The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Dziennik Związkowy -- March 03, 1909
    (Notice)

    The women's department of the Polish National Alliance is arranging a Variety Evening, with a lecture, for the benefit of the Aged and Orphan's Home. The affair will take place at Alliance Hall 102-104 W. Division St., Sunday March 7, at 8:30 P.M. Tickets only 15 cents. The patronage of the generous public is solicited.

    The Committee.

    The women's department of the Polish National Alliance is arranging a Variety Evening, with a lecture, for the benefit of the Aged and Orphan's Home. The affair will take place ...

    Polish
    II D 5, II D 4, II D 1
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- February 07, 1910
    The Care of the Aged (Editorial)

    In April of last year the Legislature of the State of Illinois instructed the representatives of Illinois in Congress to support their colleague, Congressman Lundin, in a motion for an old-age pension law, similar to the many European pension laws now in force. As a result of this motion a committee of seven members was appointed to investigate and study the European pension laws and to make a report of their findings not later than January 1, 1911.

    This is a very important matter, and the United States as a civilized country, should adopt a pension system for the aged, similar to the pension laws in force throughout Europe.

    It is true that the pension system for the aged is a new idea, but it really has been tried out before, and with great success, in several countries.

    2

    Denmark made the first attempt; England, France, and Austria followed. Germany and other nations are also experimenting.

    The Danish system pays a pension to all workers of sixty years of age or over. The amount of the pension is based on the place of residence, the state of health, and various other stipulations.

    New Zealand adopted a pension system in 1897. This system has been constantly improved until in 1908 it was pronounced sufficient. It provides that all workers attaining the age of sixty-eight shall be eligible to the pension provided they can prove twenty-five years of residence and that they have never been convicted of a major crime. The amount of the pension is $2.50 per week. All persons in the country must contribute to the general fund, and the amount which each one contributes is so small that it is almost negligible. But to the thousands of old people these pensions are a lifesaver. Although the amount of the pension is small, it is enough to provide them with the bare necessities of 3life. They do not have to depend on their children or upon charity for their support.

    Comfortable homes with beautiful surroundings have been established for these old people. Here for ten dollars a month they can live in comfort and moderate luxury.

    Belgium established a pension in 1900; Italy, France, and Austria-Hungary have had a pension system for some time. It is being improved from year to year. Only recently they have decided to extend the pension privilege to all classes of people and to all the states in the country.

    Australia, after many trials, has finally established a pension law which went into effect July 1, 1909. This law provides that all women attaining the are of sixty and all men of sixty-five or over shall receive a pension of $2.50 per week.

    4

    The American consul at New Castle, New South Wales, writes that the establishment of the pension law was received with great praise. It is a necessary and forward step in the economic life of the people. I have watched about four hundred old people receive their pensions. It was a touching sight, and it more than ever convinced me of the need of similar legislation in the United States.

    England established a pension system only recently, and in comparison with other countries the amount to be received by the old people is very meager. It provides for a pension of 25 cents to 1.25 per week to all who have attained the age of seventy. We understand that Canada has adopted the same system. Norway and Sweden are now working out a pension system. In Germany a pension system was established in 1891 and another in 1899, but they were similar to the Italian and Austro-Hungarian pension systems, which applied only to a certain class of people and affected only about twenty-five per cent of the total population. Russia, Turkey, Spain, and Portugal have no pension system as yet and 5are not very progressive. The United States and South America are also without any pension system.

    Congress should pass a pension law. We as a progressive country should hang our heads in shame. We are now classed with the most backward and unprogressive nations. Vast sums of money are spent for all manner of welfare work in the United States. Hospitals, shelters, orphan homes, homes for the aged, homes for the blind and for the crippled and many others are scattered throughout the country, financed by public funds, by private donations, and by charitable organizations.

    Nevertheless many people die of hunger, cold and disease. A meager pension of $2.50 a week would eliminate a great deal of this suffering among those unable to work because of old age.

