The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Zgoda -- October 19, 1892
    A Plea to the Poles in United States

    After completing its difficult tasks, the administration of Polish National Alliance informs us Poles residing in the United States, that the National Library and Museum shall be officially opened Saturday, Oct. 22, 1892 at 3 P.M., free to the public.

    The historical works, documents, and memoirs shall be found here, gift of honorable Dr. Kalussowki, who was the first one to lay the corner stone of this great institution known as the National Library and Museum.

    The one who knows and understands what a priceless store of knowledge the library and museum are for us, will be convinced that a national institution of this kind is necessary to us.

    The organ of P.N.A. wishes to inform everyone of this newly established institution. It is also asking everyone to patronize it, and by this act help the organization to go with its excellent work.

    After completing its difficult tasks, the administration of Polish National Alliance informs us Poles residing in the United States, that the National Library and Museum shall be officially opened Saturday, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 24, 1892
    Polish National Alliance Opens Museum and Library

    The Polish National Alliance Library and Museum was officially opened to the public Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. The institution was made possible through the gifts of Dr. H. Kalussowski of Washington, D. C., which are to be under the guardianship of the Alliance.

    The ceremonies took place at the Central Committee's headquarters on Noble Street. Besides the directors of the Library, presidents of many societies belonging to the Polish National Alliance were in attendance. There were also several members of the Kosciuszko Guard from Milwaukee, including Captain E. Slupecki. This group came to Chicago as a part of the Wisconsin State Militia to take part in the Columbus Day parade. They voluntarily attended the dedication ceremonies Saturday. Many other guests were also present.

    The group from Milwaukee opened the dedication ceremonies with a military 2salute.

    Adalia Satalecki was the first speaker. He associated the opening of the Library with the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus. The speaker also gave recognition to Dr. Kalussowski for his work, and mentioned the events leading to the opening of the institution. He concluded his speech by urging everyone to support this Library in the name of culture.

    The next speaker was the Secretary of the Polish National Alliance, A. Mallek, who read the speech of Dr. Kalussowski, the donor of the Library, and the proclamation of the establishment of the Library by the Central Committee. According to the statute the newly-opened institution is to be called "The Polish Library and Museum of Chicago, under the guardianship of the Polish National Alliance." Its official staff will be composed of nine directors, two of whom will be Dr. Kalussowski and his 3son, and the remaining seven of whom will be elected; the latter are to hold office for one year. The present directors are S. Kociemski, Dr. Casimir Midowicz, Max Drzemala, A. Blaszyczynski and Mr. J. Pulkowski. The directors choose officers from their own group.

    Later, during the dedication activities, the installation of Mr. Kociemski as president of the Library and guardian of its laws and documents took place.

    A. Koinski, secretary of the Library, then took the speaker's stand. He brought out the importance of culture for our national cause and urged everyone to benefit from the literary treasures of the newly-opened library.

    A letter from Dr. Kalussowski of Washington was read to the assembly; it thanked the directors for their work.

    4

    Dr. Midowicz thanked the visitors from Milwaukee for attending this affair....He averred that the library is the hearth from which radiate the rays of culture and education.....He urged everyone to work for this culture--and predicted the resurrection of Poland through the medium of work and culture!....

    The next speaker was Constantine Mallek of Wisconsin, secretary of Skarbo Naro Dowego (Polish National Fund). Using the Fund as an example, Mr. Mallek pointed out how quickly the drive was amassing money from small contributions. He earnestly pressed everyone to further the development of the new Library through continual and painstaking work.

    Mr. F. Gryglaszewski, present Censor of the Polish National Alliance, was present. He suggested that a register be kept of all persons visiting the Library. Captain Slupecki spoke in the name of his group.

    After the dedication ceremonies everyone visited the collections in the 5Museum and Library.

    The Polish National Alliance Library and Museum was officially opened to the public Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. The institution was made possible through the gifts of Dr. H. Kalussowski ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III B 3 a, II B 2 b, III B 2, III D, III H, IV
  • Zgoda -- November 30, 1892
    The Polish Library and National Museum

    It is with great pleasure that we wish to announce the fact that the donations to the Polish National Museum and Library have not ceased pouring in.

    Some organizations are donationg various kinds of books, others many important tokens or priceless works of art. We name a few, such as Mr. Czaplinski, who donated Webster's Dictionary, in English; Mr. Stanislaus Walewski, who gave seven volumes of Tarlo; Mr. Wendycz gave Licht und Schattenbilder Des New York Lebens, by James McCabe; the Kosciuszko Organization offered the complete works of J. I. Kraszewski, consisting of sixty-one books; and Mr. S. Nicki gave a piece of metal from the original coffin in which Adam Mickiewicz the greatest Polish poet, was buried.

