The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 11, 1892
    Fair at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish

    A meeting of the Church and Parish committees of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish was held at the church rectory, Sunday, October 9, at 4 P. M. During the course of the session it was agreed to hold a fair on the church grounds for the purpose of raising funds to complete the new church tower and build a stone sidewalk and stairs in front of the church.

    In connection with the fair it was also agreed to hold a lottery, which will help to raise funds for the proposed improvements. This lottery, along with the fair, will open Saturday evening, October 22, and will continue for two weeks, except Fridays and days of inclement weather.

    The following committees were chosen to assist in this work:

    1. The Management Committee, which will assist Reverend Vincent Barzynski, is as follows: T. Krolik, A. Rudnicki, J. Paszkiewicz, J. Mucha, Aug. Kowalski, 2F. Wleklinski, P. Ratkowski, and J. Laska.

    2. The Financial Committee is composed of the following: John Maca, A. Rudnicki, Paul Ratkowski, J. Lamczyk, Louis Biadaszkiewicz, and T. Ostrowski.

    3. The Prize Committee, besides Reverend Barzynski, is made up of the following parishioners: Aug. Kowalski, F. Wleklinski, J. Kolodziejski, and T. Krolik.

    4. The Cigar Committee is as follows: F. Kaczmarek, A. Rudnicki, and F. Maca.

    5. The Music Committee: Jacob Mucha, F. Kosnowski, and J. Walkowiak.

    6. Buffet and Table Committee: J. Paszkiewicz, J. Kortas, J. Arkuszewski, W. Jedrzejek, Aug. Kowalski, A. Szule, and F. Wleklinski.

    A meeting of the Church and Parish committees of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish was held at the church rectory, Sunday, October 9, at 4 P. M. During the course of ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 17, 1892
    Fair at St. Michael Archangel Parish in South Chicago

    A fair is to open tomorrow evening at St. Michael Archangel Parish in South Chicago. The fair will continue until November 23, with the exception of Fridays. The proceeds will go toward the building of a new church and school. Reverend Adolph Nowicki, the energetic pastor of the parish, has prepared many surprises. Among the many entertainments offered, there will be colorful fireworks every Sunday evening. Admission fee for the entire duration of the fair is one dollar.

    A fair is to open tomorrow evening at St. Michael Archangel Parish in South Chicago. The fair will continue until November 23, with the exception of Fridays. The proceeds will ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 1 c 3, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 24, 1892
    Fair Opened at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish

    A fair at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish was opened to the parishioners and public Saturday evening, October 22, but the festivities did not begin until Sunday.

    The hall of the school building has been gaily dressed for the occasion. The booths containing the lottery wheels are filled with many beautiful prizes, especially with framed pictures of all varieties. One of the corners of the hall is occupied by all kinds of pieces of furniture, which are to be raffled during the course of the fair. Special attention is called to the parlor suite, for it is valued at one hundred and fifty dollars. Among the many pieces are also tables, chairs, sofas, desks, lamps, etc. Every article is attractive to the eye.

    In the gallery an orchestra played while the guests were milling about the 2hall during the entire evening. Many young ladies sold lottery tickets to those present. Two bars have been set up at each end of the hall, and here one can quench his thirst.

    Those that were present were a happy lot. Many had occasion to renew old acquaintances. Many persons formed groups and talked about things old and new. It was interesting to watch this happy crowd.

    Last night offered an opportunity to see several of the leading parishioners of St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, some of the old-timers of the parish, and many Polish businessmen. Without any doubt the attendance at this fair will increase with each passing day. In this way the parishioners will have performed their good deed.

    The fair is open every evening, with the exception of Wednesdays and Fridays.

    3

    On Sunday it opens immediately after vespers.

    From all appearances the fair thus far has been a success. And no wonder, since the proceeds are to go toward the building of a tower for St. Stanislaus Kostka Church. Those who wish to support this noble cause are cordially invited to attend the fair.