    Many corporations are establishing pension systems for their employes; the railroads are doing likewise.

    6

    The Polish National Alliance at its last convention decided to build a home for the aged and crippled and is determined to find a way by which the death benefits will be payable in whole or in part in case the beneficiary is crippled for life.

    In April of last year the Legislature of the State of Illinois instructed the representatives of Illinois in Congress to support their colleague, Congressman Lundin, in a motion for an ...

    Polish
    I H, II D 1, II D 5
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- November 02, 1911
    Welcoming the New Central Administration of the Polish National Alliance

    The Central Administration of the Polish National Alliance, elected by the Eighteenth Convention held at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, became inoperative today, November 2, 1911. The old Administration has just been replaced by a new one, elected at the Nineteenth Convention of the Alliance, held in St. Louis, Missouri. The changes in the personnel of the Central Administration are slight; perhaps there are fewer changes this time than there were at the Milwaukee Convention two years ago. Of the thirteen members who composed the retiring Administration, eight were elected again to the new, namely: A.Schreiber, censor; M.B.Steczynski, president; F.Ksycki, vice-president; S.J.Czechowicz, general-secretary; M.Majewski, treasurer; and M.Sakowska, M.Kmieciak, and N.Zlotnicki, directors. The editor of Zgoda, although re-elected by the Convention to fill this post, is not considered a member of the new Administration.

    The Nineteenth Convention separated this post from the Central Administration. None of the retiring officials and directors--former Vice-censor R.S.Abczynski 2and Directors J. Hetmanowicz, M.Wojtecki, and J.Wleklinski--ran for re-election at the Nineteenth Convention.

    Such a large representation of the old Central Administration in the ranks of the new is the best indication that the Nineteenth Convention justly evaluated the work and the abilities of the Administration elected two years ago at Milwaukee. The two years of attacks against these people in all kinds of newspapers opposed to the Alliance were of no avail; the truly maddening propaganda that certain Alliance politicians directed against them at the St. Louis Convention did not help either, since these politicians, together with a mob of their agents, had gone to the Convention, not for the purpose of working for the good of the Alliance, but to strike down the candidacy of certain people disliked by them but respected by the Alliance and the people. Nor was the decision of the delegates affected by the fact that, before the Convention, some self-appointed guardians of the Alliance--who themselves could not run for any office--mentioned by name the officers who, according to them, should be removed.

    3

    The Convention, as the expression of the will of the members of the Alliance, disregarded all this and passed to the order of the day, electing whom it wanted and whom it considered useful to the organization. By this action, the Convention itself gave its vote of confidence to the old Central Administration, which, as a result, should consider itself completely vindicated. The new Central Administration begins its work with a strengthened organization. The Convention, mindful of the fact that the increased membership of the Alliance requires more work on the part of its directors, increased the number of the latter from thirteen to fifteen. Another reason for this is that the censor and vice-censor live in outlying districts and cannot take part in the meetings and work of the committees. Having two more members, the new Administration, therefore, will be more active than the former, which should have a beneficial effect on the activities of the Alliance.

    The new Administration will certainly be just as busy as the old. Granting that the tasks of building a monument and of reconstructing the Immigration 4Home [in New York] are completed--tasks which required so much work and took up so much time in the last two years--yet there are other tasks, neither less difficult nor less important, which require attention. One of them is the building and opening of a home for the aged and the crippled; another is the election of an organizer, whose task will be to get new members for the Alliance. Then there will be the matter of the branches, as decreed by the Nineteenth Convention, which will cause at first no little work. And finally, the new Administration is faced with two problems recommended by the Nineteenth Convention, namely, to work out a plan for a future colonization society and to select a site, in the State of Pennsylvania, which would be best suited for the future school of the Alliance.

    Besides these specific problems, the continual and ever-increasing growth of the Alliance will bring its usual share of work to the Central Administration.

