The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 18, 1891
    A Chronicle of Poles in America A Memorial Book of 1891 One Hundred Years after the Proclamation of the Constitution of the Third of May 1871

    I am going to publish a Polish memorial book entitled "A Chronicle of Poles in America," (Kronika Polska w Ameryce) in honor of the memorable anniversary of the Constitution of May 3, 1871, and as a proof of our existence here in exile.

    This book will give an account of all Polish celebrations in America, a list of speeches and speakers, also a detailed description of all Polish settlements in America, with a list containing the names of the inhabitants and the name and location of the sections from which they come.

    Furthermore, this book will also show how many members there are in each family. In other words, it will give correct information of the number of 2Poles living in America at present.

    Each settlement will be mentioned separately, and a brief record of it will be shown. It will tell when and by whom the settlement was founded. It will also reveal the first Polish settlers who built the first church and school. It will give the name of the first pastor and his successors.

    I already have the most important material, and desire to have all available information as soon as possible.

    Every true and well-thinking Pole will admit that this book will be a permanent record of Polish activities,of the spiritual and material progress of the Poles on American soil, and at the same time, it is a public protest against the slanders of our enemies who deny our good qualities and our right to make a livelihood.

    It will be a permanent record, I repeat, for the voice of the newspapers 3will soon die out and be forgotten, but such a book will be handed down as an inheritance from parents to children, from generation to generation for many years, and will be sent to the libraries in Washington where it will last for centuries. Besides, this book will be a beginning and a foundation of the Polish history of Poles in exile after the partition of Poland.

    Finally, this book being of a larger size than a regular photographic album, printed on good paper, beautifully illustrated, and in durable binding, will be an ornament in your home.

    The clergy, editors of newspapers, presidents and secretaries of organizations, and all societies are asked to give their kind co-operation and support to this publication in their vicinities. They are asked to send in data of their neighborhood, or to recommend a worthy citizen, a good writer, who would undertake this work. Kindly have him communicate with 4me, and I will be glad to give further instructions.

    The sooner I receive the particulars, the quicker the work will be finished.

    In conclusion, I wish to inform the public that in order to prevent any one from reprinting the book, or a possible competition, I have registered it in the proper office of the United States, a country so favorable toward the Poles. I also wish to announce that the book will be published by subscriptions, either cash or in four convenient payments, for which special canvassers will be engaged.

    Further details will be announced later. At present, I am waiting for the result of my appeal.

    Respectfully yours,

    I. Wendzinski

    488 Mitchell Street,

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Aug. 1, 1891.

    I am going to publish a Polish memorial book entitled "A Chronicle of Poles in America," (Kronika Polska w Ameryce) in honor of the memorable anniversary of the Constitution of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, II B 2 c, II C, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 15, 1891
    Polish Catholic Almanac in America

    Just off the press. A Catholic Almanac in the Polish language, for 1892, published specially for the Poles in America by the Polish Publishing Company, publishers of Dziennik Chicagoski. The price is twenty-five cents.

    This is the third edition of the Polish Catholic Almanac in America, and it is larger and better than the previous ones. It is printed on good quality paper, contains 208 pages, covers a great variety of interesting subjects, and is beautifully illustrated. Every purchaser of this almanac will receive absolutely free a beautiful wall calendar for 1892. The illustration on this calendar represents an image of our Lord's countenance, according to an original [painting] preserved at the Basilica of Saint Peter in the Vatican.

    Besides the calendar, the publishers are also giving fifty beautiful prizes.

    2

    These prizes, which are worth from fifty cents to two dollars each, will be raffled off in July of next year. Every almanac is provided with a number on the outside cover, giving the purchaser a chance to win one of these articles. The result of the raffle will be announced in the Almanac of 1893.

    As a novelty, every page of this almanac bears a reproduction of famous paintings and statues found in different parts of Poland. Each reproduction is fully described.

    These reproductions represent famous and miraculous pictures of the Holy Virgin of Budziszen, the Denevolent Virgin of Grebanin, the Holy Virgin of Wisniowicz, the Miraculous Virgin of Limanowa, and other famous pictures in Poland.