    A fair at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish was opened to the parishioners and public Saturday evening, October 22, but the festivities did not begin until Sunday. The hall of the ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 10, 1892
    Concert to Be Given at the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Fair Tonight

    The Nowicki Brothers Orchestra will give a concert this evening at the school hall of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, where a Polish fair is now in progress. The program will be as follows:

    1. March, from "Tannhaeuser" R. Wagner
    2. "Light Cavalry Overture" R. von Suppe
    3. "Thousand and One Nights," Waltz J. Strauss
    4. Excerpts from the Polish opera "Halka" S. Moniuszko
    5. "Poet and Peasant Overture" F. von Suppe

    The public is cordially invited to attend the concert and the fair.

    The Nowicki Brothers Orchestra will give a concert this evening at the school hall of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, where a Polish fair is now in progress. The program will ...

    Polish
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 3, II A 3 b
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 19, 1892
    Local News

    P. Szulc has donated a fine horse to the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Fair. The horse, a stallion named Bency Miller, valued at over two hundred dollars, is to be raffled at the dinner on Thursday, November 24. Raffle tickets cost one dollar and are now on sale. [Translator's note: purpose of the raffle and the dinner was to raise funds for the purchase of the clocks to be installed in the new towers of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Church.]

    P. Szulc has donated a fine horse to the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Fair. The horse, a stallion named Bency Miller, valued at over two hundred dollars, is to be ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 1 c 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 12, 1892
    Financial Report of the St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Fair

    The St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Fair Committee has sent in the following financial report:

    Income:

    Tickets $1001.65
    Raffle books 535.36
    Large raffle wheel[sic] 5098.47
    Young men's raffle wheel[sic] 1636.04
    Young ladies' raffle wheel 1802.27
    Buffets 1680.59
    Restaurant 639.55
    Sale of books by Nuns 560.00
    Dinner tickets 510.00
    Cigar raffle wheel 259.40
    2
    Kitchen[sic] $100.80
    Donations from societies 95.00
    Total $13,920.13 [sic]

    Expenses:

    Prizes for raffle wheels $2784.04
    Drinks 825.83
    Cigars 579.80
    Music 300.00
    Prizes for raffle books 148.00
    Provisions for dinner 98.54
    Groceries and meats 82.76
    Printing (books, tickets, etc.) 71.00
    Sending of telegrams during election day 28.00
    Workers fees during fair 31.45
    Total $4949.42 [sic]
    3
    Gross receipts $13,920.13
    General expenses 4,949.42
    Cash on hand $8,970.71

    From this should be deducted the income from November 17 of the fair, which went towards the Holy Family Orphanage.....$286.73

    The income from the dinner designated for clocks should also be deducted......$422.40

    Total deduction....$719.13

    Balance:

    Income $8970.71
    Deductions 719.13
    Net profit $8261.58
    4

    The net proceeds were set aside for the completion of the towers of St. Stanislaus Kostka Church.

    B. Klarkowski, secretary

    The St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish Fair Committee has sent in the following financial report: Income: <table> <tr> <td>Tickets</td> <td>$1001.65</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Raffle books</td> <td>535.36</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Large raffle wheel[sic]</td> <td>5098.47</td> ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, II D 4, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 02, 1893
    For the Exposition in Chicago

    Warsaw writes: Several photographic establishments are preparing albums of views of the largest industrial plants in Warsaw, Lodz, etc. These albums will be sent to the World's Columbian Exposition in accordance with the instructions received by the industrialists here. Among the most interesting, are the large scale pictures showing the mines and the enormous smelting furnaces in Dabrow and in the vicinity of Sosnowiec. In addition, the ministry of the interior is sending three hundred photographic views of the Bialowies wilderness to the Exposition. These photographs were made by the Warsaw photographers Karoli and Troczewski, with the help of special enlargement apparatuses from Berlin. The photographs were to have been sent out on January 27.

    Warsaw writes: Several photographic establishments are preparing albums of views of the largest industrial plants in Warsaw, Lodz, etc. These albums will be sent to the World's Columbian Exposition in ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 24, 1893
    The Polish Restaurant at the Columbian Exposition

    The Polish restaurant at the World's Columbian Exposition is nearing completion. Located not far from the Fisheries Pavilion on Midway Plaisance, it represents an elegant little hunters' lodge.

