The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 28, 1891
    Our Amateurish Thearicals

    (From the editors: This communication is published as we received it. However, we like to express our frank opinion by stating that we do not agree with the writer in some particulars. Other readers are invited to write on this subject).

    We must admit that the Polish theatrical movement in our city is very strong, and it is not surprising, because there are hundreds of Poles in Chicago who could give a few scores of amateur plays every year, and each one would draw a large audience.

    Whether these theatricals are of benefit to the public, either by furnishing them recreation, or by uplifting them morally, is a question.

    Very seldom, is there a theatrical performance given without some kind of additional entertainment, such as dancing, drinking etc., and if it 2so happens that such a performance is held without any supplementing feature, the hall is empty. Do you wish to know why?

    For this natural reason we find that a theatrical play alone, performed in the manner as practiced up until now, does not give complete satisfaction. It is true that the most capable persons are selected for this task. It is true that these persons devote much of their time to these plays, frequent rehearsals with great patience, and quite often, after a day of hard work. Yet they do not act well enough to interest the public, because they either do not know their parts well, or cannot be heard. Finally, it appears that they do not understand their roles. At times, they cause laughter at the most tragic moments, and on the other hand, they fail to produce the proper effect at comical scenes. We do not intend to criticize our amateurs unduly, for they endeavor to play their roles as best they can. We should be grateful to them for their gratuitous sacrifice. It is not their fault that they do not play better.

    3

    It is our opinion that a city as large as Chicago ought to have a first-class Polish theater with a personnel capable of giving a performance that would not discredit us in the eyes of the Americans, a performance that would attract the public without any additional entertainments, such as balls or drinking. So far, we have not been able to accomplish this.

    The most important factor needed in our own theatrical work is a suitable hall. As we did not have such hall until now, it was impossible for us to conduct theatrical plays. Fortunately, such a hall is under construction now, and it will be ready for use in a short time. Then we should think of organizing a dramatic club.

    Above all, we need a dramatic club, which would sponsor theatrical plays regularly at specified times.

    It is impossible for such a club to have professional actors. Persons who 4are not young any more, and who work hard, cannot be made good actors. It will be a great accomplishment if they learn their roles well. Such a club can be formed under the direction of our old patriotic organization, Krolowa Korony Polskiej, (Queen of Polish Crown). We are certain that this matter will be taken up at its next meeting.

    Such a club would develop theatrical skill, and supply actors. However, it takes a long time to train a person to become a first class actor.

    In our opinion, it would be best to establish a dramatic school. Such a school ought to be established and maintained by the people of our parish. We are offering some good suggestions: The school should have a limited number of young students of both sexes, whose ages should not exceed fourteen years for the girls, and eighteen years for the boys. The students should possess such innate abilities and qualifications as: well formed bodies, a good knowledge of reading and writing Polish, and especially good vocal organs, adaptable for singing. The moral conduct of pupils should be under a strict control, and the smallest offense 5against morality should be punished by a dismissal from the school.

    The instructions would be given only once a week, on Sundays from 9 to 12 A. M., because we have experienced that evening study does not bring good results. During the first year, the students would be taught, above all, how to speak Polish correctly, how to read and recite poems, prosaic compositions and singing; besides this, the school would give a few easy plays.

    Such a school does not need any endowment, because the students would defray the expenses themselves by giving theatrical plays from time to time, and our citizens would surely support it by such large attendance that the hall could not accommodate them.

    After a few years of hard work, we would probably be able to see a successful, first class, Polish drama, perhaps "Halka," by Moniuszko, which would satisfy the public in every respect.

    (From the editors: This communication is published as we received it. However, we like to express our frank opinion by stating that we do not agree with the writer in ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 f, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 24, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    With a view to increasing the field of activity of its Educational Department, the Polish Patriotic Organization will hold a meeting on Feb. 25, 7:30 P.M., at Saint Stanislaus's school hall.

    All clergy, officers of church societies, teachers, organists, editors of newspapers and choir singers, as well as all citizens interested in the Polish Educational Department,are invited.

    With a view to increasing the field of activity of its Educational Department, the Polish Patriotic Organization will hold a meeting on Feb. 25, 7:30 P.M., at Saint Stanislaus's school ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 f
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 05, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago Polish Patriotic Organization Holds Important Meeting

    The Educational Department of the Polish Patriotic Organization of St. Stanislaus Parish held a meeting at St. Stanislaus Hall last night.

    At this meeting the aims of this society were discussed. The principal aim is to spread a general campaign of education in the form of Polish patriotic literature, Polish music, both church and national, among the Polish people. It is also proposed to develop the artistic talents of our people, that they may become able representatives of dramatic art, especially national. Generally speaking, the purpose of the organization is to educate the Polish youth.

    We know that the beginning is very hard, for it is the custom of the Poles only to look at one another everytime anything not immediately practical is proposed.

    One of our difficulties in America is that many of us who lack the necessary qualifications for a given job refuse to improve ourselves by hard study.

    2

    We have no courage to acknowledge it, and even refuse to believe that this deficiency can be overcome.

