The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- October 26, 1887
    Polish Library in New York

    We are informed that in New York, Mr. Sigmund Slupski, formerly a newspaper editor in Radom, Poland, opened a Polish Library; it is also a renting library.

    A Polish library, conducted skillfully by a man well trained in his profession can bring numerous social benefits, which it already has done. It will continue to give true service, providing the renting dept. has many calls for good books, which is one way of running this library.

    For that reason we welcome this new Polish enterprise, and in the beginning we send our sincere and heartiest congratulations.

    We will also add that this new library has books dealing with Polish ways of living. These books are also for sale if people desire them. This library also takes care of sending letters, and other means of communicating with people in Europe.

    2

    Therefore that is the reason why this field is open for a capable man we have one of our prominent Polish editors working in the research dept. dealing with the selling of old books.

    Mr. Sienkiewicz is in charge of this research dept; he is honest, trustworthy, and capable of doing this work in this new Polish library solely for the benefit of the Polish people.

    We are informed that in New York, Mr. Sigmund Slupski, formerly a newspaper editor in Radom, Poland, opened a Polish Library; it is also a renting library. A Polish library, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a
  • Zgoda -- December 10, 1890
    Proclamation to National Societies in Chicago

    Dear Fellow Citizens:

    About ten years ago the Harmony Society of Chicago sent notice that in order to preserve the language of our forefathers they demanded the building of a Polish library.

    The Harmony Society sent letters to all Polish societies and organizations to join with us, to help support, upkeep and to enrich this library. Only few societies were interested in this undertaking. They donated money and elected the officers. In their constitution they resolved that this library be made free to all our fellow citizens, and to the Polish people interested in supporting a library of this kind. In a short time whether due to lack of money or for other reasons the societies withdrew, leaving the upkeep of this library upon the shoulders of the Harmony Society, and the Society of Teachers. Shortly afterwards the Society of Teachers withdrew, leaving the Harmony Society the sole means of support for this library. The kind of support given this library by our society in the last few years can be ascertained by examing our books. The newest and best books obtainable written by prominent Polish poets and writers can also be obtained from the secretary. Today the library numbers nearly 1,500 volumes.

    2

    To this day the library is and will continue to be the property of the Harmony Society. There is a clause in the constitution stating that when times are better and the people show more interest in supporting an institution of this kind, the Harmony Society will permit other Polish societies to join and help enlarge and enrich this library.

    In the last ten years since this library was established, many new societies were organized which could help continue this library. Even the P. N. A. at the last meeting, held in November has taken steps with the aid of the Harmony Society, to open its own Polish library.

    For nearly one hundred thousand Polish people in our city, we should have at least one good library in a beautiful building, with books of the best and highest quality. But one society such as the Harmony, cannot take care of so great an undertaking. Therefore we are asking you with the permission of the officers. Do you, dear fellow citizens, want to work hand in hand in supporting, upkeeping and enriching the Polish library in Chicago? Do you want to take care of it, own it and add to the financial needs of this library? The cost of the upkeep is not very high. It is up to you to donate whatever you can. We suggest that each society interested in this send two or three delegates to the special meeting to be held Sunday evening, January 11,1891 at Nalepinski's Hall.

    3

    There it can be decided whether the societies are in favor of one big library or whether each society will organize and maintain a library of their own.

    At this meeting a new constitution will be written to be used by all libraries whether united as one or under their own separate ownership. A central group of officers will be elected, a librarian or librarians to be selected from the best men obtainable, through the aid and votes of all the present delegates. All delegates chosen to represent their group, please be present.

    Harmony Society of Chicago

    M. Rzeszotarski, President

    J. Olbinski, Secretary

    Dear Fellow Citizens: About ten years ago the Harmony Society of Chicago sent notice that in order to preserve the language of our forefathers they demanded the building of a ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 a, II B 1 d
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 18, 1890
    A Reading Room in St. Stanislaus Parish (Editorial)

    We have learned that the Saint Stanislaus Parish will soon have a reading room in connection with its library. The room, designed for that purpose, in the new building, is nearly completed. The reading room will be supplied with various newspapers, domestic and foreign. And twice a week selected stories, poems, and other literature will be read aloud. We support this undertaking wholeheartedly, and hope the program is realized as soon as possible.