    The building will cost ten thousand dollars and will be completed by April 1. Furniture and linen for the restaurant have already been purchased. As is well known, the restaurant is owned by a Polish stock company, whose officers are P. Kiolbassa, president; A. J. Kowalski, vice-president; H. Lubienski, manager; A. Schultz, treasurer; and F. Kwasigroch, secretary.

    Under such management, the restaurant is assured of success.

    The Polish restaurant at the World's Columbian Exposition is nearing completion. Located not far from the Fisheries Pavilion on Midway Plaisance, it represents an elegant little hunters' lodge. The building ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, II A 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 27, 1893
    Participation of Polish-Americans in the Lwow Exposition of 1894.

    Several months ago, we took up the question of Polish-American participation in the 1894 Lwow Exposition in the columns of Dziennik Chicagoski. Our opinion, as already stated then, is that this [Exposition] offers a splendid opportunity for furthering the relations between Polish-Americans and their homeland. These relations have already been improved by such events as Dr. Dunikowski's visit, the publication of the Emigration Review's [published in Lwow, Poland] discussion of our affairs at the attorney's congress, etc. At the time, out remarks were received with ridicule. We have always considered the idea worthy of support, and we waited but for the occasion in which we could again bring the matter before the public.

    That occasion has arrived sooner than we had expected. While the idea of Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition was scoffed at in America, it was accepted not only by the general public in Poland but by the directors of the Exposition themselves as entirely proper and worthy of realization.

    2

    Proof of this is to be found in an official letter to Peter Kiolbassa, City Treasurer of Chicago, from the directors of the Lwow Exposition, and in a very interesting article appearing in the Emigration Review. We present both the letter and the article below.

    "Lwow, January 30, 1893.

    "In view of the prominent position which you occupy among our countrymen across the ocean, we turn to you with a request for co-operation in an important undertaking now in preparation for 1894. Agricultural and industrial circles of our country brought forward the idea of arranging a general exposition on the greatest possible scale, and we have organized with the purpose of putting this thought into action. A fortunate coincidence joins this project with one of our greatest national anniversaries. Next year will mark the passage of a hundred years since our immortal leader, Thaddeus Kosciusko, donned a peasant's coat and raised his sword to strike off the chains that bind us in political slavery, calling the common people of Poland to their duty as citizens--to national defense. This anniversary, important 3in the history of Poland and, first of all, one which cannot be regarded with indifference by Americans, ought to be appropriately celebrated. The unanimous opinion of our people connects the observance of this anniversary with a panorama of the works undertaken for the preservation of Polish nationalism and of external rebirth. It is our desire to achieve in this Exposition such a panoramic view of all the ramifications of Polish life; in the fields of agriculture and industry, in science, the fine arts, literature, and journalism, is the development of public utilities, humanitarian institutions, etc. And by the same token we wish to honor the memory of Kosciusko and urge ourselves onward to greater work toward political rebirth. That such a national spectacle would be incomplete were our brethren across the sea unrepresented, is self-evident.

    "The great distance, and the difficulties and cost of travel will in truth prevent most of our American countrymen from attending the Exposition. It is our earnest desire, however, that the picture of life and work in this new Poland which is developing so successfully across the ocean, should be as complete as possible. We turn, therefore, to you, sir, to ask you to be kind 4enough to disseminate this idea among your fellow Poles and to gain enthusiastic support for this cause. Particularly, we ask that you take the necessary steps toward the realization of a 'Polish-American Pavilion' at our Exposition, in which capable craftsmen, industrialists, inventors, farmers, technicians, etc. may exhibit the products of their labor before their mother country. We believe that the World's Columbian Exposition will be a great help in bringing this about, for articles already exhibited there may be sent on to us. Furthermore, we judge that in spite of the great distance, participation of American exhibitors would not be a matter of indifference to trade. We need but to mention our wicker industry and your machinery to show that reciprocal trade exists between us.

    "We have no doubt, sir, that this matter upon which we have touched will receive your warmest support. We ask that you let us know your opinion on this matter as soon as possible, and let us know also in what form or manner participation of our brethren in the 1894 Exposition at Lwow will be possible."