    The Educational Department desires to do away with this deficiency by conducting special conferences in which the youth may get together and discuss different subjects.

    If the members of the Department will work steadily, efficiently, and systematically, there can be no doubt that the result of their labors will be evident in a short time. Not the one who only plans, but the one who plans and executes accurately is the one to conquer difficulties large and small. Cooperative work always brings its fruit.

    Let us act, brother patriots! Mutual confidence, understanding, orderly meetings and patient performance of our obligations will make us benefactors of the Polish youth.

    Your deeds will be written in gold letters in the book, of life and in the hearts of those for whom you will open treasures of knowledge, treasures 3of beauty; for whom you will open temples of universal and national wisdom.

    Those who doubt should retreat; let them be silent; they should not discourage others.

    The one who discourages others takes a great responsibility upon himself before God and country.

    There are people who criticize everything no matter how good it is, and who are glad if they succeed in spoiling the work of others.

    Such satisfaction is disastrous and will be punished by God, let alone that quite often the people discover such foxes.

    The harder the beginning the more courage, understanding and cooperation we need. Constructive criticism is useful too if given at the right time.

    The Educational Department of the Polish Patriotic Organization of St. Stanislaus Parish held a meeting at St. Stanislaus Hall last night. At this meeting the aims of this society were ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 f, II B 2 g, I A 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 01, 1891
    Polish Dramatic Club At St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish

    Judging by its present activities, the newly organized Polish Dramatic Club of the Polish Patriotic Society at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish, will have a greater importance than it seemed at first. we cannot refrain today from expressing our approval of the Club, especially of its management, because we wish to encourage its members to further their work and at the same time urge other settlements and parishes to organize such clubs.

    Staging of theatrical plays is not the only object of the Club. It is rather a school for its members where they are taught not only how to be a good amateur actor, but also other subjects which give them a general education.

    Many dramatic clubs made blunders because its members considered themselves great artists, and were interested in dramatics only now and then. Occasionally, they selected a new play, selected parts, studied them, and staged a 2play. They demanded severe criticism by the newspapers, and if there were any criticisms, even though not severe, they were greatly offended, and threatened to boycott the newspaper.

    Many members of this new Club are well acquainted with the theater because they were affiliated with other dramatic clubs and were considered very good amateurs. This proves that we should enlighten one another.

    The Club has a very ingenious system for realizing its aim. Quite often, perhaps every week, the Club conducts evening gatherings, at which various performances are given, either by individual members or by groups. The program consists of recitations, singing, monologues, monodramas or short comedies. The program also includes an educational lecture, or a very interesting talk on a serious subject. Finally, the Club holds conferences for the benefit of the Club.

    This is a very practical solution of the question of the Dramatic School which 3was taken up by us a few weeks ago. At present, it is impossible to establish such a school because we have no means, and secondly, for the reason that its necessity would not be fully understood. In some measure, the recently organized Dramatic Club is such a school and a very practical one too. In time, the Club may establish such a school as was given in the project.

    The public may attend these evening gatherings of the Club for a very small charge. We are informed that such a gathering will take place next Thursday. We are certain that the attendance will be large.

    Credit should be given to the energetic members of the Club and the management. The public and the members of the Club should be especially grateful to the organizer of the Club, Mr. S. Zahajkiewicz, the present instructor, who directed it into right channels. It was a patriotic act on his part, and he should receive credit, because he devotes his time to it in spite of the 4fact that he has many tasks of his own. The Club will be of great benefit to the parish and the entire Northwest Side.

    Judging by its present activities, the newly organized Polish Dramatic Club of the Polish Patriotic Society at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish, will have a greater importance than it seemed at ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 f
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 09, 1892
    From St. Casimir's Parish

    The parishioners of St. Casimir's Church have contributed $25 for the Immigration Home in New York. Rev. Father Kroll has sent this money to the New York office.

    Since the organization of this parish fourteen months ago, the various expenditures have totaled $7,127.66. The debt of the church has been cut down considerably, only $9,288 is outstanding. A complete financial report of the church will soon be published in this paper.

    Since there are over one hundred Polish families residing within a three mile radius of the church in Hawthorne, Reverend Father Kroll is making plans to build a school for Polish children.

    The parishioners of St. Casimir's Church have contributed $25 for the Immigration Home in New York. Rev. Father Kroll has sent this money to the New York office. Since the ...

    Polish
    II D 10, II B 2 f, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 13, 1892
    Evening School

    On Thursday, January 14, 1892, evening classes will begin at the school of St. Stanislaus Kostki's church at Bradley near Division, where the following subjects will be taught: A. English Lanugage. (1) Reading, writing, and grammar; (2) Arithmetic (to be given in Polish to those who are not advanced in English; those advanced in English will be given mathematics in that language). Polish and English teachers will serve as instructors. Tuition fee in these classes will be fifty cents a month for each subject taken.

    Notice: Those who desire advanced instruction in English and Polish should call at the office for registration. Special arrangements will be made for them.

    B. Polish language. (1) Reading, writing, and grammar for boys and men who do not know how to read or write; (2) Instruction in religion; (3) Mathematics: The rudiments of arithmetic to the beginners.

