The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Zgoda -- April 30, 1890
    Society to Build a Hall for Pulaski

    The Builders Society is planning a picnic in Kuhn's Park, near Milwaukee Avenue May the 18th; tickets are 25¢ per couple.

    Thousands of Polish people living in the city of Chicago, have been aware of the need for this Polish hall, where our Polish people will be represented thus making a good impression on the people of other nationalities, but because of numerous obstacles this dream never came to reality.

    Last year Polish societies from the west section of our city, planned and finally organized a society called Pulaski Hall Society as a memorial to heroic deeds performed for this country, the United States of America.

    The funds collected to date are enough to cover the expense for this hall, that is why this picnic is being planned, to raise enough money to start work on this beautiful hall, and the committee is cordially inviting all Polish citizens to support this picnic by being present.

    We haven't any slackers among us. At last we can see this dream come to reality, which is what we have been waiting and working for.

    2

    Other nationalities have halls where they can gather in groups to enjoy themselves, why can't the Poles? That is why, my dear comrades, I ask you, forget your political party, and unite as one body, to work and support the building of this hall. We hope that the Poles will put their heart and soul into this work in the name of Society to build this Pulaski Hall.

    Committee

    The Builders Society is planning a picnic in Kuhn's Park, near Milwaukee Avenue May the 18th; tickets are 25¢ per couple. Thousands of Polish people living in the city of ...

    Polish
    II C, III A, II D 6
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 18, 1891
    A Chronicle of Poles in America A Memorial Book of 1891 One Hundred Years after the Proclamation of the Constitution of the Third of May 1871

    I am going to publish a Polish memorial book entitled "A Chronicle of Poles in America," (Kronika Polska w Ameryce) in honor of the memorable anniversary of the Constitution of May 3, 1871, and as a proof of our existence here in exile.

    This book will give an account of all Polish celebrations in America, a list of speeches and speakers, also a detailed description of all Polish settlements in America, with a list containing the names of the inhabitants and the name and location of the sections from which they come.

    Furthermore, this book will also show how many members there are in each family. In other words, it will give correct information of the number of 2Poles living in America at present.

    Each settlement will be mentioned separately, and a brief record of it will be shown. It will tell when and by whom the settlement was founded. It will also reveal the first Polish settlers who built the first church and school. It will give the name of the first pastor and his successors.

    I already have the most important material, and desire to have all available information as soon as possible.

    Every true and well-thinking Pole will admit that this book will be a permanent record of Polish activities,of the spiritual and material progress of the Poles on American soil, and at the same time, it is a public protest against the slanders of our enemies who deny our good qualities and our right to make a livelihood.

    It will be a permanent record, I repeat, for the voice of the newspapers 3will soon die out and be forgotten, but such a book will be handed down as an inheritance from parents to children, from generation to generation for many years, and will be sent to the libraries in Washington where it will last for centuries. Besides, this book will be a beginning and a foundation of the Polish history of Poles in exile after the partition of Poland.

    Finally, this book being of a larger size than a regular photographic album, printed on good paper, beautifully illustrated, and in durable binding, will be an ornament in your home.

    The clergy, editors of newspapers, presidents and secretaries of organizations, and all societies are asked to give their kind co-operation and support to this publication in their vicinities. They are asked to send in data of their neighborhood, or to recommend a worthy citizen, a good writer, who would undertake this work. Kindly have him communicate with 4me, and I will be glad to give further instructions.

    The sooner I receive the particulars, the quicker the work will be finished.

    In conclusion, I wish to inform the public that in order to prevent any one from reprinting the book, or a possible competition, I have registered it in the proper office of the United States, a country so favorable toward the Poles. I also wish to announce that the book will be published by subscriptions, either cash or in four convenient payments, for which special canvassers will be engaged.

    Further details will be announced later. At present, I am waiting for the result of my appeal.

    Respectfully yours,

    I. Wendzinski

    488 Mitchell Street,

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Aug. 1, 1891.