    2

    The long winter evenings are already with us, and many persons instead of passing their time in saloons, will gladly accept this new entertainment in which they will find pleasure and great benefit. This will help the growth of the library and probably create a desire for reading which is unfortunately, so little practiced by us now.

    The management of the library complains that only a small number of people take advantage of books which were imported at high cost. This small number of readers is composed principally of young people. The number of older persons who should set an example for the young by borrowing books from the library, is so small that they can be counted on the fingers of one hand. Not even one young woman has sought to borrow a book. Have 3young women forgotten how to read Polish, or do they read only English?

    Right now, while we are writing this article, we have been informed that the reading room is almost ready and will be opened in a few days.

    We will inform our readers when the room is ready for use. The opening of the new quarters will increase the number of patrons of the library, and our fellow-citizens, young and old, men and women, boys and girls, will enjoy many happy and profitable hours in the new reading room.

    We have learned that the Saint Stanislaus Parish will soon have a reading room in connection with its library. The room, designed for that purpose, in the new building, is ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III A
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 27, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    St. Casmir Young Men's Society, in St. Stanislaus Parish, donated $50 to the parish library fund. This fund will be used for enlarging the parish library, especially the establishment of a reading room. The library is in charge of the Polish Patriots' Club, and this fund is at its disposal. The young men of this society certainly deserve due credit and hearty support in every respect. They are a good example to our Polish youth, and we hope they will be Polish patriots, even though some of them are born in America and will remain here.

    St. Casmir Young Men's Society, in St. Stanislaus Parish, donated $50 to the parish library fund. This fund will be used for enlarging the parish library, especially the establishment of ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III B 2, III C, III E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 10, 1891
    Polish Activities Polish Library Society Holds Annual Meeting

    "The Saint Vincent de Paul Society, organized to maintain a library at Saint Adelbert's Parish, will hold its annual business meeting at 4 P. M., Sunday, Dec. 13, at the parish hall.

    "At this meeting, the election of new officers will take place; the financial statement will be read; new members will be admitted; and dues will be received.

    "The officers and members of the Society, as well as the parishioners, are invited to this meeting. Everybody--young and old, fathers and mothers, young men and young women--should gather at the parish hall in order to join the Society, the purpose of which is as follows:

    1. To enlighten the Polish people.

    2. To discourage among the Polish people the reading of unwholesome newspapers and other immoral, irreligious, Masonic, and godless literature which poison their minds, and which are spread among our people by the devil and our enemies.

    2

    3. To make good Poles and Catholics out of the members of the parish.

    4. To discourage our people, especially the youth, from frequenting during their leisure time places of questionable character, by supplying them with wholesome amusements and good literature.

    "The initiation fee is only twenty-five cents, and the monthly dues are ten cents. Every member is given a library card which entitles him to borrow books from the parish library, according to the rules and regulations of the Society.

    "It is the duty of every parishioner to support his parish library, which is a school for the adults and a mental nourishment for our souls.

    "I hope the public attendance at this annual meeting will be considerable.

    Respectfully yours,

    John Ciesielski,

    Secretary and Librarian

    731 Van Horn Street.

    "The Saint Vincent de Paul Society, organized to maintain a library at Saint Adelbert's Parish, will hold its annual business meeting at 4 P. M., Sunday, Dec. 13, at the ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 1 e, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 04, 1892
    Poles in Chicago Extracts from the Annual Meeting of the Patriotic Organization, December, 27, 1891

    After the prayer the secretary read the minutes of the previous meeting, and the financial secretary gave his report, which was accepted without objections.

    It was suggested that the library be called "Parishina," and that the absent librarian should give a resume of its condition and operations at the next session.

    A motion was made and carried that a mass be said for the purpose of asking heavenly assistance for our persecuted brothers in Europe. The mass will be said on the first Friday of each month. The pastor of the parish had been informed and has been asked to make the announcement in this paper. [Translator's note: Identity of church and pastor not given.]