    Among the new people, in the Central Administration, who have not yet worked for the Alliance in the capacity of directors, are Vice-censor H.Niedzwiecki, 5of Cleveland, Ohio; Mrs. W. Chodzinska, already well known to the members of the Alliance for her work in the Women's Auxiliary; L. Mallek, a young attorney (son of Anthony Mallek, well known both here and in Poland as a musician and composer, formerly secretary-general of the Polish National Alliance); K. Zychlinski, also widely known both in America and Europe, organizer of the Falcons and an excellent speaker; W. Kuflewski, who has already served three terms in the capacity of director and who has gained for himself the reputation of an honorable man, well versed in matters concerning the Alliance; J. Szymanski, delegate to several conventions and well known for his work primarily among the singers; and S. Mermel, former clerk in the office of the secretary-general and a zealous organizer of Alliance groups, for which activity he was distinguished by the Seventeenth Convention in Baltimore with a medal of honor.

    The Nineteenth Convention, therefore, has placed the administration of the Alliance in capable hands for the next two years.

    6

    Dziennik Zwiazkowy extends its sincere greetings to the new leaders of our organization and wishes them luck, health, and the co-operation of all their brothers in the responsible and homorable task that awaits them.

    The Central Administration of the Polish National Alliance, elected by the Eighteenth Convention held at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, became inoperative today, November 2, 1911. The old Administration has just been replaced ...

    Polish
    III B 2, III B 4, II D 5, III A, III G, I C, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- November 04, 1911
    Report of Meeting of Women's Auxiliary of the Polish National Alliance

    The Women's Auxiliary held its meeting on November 3, at which Mrs. Walerya Lipczynska, commissioner for all the states, who has been in Chicago for several days, was present. The Auxiliary sincerely welcomed this real, indefatigable, and never-discouraged social worker. Mrs. M. A. Kuflewska opened the meeting and had Mrs. K. Bucholz the secretary, read the minutes. The minutes were unanimously accepted. The committees gave their reports.

    The organizing committee reported the establishment of new women's groups in several neighboring districts.

    The social committee was thanked for the well-arranged social evening for the benefit of the Home for the Aged and Crippled, and was asked to continue the good work. Nevertheless, since one of the ladies resigned because of lack of time, a new committee was elected and promised to arrange another such evening for the same purpose during Advent.

    2

    The committee for elementary schools gave a satisfactory report. A great many children are coming to the elementary schools in the Town of Lake and the vicinity of the Holy Trinity Parish. Fewer children attend the elementary school in Avondale due to the lack of an appropriate hall. All three elementary schools are functioning regularly and efficiently. The length of the school period and the amount of the teachers' pay have been finally fixed. The lessons are to last two hours; the salary is to be fifty cents per hour.

    The Women's Auxiliary realizes that the work of the teachers is worth more; it cannot, however, be reckless in its expenditures. Since one of the teachers has resigned due to lack of time, and since another school is to be established, two teaching positions will be open. These will be filled by competitive examinations.

    New business: It was decided to take part in the ceremonies attending the laying of the cornerstone of the new home of the Polish Women's Alliance. The 3Auxiliary has appropriated ten dollars as a gift.

    It was resolved to send reports of all the meetings of the Auxiliary to the commissioner, Mrs. Lipczynska.

    The meeting was adjourned.

    The Women's Auxiliary held its meeting on November 3, at which Mrs. Walerya Lipczynska, commissioner for all the states, who has been in Chicago for several days, was present. The ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 f, II D 5, II F, II C, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- November 08, 1911
    Home for the Aged and Crippled

    Mrs. M. Kuflewska, president of the Women's Auxiliary [of the Polish National Alliance], has turned over to the treasurer of the Auxiliary, money collected for the Home for the Aged and Crippled from the following persons: [Translator's note: List of names and amounts follow.] Total, $2.75.