    The almanac contains many interesting features, such as "Old Year, New Year, 3and Christmas," poem by [S.] Zahajkiewicz; "Lives of St. John Cantius, St. Casimir, and Beatified Andrew Bobola"; "Discovery of America," "Deprive Me Not of My Faith!" "Persecution of Christians by Nero," "O Polish Mother" (a poem), "A Few Words on Celebrations", "Excommunication of Caesar Theodosius by Bishop Ambrose", "Peter Kiolbassa, the city treasurer," the Constitution of the United States, a list of Polish priests in the United States, and the Polish business directory of Chicago.

    This almanac also contains several full-page pictures, as follows: "Christmas," "The Faith of a Child," "Persecution of Christians by Nero," "Where is Consolation?" "Commemoration of the One-Hundredth Anniversary of the Polish Constitution of the Third of May," "Excommunication of Theodosius by Bishop Ambrose," and "Death of Saint Josephat."

    There are also other reproductions of paintings, some of them covering almost 4an entire page. These are "The New Year," "Before the Meal," "Sister Mary from St. Peter's Convent of Tours, France," "M. Dupont of Tours, France," "The Creators of the Constitution of the Third of May," "Warsaw Gazette of May 7, 1791," "Church of St. John of Jerusalem in Posen, Poland", and a portrait of Peter Kiolbassa.

    This almanac, in beautiful cardboard covers, especially adapted to the needs of the Poles in America, costs only twenty-five cents.

    Just off the press. A Catholic Almanac in the Polish language, for 1892, published specially for the Poles in America by the Polish Publishing Company, publishers of Dziennik Chicagoski. The ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 19, 1892
    Recent Publications by the Polish-American Publishing Association (Advertisement)

    Novels:

    Mother's Scapular (Szkaplerz Matki), by I. Machnikowski, to be published soon;

    Miraculous Pennies (Cudowne Groszki) and

    Beggar's Son (Syn Dziadowski) by S. Zahajkiewicz, price ten cents;

    2

    Prince of Black Magicians (Kiaze Czarnoksieznikow) by S. Zahajkiewcz, price ten cents.

    Special Books:

    Congratulations and Declamations (Powinszowania I n), by S. Zahajkiewicz, price ten cents.

    Novels: Mother's Scapular (Szkaplerz Matki), by I. Machnikowski, to be published soon; Miraculous Pennies (Cudowne Groszki) and Beggar's Son (Syn Dziadowski) by S. Zahajkiewicz, price ten cents; <a name="p2" class="page-break">2</a> ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 01, 1892
    Kosciuszko Monument Association

    Members of the Kosciuszko Monument Association have adopted a resolution to send out an appeal to all Polish newspapers, societies, organizations, and groups, including business men and corporations, asking them to support the Association. Polish groups abroad will also be contacted.

    In every letter, a questionnaire and a self-addressed envelope will be included. The list of names is now almost complete, and by the end of this week the letters will be in the mail.

    In addition to its mail campaign, the Association is organizing a group of house-to-house solicitors. This has been done in order to intensify the campaign and at the same time get new members, since every member 2of the group must belong to the Association. At present we need five new members for the Revision Commission. Candidates for this commission cannot qualify unless they are well known in Chicago.

    In order to increase the funds of the organization, the directors are planning to publish a memorial book, in which all prominent Poles will be listed, The book will also contain short biographies of artists, poets, musicians, heroes, and men of letters, as well as a historical sketch of Polish tradition and aphorisms. It will be illustrated with many pictures and artistic sketches. The Poles of America and Europe will be represented in this book, a reason why many prominent Poles are enthusiastic about it.

    "We hope that every Pole will support this cause and do his best to make 3the ideals of this organization possible," stated Dr. Casimir Midowicz, secretary of the Kosciuszko Monument Association.

    According to the secretary's report, forty nine persons have already contributed $132.91. Peter Kiolbassa, city treasurer, and Walter Nowaczewski contributed twenty five dollars each.

    Members of the Kosciuszko Monument Association have adopted a resolution to send out an appeal to all Polish newspapers, societies, organizations, and groups, including business men and corporations, asking them ...

    Polish
    II C, II B 2 d 3, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 06, 1892
    Szczesny Zahajkiewicz's New Play Published in Book Form

    "The Fern" or "Enchanted Night", a new play written by Szczesny Zahajkiewicz, which recently appeared in serial form, has been published in book form. Copies may be obtained at the office of the Dziennik Chicagoski, 141 West Division Street.