    2

    The secretary read the constitution of the newly formed dramatic unit of the Patriotic Organization. At the conclusion of the reading Mr. Kralkowski made the suggestion that officers be elected to head this new group. As a result, three members were elected to the committee: Peter Ligman, F. Zagrzebski, and T. Krolik. They will examine the constitution and will give it full consideration for adoption.

    A program for the month of January was planned, and the expense [involved] was discussed. The execution of these plans will be more generally discussed at a meeting set for this purpose for January 4th. A letter of invitation was read requesting the presence of this group to visit the Young Men's Club of St. Casimir's Church. The members lauded the work of the latter organization and accepted the invitation for the 17th of this month.

    Pastor W. [only the initial is given] gave a vivid description of conditions among our people under Russian rule. A prayer was offered for their deliverance 3, and all the members were asked to attend the mass meeting in the Polish hall to protest against these unjust persecutions.

    Peter Ligman was elected president, F. Wleklinski was chosen secretary, and Szczeszny Zahajkiewicz was picked for the treasurer's chair. All the members of the financial committee were re-elected to fill the vacancy. Peter Czyzan was chosen marshall, and John Kunowski assistant marshal.

    After the prayer the secretary read the minutes of the previous meeting, and the financial secretary gave his report, which was accepted without objections. It was suggested that the library ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 2 a, III C, III H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 30, 1892
    St. Stanislaus Kostki's Parish Library Moved to New Quarters

    Last Wednesday the library of St. Stanislaus Kostki's Church was moved to its new quarters. [Place not given]. Those who wish to avail themselves of the books offered for circulation can do so by depositing a dollar as a surety bond and paying five cents per month for membership. Books are loaned for a period of fourteen days, without charge.

    Last Wednesday the library of St. Stanislaus Kostki's Church was moved to its new quarters. [Place not given]. Those who wish to avail themselves of the books offered for circulation ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 03, 1892
    The Patriotic Organization Merits a Larger Membership

    The Patriotic organization, under the auspices of the St. Stanislaus Kostka's parish, is the only one of its kind in the United States whose only aim is to elevate the position of the Pole to a higher plane, and to instill a better patriotic feeling. This society held its second meeting of the year Sunday at the parish headquarters.

    Members of this group do not gain any material profit by being part of this association. Many times they make small voluntary contributions for patriotic purposes. The activity of these men is carried on without much publicity, however, their purposes are praiseworthy.

    It is not surprising to discover that where there is in operation a project without remuneration for the benefit of the people, there will not be found any noted patriotic haranguers. There will be found only a small handful of people who offer their services willingly, who understand the need for patriotic teaching, and who pursue this work quietly.

    2

    There are slightly over two hundred persons belonging to the Patriotic Organization. We have called such a group a small handful because we feel that out of this great parish there ought to be twenty thousand represented in this club. For criticism and reproach, there are found many times this number, but for an altruistic endeavor, such as this organization is performing, there are hardly over two hundred. This hurts. Although we must admit that our ranks are growing daily, we feel that it is at too small a rate.

    Besides the routine matters, the committee of the Patriotic Organization ratified the constitution of the Dramatic Club, a branch of this group, during the last meeting. The question of the library was settled. It was decided to call it a "parishional library," because it was felt that all the members of the parish would benefit by it if it were open to them.

    Father Vincent Barzynski announced that a special committee would be appointed to take charge.

    3

    Friday February 5, was set aside as a day of prayer for the oppressed Poles in Russia. The Polish Welfare organization has been asked to participate. All the Poles are urged to take part.

    The newly confirmed Dramatic club, according to an accepted resolution, will stage a three-act play sometime this month. A committee has been appointed to make plans for the debut.