    Mrs. M. Kuflewska, president of the Women's Auxiliary [of the Polish National Alliance], has turned over to the treasurer of the Auxiliary, money collected for the Home for the Aged ...

    Polish
    II D 5, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- November 24, 1911
    [Concert to Aid the Aged]

    A magnificent concert for the benefit of the St. Joseph Home for Aged People will be given at St. Stanislaus hall on December 3, at 8 P.M.

    Program: Opening numbers by Thomas' Orchestra, B. Rybowiak, conductor, March by Rybowiak, Overture by Rossini. Speeches by H. E. Bishop and P. Rhode. Boys' Church Orchestra. Solo: The Fifer by Niewiadomski, Springtime by Cadman, sung by J. Smulski, soprano. Violin solo: Serenade by Tchaikowsky; Capricio, Valse by Wieniawski, played by G. Hrusa. Solo: aria from the opera Queen of Sheeba, by Gounod, sung by L. Luther, basso. Sextet Lucia di Lammermoor by Donizetti, sung by Rose Kwasigroch, soprano; Helena Devlin, alto; Carol Rouse, baritone; P.S. Rybowiak, I tenor; A. Segal, II tenor; and L. Luther, basso; under the direction of H. Devries, with orchestra accompaniment. Orchestra: War. signals by Wronski. Solo: Venzano Valse by Vensani, sung by R. Kwasigroch, soprano. Harp solo by G. Smith. Chopin Quartet: Springtime by Gburski; The Dance of the Skeletons by Studzinski, singers: B. Rybowiak, I tenor; T. Kempski, II tenor; S. Smoczynski, I basso; W. Szillo, II Basso, and orchestra accompaniment.

    A magnificent concert for the benefit of the St. Joseph Home for Aged People will be given at St. Stanislaus hall on December 3, at 8 P.M. Program: Opening numbers ...

    Polish
    II B 1 a, II D 5, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- December 07, 1911
    Statement from the Session of Board of Supervisors

    Purchase building for a higher school.

    $175,000 has been paid for an estate estimated to be worth a million dollars. Cheerful news came to us from Cambridge Springs, Pa., where the board of supervisors, the commissioners of education of the Polish National Alliance, and chairman, A. Schreiber, held a conference and, after thorough inspection The Hotel Vanadium was purchased. It will be used as a college and home for the aged and invalid members of the Polish National Alliance.

    The following members of the P.N.A., and representatives of the Polish press were present: Censor of the P.N.A., A. Schreiber, Buffalo, N. Y; Vice-censor, H. Niedzwiedzki, Cleveland, O.; 13 Commissioners of the P.N.A. from various states, as members of the board of supervisors; 10 members of the board of directors, Chicago; J. Smietanka, Attorney for the P.N.A., and representatives of the following Polish papers: Dziennik Zwiazkowy, Zgoda, Dziennik Narodowy, from Chicago; Kurjer Polski, Nowiny Polskie, from Milwaukee; Dziennik Polski, Detroit; Narodowiec, Cleveland; and 13 members of the board of the P.N.A. from Pennsylvania.

    2

    The Delegates of the P.N.A. and Polish newspaper representative arrived on Tuesday to make an inspection of the Hotel Vanadium. The palatial hotel is a seven story structure with 400 rooms which are completely furnished. The building is surrounded with trees. Mineral and spring water, as well as a small lake form a part of the 200 acre property, which is located in the highest section of Cambridge - Springs.

    The building, erected at a cost of $700,000, had been used as a hotel and health resort for millionaires, but because of heavy losses was advertised for sale; and we were the lucky buyers.

    A contract for $175,000 was signed, and the Polish National Alliance will take immediate possession.

    Purchase building for a higher school. $175,000 has been paid for an estate estimated to be worth a million dollars. Cheerful news came to us from Cambridge Springs, Pa., where ...