    For these gifts we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

    A. Koinski

    Secretary.

    It is with great pleasure that we wish to announce the fact that the donations to the Polish National Museum and Library have not ceased pouring in. Some organizations are ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 27, 1895
    To the Poles of America Relative to the Building of the Kosciusko Monument

    (The following announcement was received by Dziennik Chicagoski for publication.)

    Chicago, February 26, 1895.

    A few years ago a large number of people got together and proposed the building of a monument in one of our parks in Chicago to our immortal hero of two continents, Thaddeus Kosciusko. This movement received great impetus from the Polish people from the beginning, but the enthusiasm dwindled. Sporadic attempts at reviving this spirit failed. With each attempt the contributions became smaller.

    Our committee has finally established itself on a lasting and firm foundation, for it has already collected a substantial sum of money. And, what is more important, measures have been taken so that this fund will not be endangered, 2and sooner or later the aims of the committee will be realized. Our committee, with serious concern, has made an investigation of the Polish press, which has not been very favorable toward us. All of its allegations have been taken under consideration and dealt with objectively. No personal feeling has entered into their treatment, for they are regarded with the utmost respect and not with condemnation, since they express a cross section of Polish national feeling.

    I wish to acknowledge the fact that in reality our committee had been asleep for a certain time, as the press charges, but the causes which brought this about will probably justify the lethargy which may have been mistaken for negligence in other directions. For although the past two years of depression brought hardships to all throughout America, and brought unemployment to a large number of the Polish people, the Poles were able to muster enough strength to rally their spirit toward the making of sacrifices. Reference is being made to the contributions for Polish Day at the World's Columbian Exposition, the Polish Hospital, the many parish fairs, and the Lwow Fair. All this was no easy task amid constant unemployment, but the Polish people 3quietly donated pennies and dollars for the various worthy endeavors. This committee, realizing the tremendous pressure the Poles were undergoing, decided to abandon temporarily its drive for funds for the Kosciusko monument until a more favorable time.

    A statement showing the amount of money received is regularly published in the organ of the Polish National Alliance, Zgoda, Gazeta Katolicka (Catholic Gazette) and Dziennik Chicagoski. All the contributions accounted for in this respect are deposited in the bank of P. O. Stensland, a reputable individual, who has been endorsed by many of our leading citizens. Mr. Stensland has insured the safety of the funds. He has been purposely chosen treasurer, although he is of another nationality. This eliminates any excuses harbored by our enemies, especially a few of the Polish papers that have opposed this drive, and any unfavorable insinuations about the way the committee handles the contributions.

    Almost a thousand dollars (2250 gulden) has been paid out of the funds for the Kosciusko Monument Contest. The three models that received awards may 4be seen at our Polish Museum, 574 Noble Street, Chicago, Illinois. Mention also must be made of the five thousand dollars that has been loaned to Holy Trinity Parish at five per cent for one year. This money was loaned to the parish because of its sincere efforts to foster Polish culture through the building of a new Polish school. When a critical moment arose that threatened the completion of the school building, the committee decided to loan the money.

    Whatever has been done has been done openly. All of our actions have been turned over to the Polish press for criticism, and efforts have been made to remedy any objections that have been honestly and sincerely criticized. At no time were there any derogatory remarks made about the suggested changes.

    The Kosciusko Monument Fund Committee, which has opened the drive by substantial contributions from its directors, has been performing all its duties gratis, and it is determined to finish the work it has started with the support of the Polish public.

    5

    At the present time it is impossible to start work on the monument because there are not sufficient funds. We have learned from past experience that once something is started with inadequate sums of money it always brings untold troubles and problems. As to the cost of the monument, this will be decided in the future. Discussions about this will be held later. However, one thing is certain--the monument which is finally erected must leave a lasting impression upon the American public. In order to attain this, there is only need of good will, desire and patriotic understanding of this project.

    Therefore, in the name of the Kosciusko Monument Fund Committee, I appeal to you, brothers, as spring brings with it better times, to think anew about the monument for our hero, Thaddeus Kosciusko. This action will cover our nationality with honor before the American public, and will act as a manifestation before our enemies; for although Poland has been in captivity for a century her indomitable spirit has not been defeated--rather it is reviving through sacrifices and patriotism made by her children on strange soil.

    6

    Let us become active, brothers! During this year of national mourning when the thought of ostentatious social celebration has been set aside in our patriotic hearts which are filled with this tragic loss far beyond the seas [1895 was set aside by the Poles to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the third partition of Poland], let us turn our hearts to reminiscences of Poland and the fostering of Polish spirit in America at the various planned national affairs, lectures, etc., and remember the Kosciusko Monument Fund drive. Let everyone contribute several pennies for this noble cause. God will reward the generous donors, and the monument will stand as a manifestation of the poor Polish refugees in America.