    2

    Those interested should apply to the office of the school, Thursday at 6:30 P.M. Registration will begin promptly. Classes will be officially opened.

    Free Sunday Classes

    For the younger generation who have received first holy communion, free afternoon classes will be held. History: United States and Poland. Bible history and religious instruction will complete the program.

    On Thursday, January 14, 1892, evening classes will begin at the school of St. Stanislaus Kostki's church at Bradley near Division, where the following subjects will be taught: A. English ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 14, 1892
    Evening School

    This evening will mark the beginning of evening classes for those of us who wish to make their education more complete and for those that desire to learn the principles of the three R's, reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic. Classes for beginners and advanced students will be given in English and Polish.

    Enrollment begins at 6:30 P.M. at the school office. A tuition fee of fifty cents a month will be charged for each subject. Those who have opportunity to attend evening classes, are urged to do so.

    In the English class reading, writing, grammar, history, and mathematics will be given.

    The Polish class will offer Polish reading, writing and grammar. Religious instruction will be also available.

    For the younger generation desiring to improve their knowledge, free Sunday afternoon classes will be held offering practically the same subjects.

    This evening will mark the beginning of evening classes for those of us who wish to make their education more complete and for those that desire to learn the principles ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, I A 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 01, 1892
    Evening School Classes Opened

    Because a majority of adults work during the day, they cannot attend the public schools or other institutions of learning. Therefore, evening school classes have been arranged for those Polish people desiring to continue their education. Both Polish and English classes are being conducted at St. Stanislaus Kostki's School. These classes are open to young and old.

    The Polish class offers to those who want an opportunity to further their knowledge in this field the following: Polish reading, dictation, mathematics and English translations. This class is also suitable for those that only know the rudiments of Polish.

    Reading, writing, arithmetic, and grammar, are taught in the English class.

    2

    This course is especially adaptable to those who are not well read in Polish, but have better understanding of English. This class gradually leads into the higher branches of English. Tuition for the above mentioned studies is fifty cents per month.

    Special training is offered to the Polish young men who are not so familiar with their native tongue, and lax in religious upbringing. Polish grammar, reading, writing, and religion, take up most of the study period. One dollar per month is charged for these classes.

    Persons interested in the evening school courses are urged to register at the school office at 6:30 P.M. tonight. At 7 o'clock, they will be ready to enter their respective rooms.

    Because a majority of adults work during the day, they cannot attend the public schools or other institutions of learning. Therefore, evening school classes have been arranged for those Polish ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 07, 1892
    Polish Patriotic Organization Forms Educational Department

    The Polish Patriotic Organization made plans to open an educational department, at its monthly meeting, held yesterday at 8 P.M., at St. Stanislaus Kostki's Parish. The financial committee also gave reports on the returns of the dramatic efforts of its affiliate, the Dramatic Club. The net profit of staging "Children of Israel" was $191.65.

    According to the plans revealed about the educational department, nine members will be chosen to make the plans. Among them will be the president of the patriotic organization, two priests, two teachers, two editors, and two young men. The secretary will interview all members chosen to see if they have agreed to accept the nomination. Further plans will be discussed at a meeting to be held March 27.

    The Polish Patriotic Organization made plans to open an educational department, at its monthly meeting, held yesterday at 8 P.M., at St. Stanislaus Kostki's Parish. The financial committee also gave ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 f, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 16, 1892
    Students of St. Stanislaus Kostki's School Present Variety Program Tuesday

    On Tuesday, April 19, the children of St. Stanislaus Kostki's school will present a variety program of entertainment at the school hall, Noble and Bradley Streets. The program will begin at 3:30 P. M. Admission will be twenty-five cents. The program will be as follows:

    1. Introduction march: "Golden Voices," Misses A. Malinska and C. Kacinska.

    2. Solo, accompanied by Choir.

    3. Piano Duo: "Redowa," Misses N. Carrol and M. Klosowska.

    2

    4. Congratulation of the children.

    5. Solo and Choir.

    6. "The Rights of Boys."

    7. Piano duo: "Bouquet," Misses A. Malinska and P. Krolik.

    8. Drills.

    9. Duet with piano accompaniment

    Misses B. Gordon, F. Kalinska, and M. Kurkowska.

    10. Piano duo, "Norma," Misses N. Carrol and F. Kosinska.

    3

    11. "Bouquet of Roses" and "Forget-Me-Nots."

    12. Choir: "The Lord is Great."

    13. Piano duo: "Vision of Paradise" Misses A. Malinska and B. Gordon.

    14. Sketch: Misses A. Busgieska and J. Grzadzinska.

    15. Solo and Choir.

    16. Piano duo: "Wild Roses," Misses M. Klosowska and M. Galonski.

    17. Quartet: "Orphan."

    18. Piano duo: "Gallop," Misses C. Kasinska and M. Carrol.

    19. Large Choir: "Praise Ye The Lord."

    On Tuesday, April 19, the children of St. Stanislaus Kostki's school will present a variety program of entertainment at the school hall, Noble and Bradley Streets. The program will begin ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 2 f