    I am going to publish a Polish memorial book entitled "A Chronicle of Poles in America," (Kronika Polska w Ameryce) in honor of the memorable anniversary of the Constitution of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, II B 2 c, II C, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 06, 1892
    Kosciuszko Monument Association Incorporated under State Laws

    Yesterday, the Secretary of State issued a charter of incorporation to the Kosciuszko Monument Association, which has as its aim the erection of a memorial statue to the great Polish and American hero, Thaddeus Kosciuszko. The following are the founders and directors of this corporation:

    Max A. Drezmal

    W. Smulski

    M. A. LaBuy

    Leon Szopinski

    Casimir Midowicz

    E. Z. Brodowski

    Paul O. Stensland

    Michael Majewski

    and John F. Smulski.

    2

    For the present time, John F. Smulski will be retained as secretary. Mr. Smulski stated to the American press that "this organization has been trying for four years to get permission from the park board to exhibit the statue at one of the better sites in Humboldt Park. This has finally been granted. We propose to collect $25,000 for this memorial through subscriptions, and by giving special programs. We are going to make an effort to have this statue exhibited at the Columbian Exposition," he concluded.

    The editors of the Dziennik Chicagoski, wish this organization all the success in the world, however, they are doubtful of its materialization in time for the Fair, because there is so little time.

    Yesterday, the Secretary of State issued a charter of incorporation to the Kosciuszko Monument Association, which has as its aim the erection of a memorial statue to the great Polish ...

    Polish
    II C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 17, 1892
    The Kosciuszko Monument Association (Editorial)

    Brotherly help, the preservation of native traditions, the everyday use of their mother tongue, and the elevation of their people to a parity in world affairs are unquestionably the highest ideals of any nationality group and of any patriotic person.

    The recognition of those men who have done outstanding work in their respective fields follows in the footsteps of tradition. Accomplishments of benefit to mankind, such as those in religion, militarism, medicine, and literature, should be remembered. Those who worked for the betterment of mankind should be treated with the greatest respect. They deserve to be immortalized because by so doing the result of their efforts will continue to be alive before the eyes of the people. Those who have regard for their own people and their freedom, will not only worship these great men, but will also try to emulate them. They will not only preserve the memory of 2the great, but also spread their good will [toward them] to others, thereby helping to bring men closer together.

    The outstanding events of history are the deeds of noble persons who have sacrificed their lives for their people and humanity. It is these deeds that awaken in the individual the desire to do great things. No project, no matter how large its capital or how great its benefit to mankind, can compare with a great man. It is true that capital draws interest and some projects are beneficial, but all this is not as important as the moral lesson the people get from the example of the great. Their work, even after death, remains immortal in the minds of posterity. The striving of the people to better the mental horizons of mankind spreads through and grows richer with the ages. The elevation of a nation from the quagmire of life to the field of action and recognition, is also a feat of inestimable value to its people. The instilling of hope, knowledge, and patriotism, coupled with the enrichment of tradition, tends to bring to the forefront not only the people, but also the country. The greater the 3accomplishments in this direction, the richer the people become in spiritual, moral and patriotic values. All this helps to promote a better living standard, a better outlook on life, and a desire to do creative work. Each individual effort, each individual accomplishment, is another stone to the pillar of national fame. The quality of material used in building this tower reflects the accomplishments of a people. It shows how the people live and think, what they want, and how they expect to get it.

    Among the men recorded in our history, we find those who have done a great deal helping to promote patriotism by offering their lives to free the people and their country. Through their efforts, the people were brought closer together and helped to improve living conditions. Polish great men have shown their people that a son of Poland is as fit to take part in the affairs of the world as the son of any other nationality.

    Thaddeus Kosciuszko was such a great man. He has not only become a brilliant figure in his native country, but also abroad. Through his military endeavors, he has won the hearts of his people and of others.

