertised in its columns. These material benefits point out the usefulness of this newspaper and the necessity for its further existence.

    The moral benefit which Dziennik Chicagoski has brought and should bring is 3manifold, and it will be still greater as the newspaper develops. As a political newspaper, devoted to the interests of the Poles in the United States, Dziennik Chicagoski enlightens its readers on political questions. The Poles are primarily concerned with affairs taking place on Polish soil. They are also interested in the affairs of the Poles in America, as well as in American public affairs, in which Poles should take and active part. Finally, the Poles are interested in the affairs of other countries (especially of those which concern us most--hostile Russia, Germany and Austria) and of the United States. That we have diligently supplied our readers with information concerning Polish and other affairs will be admitted by any reader of Dziennik Chicagoski. To prove this, we will give a brief account of all events during the year before it is over. This will serve as evidence that our newspaper has fulfilled its purpose.

    The moral benefit of a newspaper should not be limited only to furnishing facts. The columns of some newspapers are full of news items that do not bring any benefit. On the contrary, they rather spread moral corruption. Some of the great thinkers of this free United States realize this and are trying to remove this evil by a legislative measure prohibiting publication of sensational news, especially descriptions of crimes, scandals, unconfirmed gossips, etc. That such 4prohibition would not affect us, we can say with clear conscience. As to other Polish newspapers, let them answer that themselves with their hands upon their hearts. Besides furnishing facts, a newspaper has also other tasks, such as making suggestions, creating or influencing public opinion, and stimulating thought, action, and plans which bring benefit to the public.

    We do not claim that we are perfect in this last respect. Perhaps it was possible to accomplish more than we did.

    In the first place, we must refer to our long controversy on the school question, which was conducted in the early issues of our journal. This controversy was absolutely necessary, because an attempt was made to discredit parochial schools and to prove that the public schools in America are more beneficial to the Poles than the Polish parochial schools, and because the same interests tried to convince the Polish-American public that the hope of instilling national aspirations in our young generation is merely a dream.

    In the second place, it was necessary for us to prevent the Poles, during the 5spring election, from splitting into two parties, and to encourage them by continuous efforts, urging them to take active part in the elections. Never before did so many Poles vote as in the last spring election, and American newspapers pointed out with astonishment--the fact that the Poles constitute a strong political unit. Is this not meritorious? Does not Dziennik Chicagoski deserve at least some credit for this? Let impartial persons answer this. Other Polish newspapers were making sarcastic remarks about our journal, stating that we devote whole columns to politics. But, was this not our duty at that time?

    There were celebrations commemorating the Constitution of the Third of May. We devoted much space to these celebrations. There were conventions and conferences. Dziennik Chicagoski succeeded in furnishing detailed reports about them and presented its suggestions according to its own viewpoint.

    This viewpoint is somewhat different from the one held by other newspapers. It is not strictly partial, it does not belong exclusively to a certain organization, and it does not deny opposing parties the right to exist, yet it is 6not exactly impartial.

    Dziennik Chicagoski is of the opinion that certain organizations are better, more just, more beneficial, and that others are not so well organized. It does not regard any organization as perfect or worthy of condemnation. It sees merits and imperfections in all of them. It desires that these merits should be increased to the highest degree and that the faults should be diminished as much as possible, and for this reason it carries on politics of conciliatory nature, which gives some persons an excuse to give vent to jeers and malicious attacks.

    Dziennik Chicagoski defends and will defend the Polish clergy, who are furiously attacked by some organizations. We do not understand the phrase, "I am a Catholic, but I do not wish to be led by a priest, or that he should be interested in patriotism." We do not understand this, for it is hard to understand, but we do know that the Poles owe to the priests the circumstance that they are not denationalized. They should also be thankful to the priests for the fact that the police records show very few Polish names; that wherever 7there is a Polish church, the morality of the Poles is admired by other nationalities, while in localities where there are no priests, other nationalities compare them with Italians, Slovaks, and Chinese. The Poles owe even their prosperity to the Polish priests, for properties located near Polish churches are valuable, and their owners have political influence. Polish organizations also are indebted to Polish priests, for, on account of their strength, they have gained influence and their members can obtain better employment. We fought and will continue to fight because we feel that by so doing we benefit the Polish public. We should like to know where these prosperous Poles would be today--whether they would be wealthy if they did not have priests.

    We desire to influence public opinion by other means. We are obliged from time to time to engage in a controversy, but we always try to limit it to the subject--with decency. As soon as our opponents resort to insulting personal attacks, we discontinue it.

    For quite a time, there has appeared in Polish circles and newspapers a project mania, a wave of new ideas. New plans have grown like mushrooms after the rain. But, are they really new? They have one defect--they are quite 8often planned less skillfully than the original ones. If someone blames us for not participating in them, we will answer that we have lived long enough to look soberly at such matters. We certainly will not remain silent if a clear and practical plan is presented, but as long as such projects are only unskillful imitations of the old ones, we prefer to keep silent.