    "The Fern" or "Enchanted Night", a new play written by Szczesny Zahajkiewicz, which recently appeared in serial form, has been published in book form. Copies may be obtained at the ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 20, 1893
    Books

    The Larger Catechism of the Roman Catholic Religion for Parochial Schools (Chicago: Polish Publishers' Association, 1892). Price twenty-five cents.

    The Larger Catechism of the Roman Catholic Religion for Parochial Schools has just come off the press. Published by our Polish Publishers' Association, it contains answers to the second edition of Deharb's Catechism. It is in three parts, with lessons on the principles of the Roman Catholic religion. In addition, it contains the ministration and a collection of the most important prayers. The edition carries on its top cover a view of St. Stanislaus Kostkas Church. The need for a book such as this has long been felt in the Polish parochial schools of America, and it is believed that it will find many purchasers. It must be added that this catechism has received the gracious approbation of Archbishop Feehan.

    The Larger Catechism of the Roman Catholic Religion for Parochial Schools (Chicago: Polish Publishers' Association, 1892). Price twenty-five cents. The Larger Catechism of the Roman Catholic Religion for Parochial Schools ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 2 d 3, II A 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 01, 1893
    Polish-American Participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894 (Editorial)

    In accordance with our promise given to the readers of Dziennik Chicagoski, we return to a discussion of the Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894. We are leaving the article in the Emigration Review on the side for the time being, and turn oar attention to the letter received by Mr. Peter Kiolbassa from the directors of the Exposition.

    The letter, from its text, constitutes a formal invitation of the Poles in America to participate in the Lwow Exposition. The letter justifies our participation by the fact that 1894 is the hundredth anniversary of Kosciuszko's insurrection; that we should use the-results of our peacetime efferts as evidence to outsiders that we continue to exist and that we have a right to exist. On this principle, the directors of the exposition intend 2it to be not merely a display of provincial talent, but instead, a general manifestation involving all provinces of Poland, as far as political conditions will permit, of course.

    American Polonia has already been characteristically christened as the "fourth partition" by people in the old country. It is the least known "partition," if we may call it thus, for it has only recently been discovered by our brethren in Poland. But it attracts wide interest in Galicia and Poznan; it is discussed secretly in Russian Poland. In spite of the increased facilities of communication, in spite of the fact that we seek to acquaint our countrymen in Poland with our activities in many different ways, they still seem to be inaccurately informed. Until not long ago, they were completely unaware of our existence and development; today they probably overrate our strength and significance. If once we accept the premise that Poles living in America ought to retain their nationality, that they are under obligation to their mother country, we must admit that closer relations between American Polonia and its homeland are imperative. These relations ought to begin with mutual understanding. We admit also that occasion for such an understanding is presented by the Lwow Exposition, which, as we see, 3is planned on a broad scale and which will, no doubt, draw numerous visitors from all three divisions of Poland. And so it is quite logical that the directors should turn to American Polonia with a request that we submit examples of our work here to the Exposition. We ought not be unrepresented in this "national exhibition," as the letter describes it, since we consider ourselves a fragment of the Polish nation. And so, we ought to accept the invitation tendered by the directors of the exposition and prepare ourselves for participation in it. This is how the matter presents itself to our minds. We hope, too, that this neighborly viewpoint will be accepted by the Poles in America generally.

    More complicated are the questions: What form will our participation take? Who is to direct it? How large a fund is necessary for this purpose and how shall it be raised?

    While the letter from Lwow presents the matter in a general way, yet it already speaks of a Polish-American pavilion. In our opinion, this desire is a bit too bold. Obviously, the directors of the Exposition cannot be 4accurately informed, and hence they propose a project which presupposes that the Poles in America are able to carry a considerable expense. This is not true. We know well that our people in America are poor people, already weighed down with a great many burdens. Again, our people are almost exclusively workingmen, though a few are engaged in business. There are practically no independent Polish-American manufacturers. We have no industrial specimens to offer, therefore; even craftsmen are rare among us. Thus it can readily be seen that we would have too few specimens of manufacture, handicraft, etc., to necessitate a separate pavilion for their display. In place of this, our exhibit should give our brethren across the ocean a picture of our religious, intellectual, and national life. We build schools and churches, we publish books and newspapers, we organize societies for every conceivable purpose; this is the phase of our existence most interesting to our mother country, and we should strive to create the clearest possible conception of it. Our exhibit might consist of photographs of Polish schools and churches in America, bound volumes of our newspapers, books published here. We might show them the constitutions of our societies, their emblems, brochures, and in some cases, handwritten manuscripts. Such a 5collection would not be difficult to assemble, it could be sent to Poland at low cost, and a place could be found for its display at the Exposition. Best of all, it would give a clear picture of our life here. It may be that this picture would not altogether be complimentary, but at least it would be a truthful one. Obviously, aside from the above-mentioned exhibit, the completion of which would be more or less a public duty, it would be left to the initiative of private individuals, if such willing persons could be found, to supply specimens of industry, handicraft, etc. So much for the form which, in our opinion, our participation in the Lwow Exposition should take.

