The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 26, 1892
    The Polish Printers Association (Poles in Chicago)

    As a result of the statement printed in our Chicago publications during the past week, an imposing number of Polish printers and compositors gathered at the office of Dziennik Chicagoski for the purpose of forming an association that would be adequate to their needs. The meeting was opened by Mr. Migdalski, who was also elected president at this meeting, and the undersigned was elected secretary.

    The entire meeting had the character of a personal chat, revealing mutual understanding, and a desire to build a firm foundation undor this new type of association in America. This worthy aim was achieved. All the delegates declared that an association of printers and compositors was necessary and good.

    At this meeting it was decided to organize also an association for the purpose of teaching the printer's art, and of sponsoring programs and lectures in all the ramifications of historical knowledge; further it was decided to try to bring about an improvement in the living standards of the members by seeking employment 2for them, and giving them assistance in sickness and death. It was decided to charge one dollar as the initiation fee, and monthly dues of twenty-five cents. The other motions pertaining to sick and death benefits will depend upon the decision of all when the constitution has been formulated and accepted.

    After further discussion it was decided that our new association should take an active part in all matters essential to our Polish immigration, but it will be self-sustaining and independent and will not become combined with any Polish or American organization.

    At this meeting twenty-six members enrolled. The following members were chosen to formulate the constitution: Messrs. Migdalski, Olbinski, Zagorski, Sosnowski, Gorecki, Zloczewski, and Majchrzycki.

    The next meeting will be held at the same place, on Sunday, August 7, 1892, at two-thirty in the afternoon, to which we invite all colleagues.

    J. Olbinski, Secretary.

    As a result of the statement printed in our Chicago publications during the past week, an imposing number of Polish printers and compositors gathered at the office of Dziennik Chicagoski ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 2, II B 2 f, II D 1, II A 2, I A 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 03, 1892
    Evening School

    Enrollment for evening classes at St. Stanislaus Kostka School will be officially opened this evening. Those desiring to take advantage of these classes are requested to come between 7 and 8 P. M.

    A list of the subjects offered at this school will be published in a later issue.

    Enrollment for evening classes at St. Stanislaus Kostka School will be officially opened this evening. Those desiring to take advantage of these classes are requested to come between 7 and ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 06, 1892
    New Polish Democratic Headquarters in the Sixteenth Ward

    New Polish Democratic headquarters have been opened at 587 Milwaukee Avenue for the convenience of those residing in the Sixteenth Ward. Democrats can meet here freely. Naturalization classes are open to all those desiring to become citizens. Those wishing to take advantage at this service should call any day at 12:30 P. M. and every evening, except Monday, at 7 P. M. Citizenship papers may be obtained free of charge. The Polish Democratic organization also pays for the transportation of the applicant and witness, and the latter's fee, if any. There is no charge for any of these services.

    The office is open daily from 9 A. M. to 10 P. M. During these hours questions of all kinds will be answered.

    Naturalization Committee, 587 Milwaukee Avenue.

    Joseph S. Geshkewich.

    Louis Roland.

    2

    These Democratic headquarters were opened for the convenience of the citizens of the Sixteenth Ward by the president of the Sixteenth Ward Polish Democratic Club. All expenses were borne by him.

    The president of the Club is Peter Kiolbassa, city treasurer. Credit is due him for this generous contribution to the Polish people. He also arranged to have the office and hall decorated with American flags; a large banner with the name of the organization has been placed in a conspicuous place on the outside of the building.

    Mr. Kiolbassa is leaving today for San Antonio, Texas, where he will stay eight days. The vice-president, Mr. Buxbaum, will take charge of the duties of the Club during his superior's absence.

    New Polish Democratic headquarters have been opened at 587 Milwaukee Avenue for the convenience of those residing in the Sixteenth Ward. Democrats can meet here freely. Naturalization classes are open ...

    Polish
    I F 2, II B 2 f, I F 5, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 06, 1892
    Over Five Hundred Poles Naturalized During First Part of October

    Over five hundred Poles were naturalized in Chicago during the first few days of October. This is a marked increase over the previous months of this year. All those who have not as yet obtained their citizenship papers should take advantage of the opportunities afforded by many of the Polish naturalization classes.

    Over five hundred Poles were naturalized in Chicago during the first few days of October. This is a marked increase over the previous months of this year. All those who ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 10, 1892
    Evening School Opened at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish

    The evening school at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, Noble and Bradley Streets, has been opened recently. There are several divisions of classes.

    There are preparatory classes for boys who are to receive their first Holy Communion. Besides getting religious training, the boys may also join the Polish language and arithmetic classes.