    Summa Summarum. Is our journal useful if it brings material and moral benefit to its readers? The answer must be that it is. But this does not mean that it fulfills its purpose completely, that it has no defects, or that it is not susceptible to improvement.

    The aim of our journal in the next year will be the attainment of perfection. From January 1, 1892, its format and contents will be different. We will keep what was good; what was defective we will try to improve, and what was improper will be changed. The management will be placed in better hands, and the personnel will probably be increased.

    With the conviction that we have fulfilled conscientiously our duty to the 9public, with appreciation for the good will shown us by the public; and forgetting malicious slanders, we are completing the first year of editing Dziennik Chicagoski. It was a successful year for the journal in spite of the ominous prophecies of some persons. This infant, that saw daylight for the first time a year ago today, is healthy, and as far as human eye can see there is no obstacle to its future growth.

    Today [December 15, 1891], a year has passed since the first issue of Dziennik Chicagoski appeared. Did it serve any purpose? Did it benefit anyone morally or materially? What were ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, I A 1 a, I A 2 a, II E 3, I F 4, III A, III C, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 13, 1893
    Polish Entertainment (Editorial)

    In the last issue of the Pittsburgh Przyjaciel Ludu (Friend of the People], the following item appeared:

    "Last Saturday there was a bit of music in the home of a certain F. Figiel..... At about midnight, the guests became so noisy and disorderly that the host asked them to leave. A few of them took offense and a brawl resulted, in which Figiel was wounded in the chest with a knife. The wound is deep but not fatal. The attacker, who hid under a bed in panic, was arrested by the police and held pending trial."

    Also, the latest issue of the Baltimore Polonia carries this item from Warren, Massachusetts:

    "A Polish wedding took place here, at which almost all of the local Polish 2colony was present. Until midnight, six barrels of beer were consumed; then a brawl started. Knives and hatchets came into action and a near-riot ensued. The hand of Jacob Augustyn was almost hacked off, and Joseph Golen was wounded in the face. The chief offenders, Golen and Komiski, were arrested and will be duly punished."

    These two items are only samples of what can be regularly found in this or that Polish-American newspaper. It is deplorable news. It seems to prove that many of our countrymen who have come to this free land do not attempt to raise themselves to the level of true American civilization. That civilization depends, among other things, upon observance of laws, peaceableness, and temperance. Some of our countrymen cannot seem to enjoy themselves except by starting with liquor and ending with a brawl.

    The results of these incidents are very unpleasant to us. Disturbances caused by a few cast an unpleasant reflection on all of us and create a very unfavorable opinion of Poles in general, to say nothing of the sin 3against God and the damage to health and property, for these are obvious to everybody.

    These violent methods of entertainment among the Poles in America must be brought to an end. Drunkenness, scandals, and brawls ought to cease. The Polish newspapers, priests, and societies ought to take a strong stand on this problem. Let us severely condemn all such outbreaks, let us never cease repeating that such outbreaks are scandalous and harmful and that they must stop. Let serious people teach the youth, wives their husbands, and parents their children the infamy of entertainment which leads to bestiality and crime, and surely there will be some results.

    No one denies anyone else the right to decent entertainment. One can dance and enjoy oneself and drink a glass of beer on occasion; but to drink like swine and to engage in subsequent brawls with knives and hatchets is a sin, a disgrace, and a crime.

    In the last issue of the Pittsburgh Przyjaciel Ludu (Friend of the People], the following item appeared: "Last Saturday there was a bit of music in the home of a ...

    Polish
    I B 1, II E 3, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 04, 1896
    Warning to the Poles!

    Mr. Peter Kiolbassa has asked us to publish a warning against a certain swindler who is taking advantage of the Poles.

    This person is James B. Leckie, who, advertising himself as the manager of the Chicago Merchants' Police, has extracted from the people various sums deposits for jobs as night watchmen.

    This Leckie is a first-class swindler, who has already served a few jail sentences for similar crimes. His office is at 921 Monroe Street.

    Mr. Kiolbassa advises the Poles not to have any business dealings with this man Leckie or his office, if they don't wish to be losers.

    Leckie is so infamous that he has even attempted to advertise his Merchants' Police in our paper. As soon as we discovered the kind of man behind the 2company, we, of course, canceled his advertisement at once.

    One of those swindled by Leckie is a Pole, Mr. John Kowalski of 38 Sloan Street.

    He gave Leckie one hundred and fifty dollars as a deposit and it is doubtful whether he will get his money back. We have examined the contract given to Kowalski and found it was prepared in a very tricky way.