    In the name of the Kosciusko Monument Fund Committee,

    Zbigniew Brodowski, president

    (The following announcement was received by Dziennik Chicagoski for publication.) Chicago, February 26, 1895. A few years ago a large number of people got together and proposed the building of ...

    Polish
    II C, II B 2 d 1, III B 3 a, II B 2 b, I A 2 a, III H, IV
  • Zgoda -- July 15, 1897
    The First Polish Photography School That Was Establishsed in America

    Our popular Polish artist, better known to us as the "King of all Polish photographers". Mr. John W. Idzikowski, opened a photography school at 433 Milwaukee Avenue, here in Chicago.

    Mr. Idzikowski's aim is that the Poles, who care for a career in this branch of art, can assure themselves of being well-tutored here for their future, when they seek better positions in the art of photography.

    At present there are three Polish photographers, while in other nationalities we find hundreds, as for instance we have 445 German photographers, 305 Italians, 210 French, and 150 Irish.

    We wish Mr. Idzikowski the best of luck and success and support his aspiration--working for the benefit of the Poles, that being his aim.

    Our popular Polish artist, better known to us as the "King of all Polish photographers". Mr. John W. Idzikowski, opened a photography school at 433 Milwaukee Avenue, here in Chicago. ...

    Polish
    II A 2, II B 2 b
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- August 01, 1908
    Let Us Promote Knowledge (Editorial)

    Sunday, tomorrow, as an annual custom of the Polish National Alliance, the Library and Museum are arranging a summer outing, the so - called picnic. The proceeds are designated for the purchase of new books, and to increase the collections in the museum. This institution of knowledge is controlled by the Central Board of the P.N.A. and renders priceless service in all communities, especially in Chicago. If some of our readers would visit the Alliance Library, they would see the many persons reading Polish writings and books without charge to them. The Library is not supported by special donations from philanthropists who contribute liberally to educational causes; neither does it possess special funds, nor demand financial assistance of conventions of the P.N.A. However, it unfolds the functions of its financial support, which comes mostly from Polish citizens of Chicago, in a splendid manner. The Library and its collections in the Museum are an honor to all members of the P.N.A. It was founded by the late Dr. Kalusowski of Washington, an upright man and a great patriot who saw enlightenment, in the future, of those people who are of Polish birth. This Library grew from its modest beginning to considerable strength; and, we can boldly say, is today, the largest and best equipped Polish Library in America.

    2

    The development of our Library can be credited to the good will of our brethren of the P.N.A. in Chicago, who sincerely assisted its growth, through concerts and outings; obtaining therefrom funds to increase its size and strength from year to year until, today, this Library contains six- thousand select works, which are principally by Polish authors; besides these, it contains a liberal collections of English, French, Lithuanian, German, Latin, Italian, Russians and Spanish works. The Library also shelteres the splendid National Museum, containing a valuable collection of relics. There are letters written by Polish kings and prominent men before and after the partition of Poland; there are beautiful photographs of famous heroes of Polish insurrections, maps, statues, medals, pictures, hand paintings, precious stones, and a splendid numismatic collection of Polish coins, from the time of Boleslaw Chrobry, to the present day. The Library is conveniently located in a room of the P.N.A., 102-104 W. Division Street and is operated by a librarian and custodian. The daily average of persons reading Polish, European, and American literature, is about 50; books are loaned, each month, to about 3,000 persons. This treasure of knowledge is entirely dependant upon the good will of its community. A special commission, or department, which has jurisdiction of the Library and its collection of relics, also the collection funds for new works, is appointed by 3the Central Board of the P.N.A., at each convention. Thanks are due to the advocators of knowledge, who donate several hundred volumes each year. The funds, as we have previously stated, are raised by arranging - evening socials, concerts, picnics, other entertainments; contributions are also accepted.

    Our institution is sincerely enjoying the support of the community, which is shown by the large attendance of Poles and non - members of the P.N.A. Money derived from these entertainments replenishes the treasury of the Library. So this year, as has been the custom in other years, directors of the Library are arranging a picnic and are hoping that our community will remember this temple of knowledge, by giving financial aid to this worthy cause. Every book acquired by this Library is another torch light of knowledge. So, dear countrymen, do not forget that it is your sacred duty to support this treasure, morally, and materially!