    The Patriotic organization, under the auspices of the St. Stanislaus Kostka's parish, is the only one of its kind in the United States whose only aim is to elevate the ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 2 a, II D 1, I C, IV
  • Zgoda -- October 19, 1892
    A Plea to the Poles in United States

    After completing its difficult tasks, the administration of Polish National Alliance informs us Poles residing in the United States, that the National Library and Museum shall be officially opened Saturday, Oct. 22, 1892 at 3 P.M., free to the public.

    The historical works, documents, and memoirs shall be found here, gift of honorable Dr. Kalussowki, who was the first one to lay the corner stone of this great institution known as the National Library and Museum.

    The one who knows and understands what a priceless store of knowledge the library and museum are for us, will be convinced that a national institution of this kind is necessary to us.

    The organ of P.N.A. wishes to inform everyone of this newly established institution. It is also asking everyone to patronize it, and by this act help the organization to go with its excellent work.

    After completing its difficult tasks, the administration of Polish National Alliance informs us Poles residing in the United States, that the National Library and Museum shall be officially opened Saturday, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, II B 2 b, III B 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 24, 1892
    Polish National Alliance Opens Museum and Library

    The Polish National Alliance Library and Museum was officially opened to the public Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. The institution was made possible through the gifts of Dr. H. Kalussowski of Washington, D. C., which are to be under the guardianship of the Alliance.

    The ceremonies took place at the Central Committee's headquarters on Noble Street. Besides the directors of the Library, presidents of many societies belonging to the Polish National Alliance were in attendance. There were also several members of the Kosciuszko Guard from Milwaukee, including Captain E. Slupecki. This group came to Chicago as a part of the Wisconsin State Militia to take part in the Columbus Day parade. They voluntarily attended the dedication ceremonies Saturday. Many other guests were also present.

    The group from Milwaukee opened the dedication ceremonies with a military 2salute.

    Adalia Satalecki was the first speaker. He associated the opening of the Library with the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus. The speaker also gave recognition to Dr. Kalussowski for his work, and mentioned the events leading to the opening of the institution. He concluded his speech by urging everyone to support this Library in the name of culture.

    The next speaker was the Secretary of the Polish National Alliance, A. Mallek, who read the speech of Dr. Kalussowski, the donor of the Library, and the proclamation of the establishment of the Library by the Central Committee. According to the statute the newly-opened institution is to be called "The Polish Library and Museum of Chicago, under the guardianship of the Polish National Alliance." Its official staff will be composed of nine directors, two of whom will be Dr. Kalussowski and his 3son, and the remaining seven of whom will be elected; the latter are to hold office for one year. The present directors are S. Kociemski, Dr. Casimir Midowicz, Max Drzemala, A. Blaszyczynski and Mr. J. Pulkowski. The directors choose officers from their own group.

    Later, during the dedication activities, the installation of Mr. Kociemski as president of the Library and guardian of its laws and documents took place.

    A. Koinski, secretary of the Library, then took the speaker's stand. He brought out the importance of culture for our national cause and urged everyone to benefit from the literary treasures of the newly-opened library.

    A letter from Dr. Kalussowski of Washington was read to the assembly; it thanked the directors for their work.

    4

    Dr. Midowicz thanked the visitors from Milwaukee for attending this affair....He averred that the library is the hearth from which radiate the rays of culture and education.....He urged everyone to work for this culture--and predicted the resurrection of Poland through the medium of work and culture!....

    The next speaker was Constantine Mallek of Wisconsin, secretary of Skarbo Naro Dowego (Polish National Fund). Using the Fund as an example, Mr. Mallek pointed out how quickly the drive was amassing money from small contributions. He earnestly pressed everyone to further the development of the new Library through continual and painstaking work.

    Mr. F. Gryglaszewski, present Censor of the Polish National Alliance, was present. He suggested that a register be kept of all persons visiting the Library. Captain Slupecki spoke in the name of his group.

    After the dedication ceremonies everyone visited the collections in the 5Museum and Library.

    The Polish National Alliance Library and Museum was officially opened to the public Saturday afternoon at three o'clock. The institution was made possible through the gifts of Dr. H. Kalussowski ...

    Polish
    II B 2 a, III B 3 a, II B 2 b, III B 2, III D, III H, IV