    Reserving all comment for the present, we ask all other Polish newspapers to 5reprint the above letter.

    We find in the Emigration Review a very interesting article concerning the Lwow Exposition addressed to the Polish-American press. This article points out the need for closer relations between the Polish-Americans and their homeland--and that closer relations are being realized through the medium of Polish-American newspapers sent abroad. It continues:

    "....However, these packages of newspapers, traveling as they do to a great number of places, do not completely acquaint our public with the Poles of North America. Advantage should be taken of the splendid opportunity afforded by the Galician General Exposition at Lwow in 1894. The year 1894 will probably be universally remembered by the Poles. Proofs have accrued by which we can demonstrate to the world what has been accomplished by virtue of our national vitality, after a hundred years, and how insignificant are the results of all efforts to curb it. And these losses, after all, have been the efforts of great powers. The year 1894 will be designated with Kosciusko's name; the figure of 6our leader in his peasant garb will dominate it.

    "Polish authors and newspapermen in Galicia [a province in Poland] have decided that some sort of memorial should be erected to mark the passage of one hundred years of intellectual effort. It is too early to say what this memorial will look like, or of what it will be composed; we can only say with certainty that it will be erected.

    "Another decision in the same spirit has taken more definite shape. It is a projected exhibit of all the Polish, White Russian, and Lithuanian papers in the world, including all the Yiddish, German, and Russian papers published in Poland.

    "The young Polish press in America ought to occupy an important and independent 7place, and there should not be a single contemporary publication lacking. We believe it is not too early for America to begin preparing specimens which will portray the development of Polish journalism in the new world.

    "And so we call upon our brother publishers across the sea to reach, either in a group or individually, an understanding with the Exposition's director of the newspaper section in Lwow. This understanding would include sending information on all the Polish, White Russian, and Lithuanian papers published in the United States, in sending individual specimens to Lwow, and, in general, in setting forth a practical plan for co-operation.

    "The important issue of acquainting European Poles with North American Polish newspapers should not be limited to the Exposition in Lwow. The specimens, instead of being destroyed, or returned at considerable cost, could continue to remain in public view in the hands of the Ossolinski National Institute, an institution created for the preservation of Polish informational sources. We assume also that extra specimens could be provided without great inconvenience to the editors; at the same time, therefore, the Polish library and 8the Polish museum in Chicago could be supplied with specimens of every contemporary Polish publication in America. Undoubtedly, more than one item will be found at the Exposition which our Polish-American visitors will regard as worthy of retaining for their own collections. It is possible that the material and spiritual exchange between us may reach unforeseen proportions. Our unity may attain a strength which we cannot now calculate."

    Our opinion in the matter of Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition has already been stated. We emphasize once more that the principles of the matter have our completest approbation and that we are ready to lend our enthusiastic and unqualified support. Our own suggestions as to methods of its realization we leave for the future.

    Several months ago, we took up the question of Polish-American participation in the 1894 Lwow Exposition in the columns of Dziennik Chicagoski. Our opinion, as already stated then, is that ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, II B 2 d 1, III H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 01, 1893
    Polish-American Participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894 (Editorial)

    In accordance with our promise given to the readers of Dziennik Chicagoski, we return to a discussion of the Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894. We are leaving the article in the Emigration Review on the side for the time being, and turn oar attention to the letter received by Mr. Peter Kiolbassa from the directors of the Exposition.

    The letter, from its text, constitutes a formal invitation of the Poles in America to participate in the Lwow Exposition. The letter justifies our participation by the fact that 1894 is the hundredth anniversary of Kosciuszko's insurrection; that we should use the-results of our peacetime efferts as evidence to outsiders that we continue to exist and that we have a right to exist. On this principle, the directors of the exposition intend 2it to be not merely a display of provincial talent, but instead, a general manifestation involving all provinces of Poland, as far as political conditions will permit, of course.