    The two remaining questions present no serious difficulties. Who shall direct it? Obviously, our newspapers first, and afterward, people of good will and action. Mr. Kiolbassa requested that we publish the letter he received and that all other Polish newspapers reprint it in order to disseminate the idea--to open discussion of the matter in the newspaper column. After it has been thoroughly discussed from all angles, Mr. Kiolbassa will call a mass meeting of Polish-American citizens to talk the matter over. It is practically certain that volunteers will be found to lend their services to 6the cause. This procedure should be followed by other Polish colonies, and eventually a central committee could be formed to take charge.

    Should the exhibit be arranged according to the lines we have proposed, the fund required would be small. The task of raising the money required would be comparatively simple; the fund could be satisfied partly by public donation and partly through the efforts of the individuals and societies most concerned.

    The matter of representation of our newspapers in the Exposition is primarily a question for newspapermen. We will leave its discussion for another time.

    In accordance with our promise given to the readers of Dziennik Chicagoski, we return to a discussion of the Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894. We are leaving ...

    Polish
    III H, II B 1 c 3, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 3, II A 3 a, I A 2 a, I B 3 c, II A 2, II D 1, III C, I C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 01, 1893
    Books

    The Polish Publishing Company recommends the following books now on sale:

    S. Zahajkiewicz, Cudowne Groszki (Miraculous Peas). Price ten cents.

    S. Zahajkiewicz, Ksiaze Czarnoksieznikow (The Prince of Necromancers). Price ten cents.

    S. Zahajkiewicz. Dzieci Izraela (Children of Israel). A Biblical drama. Price twenty-five cents.

    S. Zahajkiewicz, Toasts and Declamations. Price ten cents.

    The Polish Publishing Company recommends the following books now on sale: S. Zahajkiewicz, Cudowne Groszki (Miraculous Peas). Price ten cents. S. Zahajkiewicz, Ksiaze Czarnoksieznikow (The Prince of Necromancers). Price ten ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, II A 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 12, 1893
    Polish Publishing Company Stockholders' Meeting

    The annual stockholders' meeting of the Polish Publishing Company, publishers of Dziennik Chicagoski and Wiara I Ojczyzna (Faith and Fatherland), was held at the editorial offices of this paper. Among those present at the meeting were the Reverends Vincent Barzynski, S. Kobrzynski, J. Kasprzycki, and F. Byrgier, and Messrs. P. Kiolbassa, W. Jendrzejek, P. Ratkowski, T. Krolik, F. Kaczmarek, and A. Lakowka. Among those present from out of town were the Reverends U. Raszkiewicz, of Otis, Indiana; P. Cichocki, of Manitowoc, Wisconsin; and F. Wojtalewicz, of Hammond, Indiana. The Reverend Matkowski, of Bay City, Michigan, sent a representative, while Reverend Czyzewski, of South Bend, [Indiana], wired that he was unable to attend the meeting. The Reverend Sebastyanski notified the company that he had transferred his shares to the Nazarene Sisters Convent. In all, a majority of stockholders were present.

    A financial statement for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1892, to July 1, 21893, showed that the affairs of the company are in sound condition. The statement showed a surplus in spite of the fact that subscription to Wiara I Ojczyzna was not compulsory to members of Zjednoczenia (Polish Roman Catholic Union). The inventory report showed the company's assets to be $17,000. The stock of books (liquid assets) was valued at $10,000. The reports were accepted and the meeting turned its attention to other business.

    It was decided that the annual stockholders' meeting will be held not in July as heretofore, but on the first Wednesday after the fifteenth of January each year.