    Polish
    III B 2, I A 1 a, II B 2 f, II D 5, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- December 11, 1911
    A Great Step Forward (Editorial)

    People of the Alliance [the Polish National Alliance], rejoice! Rejoice because you have accomplished a great thing in a foreign land! The dream of the founders and the pioneers of the Polish National Alliance has become a reality today. The college financed by the efforts of the Alliance is now completed, with all its luxurious appointments. It will serve not only members of the Alliance but all immigrants--even those in the mother country who cannot obtain an education in the national spirit, but must wander about in foreign institutions of learning.

    The Alliance, toward the end of 1911, took a great step forward; it demonstrated that it was not solely a life insurance company, as jealous and malicious people had often said, but showed concretely that it was a national organization of wide horizons--that it, by itself, accomplishes great things which posterity will acknowledge and evaluate, and which history will record in letters of gold in the annals of our deeds.

    2

    The Alliance is not merely looking ahead a short distance; it is establishing institutions not only for those people already belonging to it, but it is building the future of the Polish nation in America--it brings its successful work as a gift to the Mother Country.

    One of the greatest problems of every nation is the spreading of enlightenment among its masses. We Poles, through an unfortunate set of circumstances, either cannot obtain this enlightenment at all, under the rule of foreign invaders, or must obtain it from their poisoned wells, or must seek it in the various educational institutions of Europe, where, nevertheless, there is no Polish roof (sic)--where our young people are not educated to be good Polish citizens, understanding their duties--but where they get a standard education with its distorted interpretation of the duty which they owe their community.

    Enlightened members of the Alliance see this, and for this reason have decided 3to erect this institution of knowledge in the purely Polish spirit. For this reason members of the Alliance have willingly taxed themselves for a fund for a college, and in a relatively short time have been able, from their own resources, to erect a temple of learning, and will be able to maintain it without great effort--because a united people can be regarded as a great collective person, and our Alliance constitutes such a people. The most worthy and enlightened people gather under its banner, creating a united mass which accomplishes more and more miracles.

    At one stroke the Alliance has created a college and beside it, will found a haven for those of its champions who, exhausted by work and bent over with age, will not have to seek charity from strangers. Our great Alliance, therefore, is not only mindful of our young people, giving then knowledge and bringing them up in the true Polish spirit, but at the same time it does not forget its old folks who should be given aid, and whose declining years should be made happier under a Polish roof--their own roof.

    4

    The Alliance, therefore, has taken a great step forward which will lead it toward new paths of development and progress. The heart of every member of the Alliance today is filled with justifiable pride, and we look toward the future, which until now loomed so black, with renewed courage and hope.

    Chin up, Brothers and Sisters of the Alliance! Your hopes, your golden dreams have come true--the great building of the Alliance College already stands! All the facilities are now ready. It is necessary only to arrange classrooms, get the students, import the professors, and begin teaching. And all these things can be accomplished through the good will and work of all of us. Those hundreds of our young people scattered among various American educational institutions will surely flock to us, because under the roof of the Alliance school they will find greater comfort and less expense, and what is most important--the Polish spirit.

    They will find themselves among their own kind, and will draw their knowledge 5from a pure well, and the bright rays of Polish nationalism will dance about throughout this hospitable land.

    Who knows but what this Alliance college may in a few years turn into a university to which will flock young people from all the three sections of Poland, from all America! Who knows if perhaps in time this may not become the most important seat of learning of our nation! Who knows if perhaps in time people of great learning, geniuses may not issue from it, who will shine like bright stars in the firmament of our community.

    All of this is possible when one realizes that this has been undertaken by such a power, such a united mass of enlightened people, cognizant of the nation's welfare, as is united under the banner of the Polish National Alliance. Following this great step forward which the Alliance has taken, we will take other steps, and we sincerely hope that the dreams which we have mentioned above will come true.

    6

    Today it seems that nothing is impossible for the Alliance, which does not exceed its strength. And for a mass of eighty thousand people to maintain a college, and even a first class university, is certainly not a difficult task. Only we must all work together! We must work harmoniously and in unison! We must work with zeal and sacrifice for the good of the cause, and we will stride forward with youthful energy, accomplishing great things for the good of our immigrants and our country.