    American Polonia has already been characteristically christened as the "fourth partition" by people in the old country. It is the least known "partition," if we may call it thus, for it has only recently been discovered by our brethren in Poland. But it attracts wide interest in Galicia and Poznan; it is discussed secretly in Russian Poland. In spite of the increased facilities of communication, in spite of the fact that we seek to acquaint our countrymen in Poland with our activities in many different ways, they still seem to be inaccurately informed. Until not long ago, they were completely unaware of our existence and development; today they probably overrate our strength and significance. If once we accept the premise that Poles living in America ought to retain their nationality, that they are under obligation to their mother country, we must admit that closer relations between American Polonia and its homeland are imperative. These relations ought to begin with mutual understanding. We admit also that occasion for such an understanding is presented by the Lwow Exposition, which, as we see, 3is planned on a broad scale and which will, no doubt, draw numerous visitors from all three divisions of Poland. And so it is quite logical that the directors should turn to American Polonia with a request that we submit examples of our work here to the Exposition. We ought not be unrepresented in this "national exhibition," as the letter describes it, since we consider ourselves a fragment of the Polish nation. And so, we ought to accept the invitation tendered by the directors of the exposition and prepare ourselves for participation in it. This is how the matter presents itself to our minds. We hope, too, that this neighborly viewpoint will be accepted by the Poles in America generally.

    More complicated are the questions: What form will our participation take? Who is to direct it? How large a fund is necessary for this purpose and how shall it be raised?

    While the letter from Lwow presents the matter in a general way, yet it already speaks of a Polish-American pavilion. In our opinion, this desire is a bit too bold. Obviously, the directors of the Exposition cannot be 4accurately informed, and hence they propose a project which presupposes that the Poles in America are able to carry a considerable expense. This is not true. We know well that our people in America are poor people, already weighed down with a great many burdens. Again, our people are almost exclusively workingmen, though a few are engaged in business. There are practically no independent Polish-American manufacturers. We have no industrial specimens to offer, therefore; even craftsmen are rare among us. Thus it can readily be seen that we would have too few specimens of manufacture, handicraft, etc., to necessitate a separate pavilion for their display. In place of this, our exhibit should give our brethren across the ocean a picture of our religious, intellectual, and national life. We build schools and churches, we publish books and newspapers, we organize societies for every conceivable purpose; this is the phase of our existence most interesting to our mother country, and we should strive to create the clearest possible conception of it. Our exhibit might consist of photographs of Polish schools and churches in America, bound volumes of our newspapers, books published here. We might show them the constitutions of our societies, their emblems, brochures, and in some cases, handwritten manuscripts. Such a 5collection would not be difficult to assemble, it could be sent to Poland at low cost, and a place could be found for its display at the Exposition. Best of all, it would give a clear picture of our life here. It may be that this picture would not altogether be complimentary, but at least it would be a truthful one. Obviously, aside from the above-mentioned exhibit, the completion of which would be more or less a public duty, it would be left to the initiative of private individuals, if such willing persons could be found, to supply specimens of industry, handicraft, etc. So much for the form which, in our opinion, our participation in the Lwow Exposition should take.

    The two remaining questions present no serious difficulties. Who shall direct it? Obviously, our newspapers first, and afterward, people of good will and action. Mr. Kiolbassa requested that we publish the letter he received and that all other Polish newspapers reprint it in order to disseminate the idea--to open discussion of the matter in the newspaper column. After it has been thoroughly discussed from all angles, Mr. Kiolbassa will call a mass meeting of Polish-American citizens to talk the matter over. It is practically certain that volunteers will be found to lend their services to 6the cause. This procedure should be followed by other Polish colonies, and eventually a central committee could be formed to take charge.

    Should the exhibit be arranged according to the lines we have proposed, the fund required would be small. The task of raising the money required would be comparatively simple; the fund could be satisfied partly by public donation and partly through the efforts of the individuals and societies most concerned.

    The matter of representation of our newspapers in the Exposition is primarily a question for newspapermen. We will leave its discussion for another time.

    In accordance with our promise given to the readers of Dziennik Chicagoski, we return to a discussion of the Polish-American participation in the Lwow Exposition of 1894. We are leaving ...

    Polish
    III H, II B 1 c 3, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 d 3, II A 3 a, I A 2 a, I B 3 c, II A 2, II D 1, III C, I C, IV