    4

    As the years pass, his noble and heroic endeavors become more famous and his desire to create a democracy for his country becomes stronger than ever. In the hearts of our younger generation, his memory is becoming more respected each day. Who among us does not want to see the realization of his dreams? Who does not care to see our people free again and on equal standing with others? Who does not want to see the defeat of despotism? The answer to these questions is gaining momentum every hour.

    The oppressed are not able to stand any longer the barbaric [treatment to which they are being subjected] and have left their shackles behind to search for a more pleasant place in which to live. Most of them went far beyond the borders of their country, across the vast expanse of the ocean, to seek a better livelihood. Many sought the protective shores of America, made free by George Washington. It was here that Washington and Kosciuszko fought hand in hand to make America what it is today. Kosciuszko's heart must have foreseen that his participation in helping a country free itself 5 6would someday benefit his own people. His accomplishments have actually helped Poland and her people to be regarded as great lovers of freedom.

    It is here that most of our people have emigrated. At the present time, there are over half a million Poles in the United States. Most of them, if not all, ought to take part in a cause [the object of which is] to perpetuate the name of a native son [of Poland]. They ought to show Kosciuszko their kindness, just as Kosciuszko showed his for them.

    Since the dawn of civilization, man has always built memorials for his outstanding sons. Why should we not follow this age-old example?

    We can show to other nationality groups how much we love and respect the memory of the man who, in addition to defending his own native country, was instrumental [to the success of] the American forces. Let us erect him a monument, but let us all share in its cost. Let every Pole, regardless of social standing, do his part by signing his name to the document in which are listed the names of those wishing to pay homage to the Polish hero.

    7

    One can do its part by taking part in a wholesale demonstration, by making a cash contribution, and by signing his or her name on the proposal. In this manner we will build a pedestal for posterity. To the world at large, it will show that we all love, honor, and desire liberty just as much as the great leaders. We can also show that we can progress as a solid group; that we know how to stand for our rights and how to voice our opinion in protest against any violence; and that there is a great number here ready to defend the right of religious expression and liberty.

    The Kosciuszko Monument Association embodies all these principles and tries to build a monument in honor of Kosciuszko in one of the parks of Chicago. The board of directors urges all Polish societies, clubs, and groups to take part in this honorable cause. All liberty-loving individuals can play an important role by giving [this movement] their wholehearted support. If all of us take part in this movement, we can make it a reality in a short while.

    8

    Paul O. Stensland, a prominent banker of Chicago and a director of the Columbian Exposition, has furnished a twenty-thousand-dollar bond for the association. Mr. Stensland is a member of the association's board of directors.

    All contributions are welcome. Send them to Mr. Szopinski's office, 559 Noble street, Chicago.

    Meetings are held every week, and the progress of this organization will be periodically announced to the public.

    The following are members of the board of directors: E. Z. Brodowski, Michael Majewski, Wladyslaw Smulski, John F. Smulski, Dr. Casimir Midowicz, Michael La Buy, Paul O. Stensland, Max Dzemala, and Leon Szopinski.

    Brotherly help, the preservation of native traditions, the everyday use of their mother tongue, and the elevation of their people to a parity in world affairs are unquestionably the highest ...

    Polish
    II C, III B 2, III A, I J, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 20, 1892
    Donations for Kosciuszko Monument Begin to Flow

    Since the incorporation of the Kosciuszko Monument Association early this month, contributions have been slowly coming to the office of the secretary, Leon Szopinski, 559 Noble Street. Paul O. Stensland, director of the organization, was the largest contributor. His fifty dollars swelled the donation of twenty-four other persons to $225.55.

    Since the incorporation of the Kosciuszko Monument Association early this month, contributions have been slowly coming to the office of the secretary, Leon Szopinski, 559 Noble Street. Paul O. Stensland, ...

    Polish
    II C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- February 22, 1892
    The Poles a Survey of Chicago's Polish Population

    The Poles, as a part of Chicago's population, belong to those nationalities which are especially outstanding, like the Bohemians, Danes, Swedes etc. The Polish population of our city numbers not less than 60,000. A peculiar characteristic of this nation is their tenacity in sticking together in their different colonies. They live in seclusion as a people, more than any other Europeans, and one feels like a stranger passing through their colonies.