    People of the Alliance [the Polish National Alliance], rejoice! Rejoice because you have accomplished a great thing in a foreign land! The dream of the founders and the pioneers of ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, II D 5, III B 2, III G, III A, III H
  • Narod Polski -- October 22, 1913
    Something about Poles Living in Chicago

    In the last census of the city of Chicago the population of the city was two million three hundred eighty thousand five hundred.

    We can say that anything over two millions are Poles. Among Poles in Chicago half of them are from Poland and the other half are the first or second generation born in this country.

    Among Poles of the first and second generation there are many who do not understand the Polish language, they are ex-Poles, some of them never went to Polish parochial schools or they have forgotten how to speak Polish, having used it very seldom and they have taken not only the language but also the customs of a large American city.

    It is a very sad story but true, and it has happened very often. The Poles in Chicago generally live around the Polish churches. The parishes, schools and brotherly aid societies depend on the church and the parish indirectly, 2and directly depend upon large organizations.

    We have in Chicago about 750 societies. The Polish Roman-Catholic Union in Chicago represents 256 societies with 30,000 members of both sexes, brothers and sisters of the Union.

    There are 43 Polish parishes and churches of Roman-Catholics in Chicago.

    On the Northwest Side of the city there are 14 parishes close to each other, on the Southwest Side there are 12 parishes, in South Chicago there are 3 and in the suburbs there are 14 parishes.

    There are 20 parishes in Chicago, containing over one thousand families.

    The largest of the parishes and the oldest is St. Stanislaus Kostka; there are 4,000 families belonging to this church still.

    The smallest of the parishes is St. Mary of Gostyn in the suburb of East Grove with 50 families.

    3

    To the Polish parishes of the Roman-Catholic religion belong 50,000 active families, and about that many do not belong to any parish.

    For the service in those parishes there are over 100 clergymen of our nationality, and the bishop.

    In every one of these parishes we have a school. Over 30,000 children go to these Polish schools, where they are taught by 525 sisters.

    Beside the Roman-Catholic churches we have one Independent Catholic church located on Lubeck Street. This church was established about 18 years ago.

    We have three Polish cemeteries, the largest and oldest one is St. Adalbert on the Northwest Side of the city; Resurrection Cemetery, on the Southwest Side of the city; Holy Cross, on the Southeast Side in the suburd of West Hammond.

    We also have a Polish orphanage under the name of St. Hedwig, where about 400 children are being raised and educated, and three shelters for poor 4children; a home for the aged and an orphan's nursery is being built and will be completed soon.

    We have a Polish hospital, St, Mary of Nazareth, built according to the most modern hygienic demands, containing about 200 patients in each section, among them about 20 poor patients receiving every day medical advice and medicine free.

    We have in Chicago a few Polish high schools. The oldest one is St. Stanislaus College, where every year about 175 students are receiving an education. Then there is the Holy Trinity High School and the Academy of St. Nazareth, a boarding school for girls.

    We have four daily papers and seven weekly periodicals. The most popular daily is Dziennik Chicagoski (Polish Daily News), published for about 20 years; one of the weekly periodicals is our society's official organ, Narod Polski (Polish Nation).

    We have all kinds of institutions of social or national character, a few Polish 5banks and about 50 savings, and building loan associations, representing $5,000,000 Polish capital.

    We have Polish print shops and book shops, libraries, information offices, commission houses, warehouses and stores. We have many Poles who are successful in industry, trade, manufacturing and business.

    We have hundreds of people of different occupations; lawyers, physicians, publishers, professors, artists, political officials, etc.

    We have buildings where the administration offices of our four general Polish organizations are located, Polish Roman-Catholic Union, Polish Alma Mater, Polish National Alliance, and Polish Women's Alliance.