    Classes in the English language are given separately. Children and adults are eligible for these classes. The beginners are instructed by a Polish teacher, in order that persons who speak only Polish may grasp the subject better. The advanced course in English is given by an English instructor.

    The German language is taught by a Polish teacher who has had years of training in this field with the German government, where he had to conduct all affairs in the German tongue.

    2

    An effort has always been made to get the best qualified instructors; in this way the students get better training.

    Enrollment for high school classes will begin this evening. All those qualified to enter are urged to take advantage of these evening classes. Classes in Polish literature and history are one of the many features. English subjects will also be given. In these classes the Polish youth may get training in public speaking, dramatics, literature, etc.

    Further information may be obtained by calling in person at the offices of the school between 7 and 8 P. M.

    The evening school at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, Noble and Bradley Streets, has been opened recently. There are several divisions of classes. There are preparatory classes for boys who are ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, I A 2 a, I A 2 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 13, 1892
    The Sunday and Evening Classes of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish School

    In the evening classes of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish School the boys study catechism, arithmetic, and Polish, Separate classes in English, Polish, and German are held for adults and children. Many adults attend.

    Polish history and literature are taught in the higher grades.

    About two hundred boys attend the four classes that are held every Sunday. Instruction is given in catechism, arithmetic, history, and singing.

    Every father should see to it that his sons attend classes; he should question them about what they are studying.

    Parents should co-operate with the school in the care of their children, for the greatest obligation of the parents is to rear their children as righteous 2Catholic citizens and, above all, as Poles.

    At present there are day, evening, and Sunday classes. Every boy, young or old, should attend one of them. Are parents concerned about this? If not, that is their affair. They will have to give an account of this before God.

    In the evening classes of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish School the boys study catechism, arithmetic, and Polish, Separate classes in English, Polish, and German are held for adults and ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, I B 3 b, I A 3, III A, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 14, 1892
    Polish Citizens Active in South Chicago Politics

    The Daily Calumet, published un South Chicago, writes as follows: "Democrats of the Thirty-third Ward acknowledge the fact that the Poles were largely responsible for the Democratic victory in this ward. Many Poles who have received their citizenship papers in recent years are taking an active interest in politics.

    John Koziczynski, who has devoted a large part of this spare time and money to help others to become citizens, has been conducting citizenship classes among the Polish people for quite some time, and hundreds of Poles have obtained their citizenship papers as a result of his efforts.

    Last Sunday, Mr. Koziczynski succeeded in arranging two Polish mass meetings, despite the fact that the Republicans tried to have the meetings blocked. In writing about the outstanding political leaders of the Thirty-third Ward, 2we omitted his name by mistake. Because of this, we have devoted this section to him, for he deserves the right to be considered as one of the individuals responsible for the Democratic victory in this ward.

    The Daily Calumet, published un South Chicago, writes as follows: "Democrats of the Thirty-third Ward acknowledge the fact that the Poles were largely responsible for the Democratic victory in this ...

    Polish
    I F 1, II B 2 f, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 14, 1892
    St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Evening School Classes Increased

    The evening school of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish is steadily growing. There are six classes at present, requiring the services of six teachers. Two of these classes are especially devoted to instruction in English; one deals with the rudiments of English, while the other is more advanced. Three classes offer instructions to boys and young men who are to receive their first Holy Communion; the Polish language and arithmetic are also taught. There are also two classes for young men which offer instructions in confirmation, Polish history and literature, mathematics, etc.

    The school offers great advantages to Polish youths, especially to those who must earn a living during the day. Those young men who have spare time during the evening should not pass up this opportunity.

    [Translator's note: The article says that there are six classes and mentions seven. Probably one of them was divided into two groups.]

    The evening school of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish is steadily growing. There are six classes at present, requiring the services of six teachers. Two of these classes are especially devoted ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 12, 1893
    The Results of Doctor Dunikowski's Mission to America (Editorial)

    The Catholic Gazette brings us the following results of Dr. Dunikowski's visit to America as given in a letter from Lwow:

    "Delegates to the Assembly and the National Council met on December 21. Dr. Dunikowski, a member of this group, had at its request visited America and studied Polish-American conditions.....The group listened with interest to Dr. Dunikowski's report, after which followed a general discussion. While the final decision rests with the Galician Assembly, here are some of the projects outlined:

    "1. In the near future, a secondary or high school will be established in Chicago with the purpose of developing a patriotic and Catholic spirit 2in candidates for the priesthood. These candidates will receive a sound education intended to prepare them for entrance to a theological seminary. Count Rey told the gathering that he had already a million and a half francs to use for this purpose.