    We therefore warn our Polish citizens not to deposit any money without first considering the matter carefully, and especially without some sort of guarantee or bond insuring them against swindlers.

    Mr. Peter Kiolbassa has asked us to publish a warning against a certain swindler who is taking advantage of the Poles. This person is James B. Leckie, who, advertising himself ...

    Polish
    II E 3, IV
  • Narod Polski -- April 30, 1902
    "Local News."

    In spite of all denials, one may safely say that some persecuting fate has invaded the Sixteenth Ward and it is so much more surprising because all this ill-luck and misfortune seems to date from the last aldermanic elections. Robberies in the ward are a daily occurrence. Mere children are shooting each other or cutting each other up with knives. Not so long age the General Secretary of the Polish Roman Catholic Union, returning home at night after the bank meeting, was held up and dangerously wounded, a few other citizens were robbed. Mr. Golinski was shot to death, Mr. Natupski died from wounds after being stabbed with a knife by his own son and only last week Mr. Folinski and his son were murdered. It all happened on Noble St. between Blackhawk and Bradley Streets. These sad very shameful occurrences prove most eloquently the bestially of morals of our young people that commit such crimes.

    Mostly to blame for this state of affairs are the parents who permit their children to roam the streets at all hours of the night.

    But the carelessness and laxity of the police must also be blamed, for one never sees a police officer in our ward. We must also mention 2our local politicians who defend and protect the wrong-doers, especially when the crime was "the settling of some political accounts." The political hooligans and gangsters are brazen in violating all rules of decency and law, knowing that they will not be punished and most of the time not even brought to court.

    The victims are all innocent and defenseless people.

    Unfortunately our very big parish cannot exert a better influence in spite of the best efforts and intentions of our pastor it is impossible for him to have proper control over this immense mass of our young people.

    In spite of all denials, one may safely say that some persecuting fate has invaded the Sixteenth Ward and it is so much more surprising because all this ill-luck and ...

    Polish
    II E 2, I F 6, II E 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 14, 1907
    Attention!

    The voice of God shall spread all over the world... to every nation... to teach lessons in getting rid of murders, robbers, diseases in general, insanity and accidents... how to open jails ... free prisoners.. and convert jails into churches for the new generation.

    In every school, all over the world, children must be taught reverence for God and His Ten Commandments... and their catechism.

    My dear children, brothers and sisters... God is asking you to learn and obey his commandments and all the catechism... to use it as a guide through your entire life... every step of the way until death, to save you from the penalties of sin and crime.

    Then, and not before, will the jails be turned to churches for the benefit of our new generations.

    Why should we not be satisfied to live peacefully in such a beautiful 2world, when God has created everything for us? Even the tiny bee works for us collecting pollen to make honey for our enjoyment and benefit. Why do we rob each other? Why do we kill each other? Why are we filled with jealousy, envy, greed, and all forms of diseases, including insanity, in this world? It is merely because we forget to follow the commandments of God and the teachings of Jesus Christ.

    We are, each and everyone, merely human beings; but we must receive that power into our mind and heart, and keep it there forever. Then we will be able to love each other, replacing the present conditions with a spirit of peace.

    The death knell will then be sounded on the present conditions of murdering, stealing, robbing, diseases in general (including insanity), and accidents; in fact, all that contributes towards any form of unhappiness. Then jails shall become places of worship as well as asylums where - as human beings prayer and thanks may be offered to God.

    The voice of God shall spread all over the world... to every nation... to teach lessons in getting rid of murders, robbers, diseases in general, insanity and accidents... how to ...

    Polish
    III C, II E 3
  • Narod Polski -- April 24, 1907
    Local Chronicie

    The pages of criminal statistics are more and more filled with Polish names.

    Chicago is not in the last place. Polish colonies are furnishing plenty of material for the newspapers, bringing shame to us Poles.

    Not so long ago a man of Polish descent committed suicide, drinking poison. His father, citizen Dominowski, operates several saloons. He has a good reputation and "honest income."

    The young man was a good draughtsman. His future was promising but his bad habits get the best of him, making him wild. He took the wrong path of life and as a result he is lying today on the slab.

    Crime does not pay. This is the warning to the parents. They should watch their children very closely. In a case where the children are going wrong, report at once to the court. Better to be ashamed now then to wait till he commits the actual crime. Parents, save your honor!

    <p/> The pages of criminal statistics are more and more filled with Polish names. Chicago is not in the last place. Polish colonies are furnishing plenty of material for the ...

    Polish
    II E 2, II E 3
  • Narod Polski -- September 04, 1907
    Polish Women's Section Saver of Polish Girl

    Miss Mary Margaret Lee, a student of Chicago University, also secretary of the Women's Trade Union League, saved an immigrant girl from Poland, by the name of M. Kroslak.

