The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- March 13, 1889
    Polish Falcons

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically.

    It is well known, dear fellow men, that the above mentioned society has now and will have the following aims:

    First, to lend a helping hand whenever needed and to live in peace amongst ourselves like brothers. To join with other organizations, like the Polish National Alliance, and by it help to build a Polish hall here in Chicago.

    Second, to produce Polish theatricals, recitals, concerts, etc., as by this alone we shall obstruct the path to evil into which our youth might fall. So for this reason I make a plea to our friends, especially to the Polish youth, to join our Polish-American Falcons' organization, and by working together we will show other nationalities that our Polish mother doesn't 2need to be ashamed of her children.

    So come young and old to our meetings that take place every first Sunday of the month at 2 o'clock in the afternoon in the hall of Mr. Nalepinski, at Noble and Chopin street.

    As to the question of building a Polish hall, it could be accomplished in a short while.

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically. It is well ...

    Polish
    III E, II B 3, III B 2, II E 3, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a
  • Zgoda -- August 14, 1889
    Local News

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an active movement in order to try to secure the holding of this fair in our city. The mayor of our city then selected a committee consisting of the most prominent citizens of the state for this aim, so that they could take care of this matter.

    From among the Poles only two citizens belong to this committee and they are Mr. Peter Kiolbasa and Mr. Zbigniew Brodowski.

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, I F 5, I F 4, IV
  • Zgoda -- August 28, 1889
    American News - World Exposition

    There is no doubt whatsoever that this exposition is to be held here in Chicago in the year 1892, in honor of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus.

    As soon as there occurred an idea of holding a fair for this occasion, there began a scramble among various cities to receive this honor. Especially cities such as Washington, New York and Chicago, but our city showed its quickness and readiness to meet this event with the aid of the representatives of Congress, who will unanimously vote for Chicago. A large committee has already been selected and is composed of the most prominent known people in the state, who immediately went to work energetically on this affair. From among the Poles selected for this committee were citizen Peter Kiolbasa and Zbikniew Brodowski, an editor. Mr. Brodowski first heard about his nomination for the committee from the papers. Probably if he had known of this before he was selected, he would 2perhaps have refused this honor and placed his position upon someone else, because it requires money to work on this committee, as his salary is small working as an editor for a Polish newspaper. But he eventually accepted this position and will do the best he can, because he does not care to prejudice the Polish name in any way.

    There is no doubt whatsoever that this exposition is to be held here in Chicago in the year 1892, in honor of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 23, 1890
    The Chicago World's Fair (Editorial)

    The Chicago World's Fair has so many obstacles that it is not necessary to be a pessimist to consider them a bad omen. As soon as one obstacle is removed and overcome, another will appear unexpectedly. Meanwhile, the time for the opening of the Fair is drawing closer.

    Even now, the President is delaying his invitations to foreign governments, in which he will ask them to take part in the Fair. This hesitation, of 2the President, has created an unfavorable attitude in foreign countries and it was already unfavorable enough since Mc Kinley's Bill became a law. At that time, the European papers openly declared that it would not be profitable to take part in the American exposition, because there will be no market for the goods shown in the United States, on account of the high tariff also at that time, a committee formed in Italy for the purpose of arranging an exhibition of Italian goods at the Chicago Fair, was dissolved because it decided that Italy should not and would not, have any reason for participating in the exposition.

    There are rumors that the governments of other countries are of the same opinion. Mr. Christman, a great diplomat and former American consul to Germany, was asked for his opinion. He replied:

    3

    "I am afraid that the World's Fair, in Chicago, will not have the cooperation of the European nations. The United States will probably have a splendid American exposition, but Europe will stay aloof."

    Incidently, I know that there exists a mutual understanding between Germany, Great Britain, Austria and Italy on to the answer these countries will give, when asked to take part in it. These answers will be very polite but negative. They will excuse themselves by saying that insufficient time has elasped since the Parisian Fair.

    "They will argue that two years is not enough time for a proper preparation; 4but they will be silent about the true cause. The true cause is, of course, Mc Kinley's Tariff bill, or perhaps the way it is enforced as prescribed by Mc Kinley. Some of the paragraphs imply that all European manufacturers are dishonest, without honor; that they are public enemies, almost criminals, and should not be trusted under any circumstances. One of these paragraphs provides that every article imported from Europe must be marked, very plainly, where it came from. For example, on every pair of stockings from Germany, there must be a mark, "Made in Germany." This is very exasperating.

    "There will be many European visitors at the Fair, and even some manufacturers might send their goods, but it is probable that no European government will be represented officially with the exception of Russia. When I was leaving Berlin this matter was definitely settled, "Mr Christman concluded.