    "2. The establishment of an organization to maintain connections between Poland and the Polish Roman Catholic Union, the Polish National Alliance, and all other Polish organizations. The object of this organization is simply to keep up the Polish national spirit in America and to raise, if possible, the intellectual level [of the Poles].

    "3. Polish libraries and reading rooms in America are to be supplied with books.

    "4. A Polish Insurance Association and a Polish Bank are to be established in America.

    3

    "5. A system of national colonization, designed to discourage concentration of immigrants in large cities, as such concentration produces a proletariat.

    "6. An appeal will be sent to Rome requesting greater attention to the needs of the Polish Church--especially the appointment of at least one Polish bishop in America."

    Doubtless, these are very interesting and noble projects. One point is objectionable, however, namely, that our brethren across the ocean propose without consulting us, things which can be accomplished only upon an understanding with American Polonia, and with its cooperation and support. It may be that we are mistaken--that this impression is the result of too hurried a letter bringing the news to the editorial office. At any rate, it is logical that nothing concerning us can be definitely achieved without us.

    The Catholic Gazette brings us the following results of Dr. Dunikowski's visit to America as given in a letter from Lwow: "Delegates to the Assembly and the National Council met ...

    Polish
    III H, III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 2 a, III C, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 21, 1893
    Polish Artist Presents Interesting Plan

    Mieczyslaw Niedzwiedzinski, one of the representatives of the Polish artists whose paintings are on exhibit at the World's Fair, has communicated a very interesting plan [to Dziennik Chicagoski]. The plan provides for the lottery of about twenty of the Polish paintings now on exhibit, from which a portion of the profits is to be used here for public and charitable purposes.

    M. Niedzwiedzinski proposes the sale of a hundred and twenty thousand tickets at one dollar each (or 60,000 at $2), with the prize to be one of the original Polish paintings, to be purchased for this purpose. In addition, each ticket will entitle the holder to a photographic reproduction of one of the paintings.

    The originator of the plan proposes the following paintings for lottery:

    2

    "The Itinerant Merchant" and "Mauretania," by Alchimowicz; "The Convalescent," by Gazycowa; "Meditation" and "Darling," by Dukszynska; W. Gerson's "Queen Hedwig," "Christening of Lithuania," and "King Sigmund"; Jasinski's "Holiday Services"; "Kedzierski's "Little Church" and "Return from the City"; Malczewski's "Death of a Siberian Exile"; Matejko's "Wernyhora"; Mirecki's "Unconsoled"; Modenstein's "Under Christian Care"; Pawlowski's "Harvest in Poland"; Piechowski's "Christ on the Cross"; Popiel's "After the Storm"; Styka's "Queen of Poland"; and Zmurko's "Lady in Furs" and "Evening Song".

    Mr. Niedzwiedzinski would dispose of $15,000 of the money collected in the following manner:

    (1) $2,000 for the Kosciusko Monument Fund; (2) $10,000 for the foundation of a Polish trade school in Chicago; (3) $2,000 for the foundation of a newspaper to champion the Polish cause, written in the English language; and (4) $1,000 for the support of the Polish Immigrants' House.

    3

    The rest of the money would be spent as follows: For purchasing the paintings, $58,148; for customs duties, $58,722; for 120,000 photographic reproductions, $18,000; for commission to the agents handling the sale of tickets and for incidental expenses, $18,000.

    Mr. Niedzwiedzinski proposes that all arrangements for the lottery be made by a committee of local citizens in conjunction with the artists' representatives. For this committee, he suggests the Reverends C. Sztuczko, V. Barzynski, and J. Radziejewski; also W. Bardonski, E. Z. Brodowski, K. Butkiewicz, Count Chlapowski (New York), Judge [M. A.] LaBuy, F. S. Satalecki (Detroit), S. Slominski, Dr. C. Midowicz, F. Smietanka, J. F. Smulski, L. Szopinski, and others.

    Mr. Niedzwiedzinski counts not only upon Poles to buy the tickets, but upon Americans also. He bases the possibility of the project's success upon the fact that it will serve a public purpose. He said that the representatives of the Polish artists had already been approached by New York agents with a proposition of this sort.

    Here we have given Mr. Niedzwiedski's project, just as it was presented to us. Our own comments on this matter we reserve for a later issue.

    Mieczyslaw Niedzwiedzinski, one of the representatives of the Polish artists whose paintings are on exhibit at the World's Fair, has communicated a very interesting plan [to Dziennik Chicagoski]. The plan ...

    Polish
    II A 3 c, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 f, III G, III H, II C, IV