    The Women's Trade Union League, New York, sent an advance notice of girls journeying from Europe to Chicago. Miss Lee received a list of the girls sent to Chicago. She then went to the railroad station to check the names, and, after counting them all, found that M. Kroslak, a newcomer from Poland, was missing.

    She started an investigation and, after searching for her several days, found her in a suspicious home. She tried to get in the house, but no one answered. Finally, after a long period of time, the landlord opened 2the door and told Miss Lee that M. Kroslak was working in a boarding house and making good money.

    Miss Lee did not believe this and with the help of another member released her, and then had the landlord arrested.

    Miss Mary Margaret Lee, a student of Chicago University, also secretary of the Women's Trade Union League, saved an immigrant girl from Poland, by the name of M. Kroslak. The ...

    Polish
    III G, II E 3
  • Dziennik Ludowy -- August 26, 1908
    The Results of Enlightenment; Effects of Clerical Teachings

    The 'clericals' are reaping an abundant harvest from their teachings. On the 22nd day of this month, at midnight, a tragedy took place among the 'foster children' of the 'clericals,' on 25th Street near Rockwell, resulting in a very abundant harvest. One of the fighters, John Okraska, residing at 319 W. 25th Street, was stabbed with a knife near his heart. He is in a very critical condition - perhaps he is dead now. He was wounded by Jacob Czarnecki, residing on 24th Street. Two other men, who tried to stop the fight, received wounds in their hands by the same hero of clerical ignorance.

    The place where the fight occurred represents a terrible sight today. So much blood was shed that I was horrified at the sight of it.

    2

    Such scenes of life in our Polish settlements, where drinking and fighting is an every day occurrence, are very bad.

    During the six-week stay in Chicago, in the vicinity of St. Casimir's Parish, I have not seen a peaceful Saturday - a Saturday without a fight .... and in the same place.

    Whose fault is it?

    Of course, all will say that it is their own fault.

    The fault lies with our dear priests and the 'patriotic' saloon keepers. The first - that is, the priests - keep our poor people in stupidity from the very cradle; they keep them in the worst kind of ignorance. The second - that is, the saloon keepers - demoralize our younger generation to such a low degree that it is hard to believe.

    3

    When such a saloon keeper, with a big belly and the emblem (a button) of the Polish National Alliance, or the Polish Roman-Catholic Union, finds himself behind a bar, he coaxes the young people to drink with the sweetest phrases that his base soul can afford. This is how the clergy and patriotism bring up our new generation.

    The time is approaching when the working man will find out that he is being terribly cheated and kept in ignorance. He will reject today's teachings of the 'Black Ravens' and saloon patriots, and will join the ranks of the Socialists, where there is light and truth.

    The 'clericals' are reaping an abundant harvest from their teachings. On the 22nd day of this month, at midnight, a tragedy took place among the 'foster children' of the 'clericals,' ...

    Polish
    II E 2, III C, I E, II E 3
  • Dziennik Ludowy -- September 05, 1908
    Archbishop Ryan against Public Schools

    On account of public schools we have a rich growth of weeds, lawlessness and socialism. Modernism has been condemned on account of its work, which will end in the ruin of the nation.

    This statement was made by Archbishop Ryan at the thirty-fourth annual convention of Catholic youth, which is being held in Philadelphia, Pa.

    The teaching of various subjects in schools is unnecessary, according to the viewpoint of the Archbishop, because only church and monastic teachings will bring salvation to the nation. Idle complaints of a bishop will not change matters any.

    Foreigners Should Be Taught.

    The nation, continued the Archbishop, which depends for its growth to a certain degree on immigration, takes upon itself a great responsibility if it allows children of the immigrants, who in the future will become the citizens of that country, to grow and be brought up without the realization that only one religion can bring happiness and salvation.

    2

    It is our national fault, he further stated, that a third or sometimes fourth generation which were taught in our public schools have empty hearts. Such youth is like an uncultivated field full of weeds - lawless and socialistic - thereby ruining the moral welfare of the entire country.

    Let those who contributed toward the creation of such a system, or do not recognize God, love,or fear, take a good look at the characteristic signs of today's life; let them read the descriptions of every-day accidents, violations and abuses in different states; let them investigate the murders and crimes which disgrace the country, and they will be convinced of the very sad results.

    But the Archbishop has forgotten to add that in the most religious Catholic countries, there is the most ignorance, poverty, slavery and degradation, with crime flourishing as a result.

    As an example of such religious notions, the Archbishop should have mentioned Italy, Spain, Ireland and Poland.

    3

    There will be no progress in this country as long as the new element will continue to fall into the clutches of the "black vultures" in "spiritual robes".

    On account of public schools we have a rich growth of weeds, lawlessness and socialism. Modernism has been condemned on account of its work, which will end in the ruin ...

    Polish
    I A 1 a, II E 3