    The most extensive Polish settlement is located in the Sixteenth Ward, Noble Street, Elston Avenue etc. In this neighborhood live not less than 30,000 Poles. Almost as large is the Polish colony on Seventeenth Street, Paulina, Laurel and vicinity. The chief factor of their seclusion is the Catholic Church. The largest congregation is the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, located at Ingraham and Noble Streets.

    The Polish immigration to Chicago started thirty-eight years ago. Anton Schermann, J. Niemezewski, J. Dziewior, who are still alive, and are honored like patriarchs, were among the first settlers....

    2

    The immigrants of those early years were almost exclusively poor working men; but nearly all of them became well-to-do. The colony grew very slowly until 1873, when large numbers of Poles from Russia and Prussia came to Chicago. At that time the colonies on the south side and in South Chicago were founded. When in 1884 twenty-thousand Poles were banished from their old country, the largest portion came to America, and of these the majority settled in Chicago. The largest Polish population of American cities is in Chicago.

    The Poles have eight churches in Chicago, and the largest among them is the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, which has thirty thousand members. The church, the school, the home for the nuns and the priests cover a whole city square. The school is a four story brick building and more than three thousand pupils attend. Eight men teachers and twenty nuns comprise the staff.....Two high schools were also erected by the church recently...and an orphanage.

    The two largest associations of the Polish population are the Polish Roman-Catholic National Union and the Polish National Alliance. The interests and activities of these organizations are closely allied to eccleciastical and national purposes. They have branches all over the United States and are also 3active in works of charity. P. Kiolbassa is the president of the Union, and its office of administration is at 141 - 143 West Division Street. This building belongs to the Polish Publishing Company.

    The above mentioned company publishes two Polish newspapers, Dziennik Chicagoski, a daily, and the Wiarai Ojczyzna (Faith and Fatherland), a weekly, and is the organ of the Polish Roman-Catholic National Union, which has a membership of about 8,000. The National Alliance was organized twelve years ago. It has 4,500 members, and their slogan is; "Poland is not yet lost."

    Besides the already mentioned papers, others are published: the Gazeta Polska, established 1873, the weekly Tygodnik Powiesciowy, the Gazeta Katolicka and the Dzien Swiety.

    At present there is a movement on foot among the Poles to erect a monument in Humboldt Park to that great Polish champion of liberty, Kosciusko. The Chopin Choir and the dramatic Club of young people contribute to their entertainment.

    4

    They also have two athletic clubs, and a number of small societies which are active in charitable endeavors under the supervision of the clergy.

    The Poles, as a part of Chicago's population, belong to those nationalities which are especially outstanding, like the Bohemians, Danes, Swedes etc. The Polish population of our city numbers not ...

    Polish
    III A, III C, III G, IV, II D 4, III B 2, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, II C, II D 10, II B 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 01, 1892
    Kosciuszko Monument Association

    Members of the Kosciuszko Monument Association have adopted a resolution to send out an appeal to all Polish newspapers, societies, organizations, and groups, including business men and corporations, asking them to support the Association. Polish groups abroad will also be contacted.

    In every letter, a questionnaire and a self-addressed envelope will be included. The list of names is now almost complete, and by the end of this week the letters will be in the mail.

    In addition to its mail campaign, the Association is organizing a group of house-to-house solicitors. This has been done in order to intensify the campaign and at the same time get new members, since every member 2of the group must belong to the Association. At present we need five new members for the Revision Commission. Candidates for this commission cannot qualify unless they are well known in Chicago.

    In order to increase the funds of the organization, the directors are planning to publish a memorial book, in which all prominent Poles will be listed, The book will also contain short biographies of artists, poets, musicians, heroes, and men of letters, as well as a historical sketch of Polish tradition and aphorisms. It will be illustrated with many pictures and artistic sketches. The Poles of America and Europe will be represented in this book, a reason why many prominent Poles are enthusiastic about it.