    So we have everything in Chicago, plenty of people, talents, power and general well-being. The one thing we do not have among us Poles is mutual understanding, unanimity of action in our socio-national work. The damage done by this deficiency in our character is enormous, incalcuable, irreparable.

    Rev. J. B. Obyrtacz

    In the last census of the city of Chicago the population of the city was two million three hundred eighty thousand five hundred. We can say that anything over two ...

    Polish
    III A, I A 2 b, III C, II D 1, II D 4, II D 5, II D 3, II B 2 f, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, II A 2, I D 1 b, II A 1, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- February 24, 1917
    New Polish Welfare Society

    At the end of last week a new society was added to the ranks of our useful welfare organizations. The new society will fill a need which has been felt for a long time. We are speaking of the Welfare Society of St. Joseph's Home for the Aged in Avondale, conducted and supported with great sacrifice by the Franciscan Sisters.

    To form this new outpost of our welfare work, our most hard-working women, practically all of those whose names we run across in every good cause, in every public service, have united. They met at the office of our Home for the Aged on North Hamlin Avenue, and in the presence of Reverend Joseph Tarasiuk, whom they invited to be the chaplain of their society, solemnly promised to support the work of the noble sisters in charge of this only Polish refuge for our aged, whom age and fate have cast at the mercy of human kindness.

    It was decided to post a list of the founders of the society and to invite 2as charter members all Polish women of good will, especially those living in Chicago and vicinity. The following women entered their names first on the list: Mary Neuman, Victoria Biedka, Louise Szwajkart, Anna Jozwiakowski, Valerie Gorski, Salome Jarka, Mary Kruszynski, Catherine Lakowka, Leocadia Kadow, Anna Switaj, Mary Wyzykowski, Anastasia Murkowski, Frances Czuj, Anastasia Wiedeman, Frances Lengowski, Helen Larkowski, W. Perlinski, Elizabeth Szczepanski, Anna Korzeniewski, Rosalie Skuner, Florence Kornatowski, Mary Osuch, Frances Masiak, Catherine Wasiewicz, Maryanne Dadey, Valentine Drufka, Maryanne Drufka, Anastasia Zalikowski, Elizabeth Zamorski, Frances Kunz, B. Hellmuth, Frances Klosowski, Harriet Turalski, and Clementine Dybala.

    By voluntary contributions a nice little sum was collected for the society's purposes. The following officers were elected: Mary Neuman, president; Louise Szwajkart, Anastasia Wiedeman, and Elizabeth Szczepanski, vice-presidents; Anna Switaj, recording secretary; Mary Kruszynski, financial secretary; Catherine Lakowka, treasurer. The following were elected 3organizers for specific districts: Elizabeth Zamorski (St. Mary of Angels); Valerie Gorski (Irving Park); Valentine Drufka and Frances Lengowski (Avondale); Frances Masiak (Cragin); Frances Czuj (St. John Cantius); Salome Jarka (St. Stanislaus Kostka); Rosalie Skuner and Mary Osuch (St. Hedwig); Catherine Wasiawicz (Five Holy Martyrs). As the society develops further, organizers will be delegated to other districts and parishes.

    For the purpose of obtaining the sponsorship of municipal and state officials, a committee composed of the following women was appointed: Leocadia Kadow, Anna Korzeniewski, Valerie Biedka, and Anna Jozwiakowski.

    The next meeting of the new society will be held on Tuesday, March 20, at 2 P. M., at St. Joseph's Home, 2649 North Hamlin Avenue.

    All Polish women willing to co-operate with this new welfare project are invited to become charter members. Further details can be obtained from 4any one of the above-mentioned women, the Franciscan Sisters, or the Chaplain Reverend Joseph Tarasiuk.

    At the end of last week a new society was added to the ranks of our useful welfare organizations. The new society will fill a need which has been felt ...

    Polish
    II D 5, III C, I K, IV