    The Reverend F. Byrgier was elected secretary to replace Father Kroll, who resigned on September 27 of last year, and the Reverend J. Kasprzycki was elected to the board of directors to fill the vacancy created by Father Gordon's departure for Poland. Election of officers was deferred to the next meeting.

    Finally, a committee was elected, consisting of the Reverends Byrgier, Czyzewski, and Mr. R. Ratkowski. This committee will audit the company's accounts 3for the past year, and with the co-operation of the manager and last years' auditing committee, it will verify the financial reports.

    Various improvements in the company's publications were discussed, but final decisions were left to the board of directors.

    As a whole, the meeting was a harmonious one: it demonstrated, moreover, that the Polish Publishing Company exists on a sound business footing.

    The annual stockholders' meeting of the Polish Publishing Company, publishers of Dziennik Chicagoski and Wiara I Ojczyzna (Faith and Fatherland), was held at the editorial offices of this paper. Among ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 2, II B 2 d 3, II A 2, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- August 12, 1893
    Concerning Rogosz' Projected Book of the Polish Nation

    We received the following letter for publication from Zbigniew Brodowski:

    "I have read the two notices published in your paper by Mr. J. Rogosz, well-known Polish novelist and journalist. These notices concerned the projected publication of Wielka Ksiega Narodu Polskiego[Book of the Polish Nation] , which is to contain all of our cultural and historical treasures--a memorial to our work, our creative efforts, and our honor. I am willing to admit that this project, so splendidly described by Mr. Rogosz, aroused my enthusiasm.

    "A work of this kind would certainly take its place in Polish literature if only it were executed along the proposed lines. It will be our pride and the pride of our children--a handbook from which we and our posterity can learn of our nation's moral and cultural activities. Everything that is beautiful and praiseworthy in our past and present will undoubtedly 2find a place in this book, which will teach our children, in Poland as well as here in America, of the greatness of our nation. Such a book should be in daily use in Polish homes; it should become a textbook teaching patriotism and faith in our nation's future.

    "The Book, then, will deserve recognition and support on the basis of its own merits. It is the more deserving of our support in that Mr. Rogosz promises to devote the last volume to a history of Polish culture in America; thus, in this way, our deeds and efforts will be perpetuated in the pages of a memorable work.

    "What does he ask of us? Our support. In my opinion, he has every right to demand our support. A work of such scope and importance as the Book of the Polish Nation is even more necessary to us than to the people in Poland. There, among their own people, on Polish soil, the past and its contributions are brought to mind by numerous historical relics, crosses and graves, churches and old castles, names of places, traditions and folk songs. The fields of Grunwald, Raclawice, Grochow, the walls of nn, 3Warsaw, and other fortresses all bespeak the past; museums and schools tell of the present. Here in America, we can only have memories of these places and things that are dear to us. Our children, raised here on foreign soil, never saw them; they are not familiar with our folk lore and songs. Here, in America, such a book will be of tremendous service; it will place before the eyes of the younger generation all those things which the older people cannot portray in words. And so, since we have the most to gain from this memorable work, we should be the first to support it.

    "Another reason why this duty rests with us is that our American Polonia enjoys conditions of unrestricted freedom which permit it to support a project of this kind. The Poles in Russian-occupied Poland, if they are to read the Book at all, will have to do it in secrecy, thus making it impossible to count upon their support. There remain only Galicia[Austrian occupation] , Poznan[German occupation] , and ourselves. Let us take up and fulfill the duty which so logically rests upon our shoulders.

    "You may ask: How may Mr. Rogosz' project be supported? The answer is 4quite simple. Mr. Rogosz does not ask for money in advance. Since he represents a reliable publishing house, since he has worked efficiently for many years in the literary field, he asks for no special trust, no advances. He asks only that we guarantee him eight hundred to fifteen hundred subscriptions to the Book. The million odd Poles in America should be able to do this. When the work is published, when the first installments reach us, then will we pay. Today we need only to assure him of our support. We must make up a list of those who are willing to contribute to the realization of this great work.

    "This is the duty of every Pole who can afford it. I have hopes that none of us will neglect it; from the bottom of my heart, I urge everyone to discharge himself of this duty.

    Chicago, January 11, 1893."

    We received the following letter for publication from Zbigniew Brodowski: "I have read the two notices published in your paper by Mr. J. Rogosz, well-known Polish novelist and journalist. These ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 3, IV