    "We hope that every Pole will support this cause and do his best to make 3the ideals of this organization possible," stated Dr. Casimir Midowicz, secretary of the Kosciuszko Monument Association.

    According to the secretary's report, forty nine persons have already contributed $132.91. Peter Kiolbassa, city treasurer, and Walter Nowaczewski contributed twenty five dollars each.

    Members of the Kosciuszko Monument Association have adopted a resolution to send out an appeal to all Polish newspapers, societies, organizations, and groups, including business men and corporations, asking them ...

    Polish
    II C, II B 2 d 3, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 08, 1892
    Donations for Kosciuszko Monument Continue to Pour In

    Sixty-nine persons have contributed a total of $62.95 towards the erection of the Kosciuszko monument. This brought the grand total to $421.41. One hundred and forty four persons have made this total possible.

    Thirty members of the Polish Carpenters and Cabinet-makers swelled the funds by contributing one dollar each after a joint resolution was passed at the quarterly meeting held March 3. Donations from out of the State have also been received.

    Contributions, no matter how small, are always welcome.

    Sixty-nine persons have contributed a total of $62.95 towards the erection of the Kosciuszko monument. This brought the grand total to $421.41. One hundred and forty four persons have made ...

    Polish
    II C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 15, 1892
    Kosciusko Monument Fund (Summary of Report by Secretary Leon Szopinski)

    The Kosciusko Monument Fund movement is spreading throughout the United States and Canada. Statistics from the secretary's office reveal that 232 people have made contributions totaling $523.96. Only recently, eighty-five donors gave $102.55. A five-dollar offering came from Canada. Forty-seven members of the Thomas Zana Society gave a total of $47. The Polish Harmonia Society of New York gave $5.

    Three persons from Galicia gave eighty-five cents. One person from Vienna gave fifty cents. These donations give definite proof that the movement has spread to Europe.

    The following letter came to the monument headquarters from Mr. Terski, secretary of the Polish Sons Society, of Detroit, dated March 4, 1892:

    2

    "To the Honorable Committee of the Kosciusko Monument Association: I wish to enclose the following reaction to your recent letter asking support for your Fund. When the letter was read,at our regular monthly meeting on March 2, the members all began to applaud. A motion to support the Fund was unanimously accepted. A committee of five was then chosen to lay plans for securing contributions in our area.

    "The Polish Sons Society heartily wishes the Association success in its endeavor to build a statue to our patriot, Thaddeus Kosciusko.

    "Fraternally yours,

    "L. Terski, secretary,

    "Polish Sons Society,

    "Branch 28,

    Polish National Alliance."

    3

    St. Joseph's Society of St. Stanislaus Kostka parish has donated the sum of $50. Reports have been received that 230 members of the Kosciusko Society of Chicago have agreed to contribute a dollar each.....

    Favorable reports have been received from other societies in the Chicago area.

    The Kosciusko Monument Fund movement is spreading throughout the United States and Canada. Statistics from the secretary's office reveal that 232 people have made contributions totaling $523.96. Only recently, eighty-five ...

    Polish
    II C, III H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 30, 1892
    The Kosciusko Monument Project

    The following persons have agreed to become members of the office of the controller of the Kosciusko Monument Fund.

    1. Father Vincent Barzynski, pastor of St. Stanislaus Kostka parish;

    2. Peter Kiolbassa, City Treasurer;

    3. Theodor Wikaryasz;

    4. Anthony Sowinski;

    5. Mr. Potanski, lumber dealer.

    2

    The first three named officers have full charge of all the financial transactions. The duties of the latter two have not been decided. It is believed that for the present they will take care of the publicity work.

    All the members will be placed under bond of two thousand dollars each, with the exception of the cashier who will carry a $20,000 bond.

    The following persons have agreed to become members of the office of the controller of the Kosciusko Monument Fund. 1. Father Vincent Barzynski, pastor of St. Stanislaus Kostka parish; 2. ...

    Polish
    II C, IV