    American people donate millions for educational purposes, knowing that in progress lies the strength of the Nation. Therefore, let us follow their example by laying our contributions on the altar of knowledge; surely, we will not regret it! Let our countrymen attend the picnic in large numbers, on August 2nd, and 4add a stone to the foundation of enlightenment; a cause that will serve pleasant memories. We appeal to you, and solicit the attendance of all members of the P.N.A., at this picnic, to rejoice in the fact that we will receive the benefit of the vast store of knowledge, that we helped make this great educational institution a grand reality in Chicago.

    Sunday, tomorrow, as an annual custom of the Polish National Alliance, the Library and Museum are arranging a summer outing, the so - called picnic. The proceeds are designated for ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 2, I A 1 a, II B 1 c 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 11, 1908
    New Polish Catholic Hospital

    Work on the new Polish Catholic hospital has begun. It will be named the "Franciscan Sisters'," and will cost $50,000. This new section will be adjoining the old building located at 365 Ridge Avenue. This became necessary when many patients were seeking admittance to this hospital, but the old structure was not large enough to accommodate these people. This hospital is located on the shores of Lake Michigan.

    The biggest share of the funds were donated by Polish Catholic churches in Chicago, the rest was given by well-to-do business men of Evanston.

    During this time the second conference was held in regard to building the new Polish Catholic University of St. Ignatz, which is quietly progressing forward. This is proof that the Polish Catholic people are doing everything possible to expand the Roman-Catholic religion in Chicago and the surrounding towns.

    Work on the new Polish Catholic hospital has begun. It will be named the "Franciscan Sisters'," and will cost $50,000. This new section will be adjoining the old building located ...

    Polish
    II D 3, II B 2 b, III C
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- January 25, 1909
    Polish People's University

    Lectures for the week of January, 24, to 30th:

    Sunday, 3 p.m. in the hall of Park No. 1, Noble and Chicago Aves: Technical Improvements, K. Szymanski, C. E. at 8:30 p. m.

    Tuesday: Evolution of the Earth - Dr. Czaki.

    Wednesday: Geography - J. Kochanowicz.

    Thursday: Evolution of the Earth - Dr. Czaki.

    Friday: Geography: J. Kochanowicz

    Dr. Jul. Szymanski, Sec. P.P.U.

    Lectures for the week of January, 24, to 30th: Sunday, 3 p.m. in the hall of Park No. 1, Noble and Chicago Aves: Technical Improvements, K. Szymanski, C. E. at ...

    Polish
    II B 2 b, II B 2 g, I A 3, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- July 23, 1910
    Library and Reading Room of Polish National Alliance a Great Treasure (Editorial)

    The library and reading room of the Polish National Alliance are cherished as great treasures by Polish readers. That treasure of knowledge is conveniently located in the P.N.A. building, next to the Polish National Museum. Reports of the library commission show that within one month 1,572 books were rented to 808 persons, while 660 persons made use of the reading room. The library and the adjacent museum were visited by 62 guests and favored with numerous donations in the form of books and precious antiquarian collections.

    Although under the control of the P.N.A., the library and museum are sustained by their own powers and facilities, which owe their care to the solicitude of a special committee, appointed by the central board of the P.N.A., who manage those joint and kindred institutions. In a truly conscientious pursuance of its duty, that special committee cares for the funds which are used for the purchase of new books, bindings and repairs, also for new collections of natural, scientific and literary value, together with the free offerings, and donations from patrons of the library and the reading room. This committee also arranges for excursions and concerts, the proceeds of which are added to the fund.

    The library and reading room of the Polish National Alliance are cherished as great treasures by Polish readers. That treasure of knowledge is conveniently located in the P.N.A. building, next ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 2
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- August 08, 1910
    Picnic for the Benefit of the Polish National Alliance, Library and Museum

    A grand picnic was held yesterday for the benefit of the Polish National Alliance Library and Museum. Three special trains brought about 1,500 persons to the park. The park, however, was not overcrowded, as has been the case on previous occasions, therefore, there was sufficient space to accomodate all.

    The program was arranged by the committee to the complete satisfaction of all. The young element and also the older people enjoyed themselves, dancing to the tunes of a first class orchestra. In another section of the park, stands for refreshments were conveniently located.

    Friends and acquaintances were camping in great numbers on the bank of the stream which flows through the park. Contests, races, and various other games were also part of the program. One group of picnickers left the grounds at 7 p.m., the last group left on the 9 p.m. train.

    Although tired, all returned in good spirits with pleasant memories of an excellent time; and there is no doubt, all enjoyed a well earned sleep.

    A grand picnic was held yesterday for the benefit of the Polish National Alliance Library and Museum. Three special trains brought about 1,500 persons to the park. The park, however, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, II B 1 c 3, III B 2, II B 3