    The Chicago World's Fair has so many obstacles that it is not necessary to be a pessimist to consider them a bad omen. As soon as one obstacle is removed ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, II A 2, I J, I E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 06, 1891
    Polish Activities Parish of Saint Stanislaus Kostka Will Hold a Fair

    Tonight at 7:30 P. M. there will be a general meeting of the committees representing the Parish Fair, which will open tomorrow night.

    All persons who were employed at the Fair last year are invited to the meeting. This is in the interest of the parish and for a good purpose, since the proceeds of the Fair will be used for completing the unfinished church tower and for laying a stone sidewalk at the front of the church. We hope that every member of the parish, including boys and girls, will do his share and help a good cause.

    Tonight at 7:30 P. M. there will be a general meeting of the committees representing the Parish Fair, which will open tomorrow night. All persons who were employed at the ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 07, 1891
    Polish Activities Notice [to Members of St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish]

    Dear citizens and members of St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish:

    The Parish Fair will open tonight. The purpose of the Fair is well known to the public. The committees are prepared to meet and accommodate you and your families at the newly furnished parish hall. This will provide a splendid opportunity for wholesome entertainment in the free hours of the evening.

    The Fair will be open every day with the exception of Wednesdays, Fridays, and St. Stanislaus Day, which is a parish holiday. The Fair will also be open on Wednesday, the day before Thanksgiving Day.

    On November 26, that is Thanksgiving Day, there will be a regular Thanksgiving dinner for those who desire it.

    2

    We hope that all members of the parish--men and women, boys and girls--will participate in this Fair. We hope that the idea of the church tower with gold crosses will draw all members of the parish and all Poles in America.

    We hope that the church of St. Stanislaus Kostka will be finished completely, and that our parish will celebrate the twenty-fifth anniversary of its founding and invite all neighbors to the celebration.

    Chicago, Ill., Nov. 6, 1891. Signed (in the name of the Parish Committees): John Kortas, Albert Jedrzejek, John Maca, Paul Ratkowski, Frank Wleklinski, Joseph Paszkiewicz, Theodore Ostrowski, Thaddeus Krolik, Rev. Vincent Barzynski.

    Dear citizens and members of St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish: The Parish Fair will open tonight. The purpose of the Fair is well known to the public. The committees are prepared ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 17, 1891
    Polish Activities the Fair

    The Polish church fair at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish is on. There is much merriment. The people are greatly interested in the contest between Mr. Albert Jedrzejek and Mr. Anthony Sowinski. Today, the Saint Cecilia Society and the Knights of Saint Martin are in charge of the Fair.

    This is the eighth day of the Fair, which will last fifteen days altogether. Mr. John Suwalski will not back out of the contest as was reported.

    The Polish church fair at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish is on. There is much merriment. The people are greatly interested in the contest between Mr. Albert Jedrzejek and Mr. Anthony ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 11, 1892
    Celebration of the Polish Constitution in South Chicago

    South Chicago, where a new group of Poles have settled, had an opportunity to view the loyal patriotism of the Poles when they celebrated the hundred and first anniversary of the constitution of the Third of May last Sunday, May 8. The newly built St. Michael Church, located at 83rd Street, where the prairies reign, was gaily decorated. Special services were arranged for the occasion by the pastor, Reverend Adolph Nowicki.

    Mass services started at 8 o'clock in the morning. On the wall above the altar, a large sign made up of fresh flowers was suspended with these latin words: "Pro Patria." The devout parishioners filled the pews early; St. Michael's Society attended in full regalia, and one of the Orders of the Knights entered the church in full uniform and glittering helmets.

    2

    During the Holy Mass, which was officiated by the Reverend Nowicki, the girls' choir directed by Mr. Wiedemann sang church and national hymns. The pastor took a passage from the Holy Scripture, "Shortly and ye shall not see me, and again shortly and ye shall see me," and used it as a theme for his sermon. He contended that closer ties to the Catholic faith, observance of the services of the Blessed Virgin, the Queen of Poland, and mutual understanding and harmony among ourselves could bring about the freedom of Poland.

    High Mass was also officiated by the pastor at 10 A. M. The Women's Choir sang during the rites. Reverend Nowicki's sermon was about patience and endurance. The better we adjust ourselves to our hardships and bear them with forbearance, the sooner the day of Poland's resurrection will come, he averred.

    "As long as the Polish people were faithful Catholics, they were loyal 3and mighty, but no sooner they turned against the true fold in favor of an allegedly new force they weakened," said the Reverend.

    "The Catholic religion is not afraid of true progress and real culture." At the conclusion of the sermon, he announced that a special May Day celebration was to be held at 2 P. M. He also mentioned that collections for the Polish-Russian Catholics and Kosciuszko's monument would be made.

    After the Mass services, prayers were offered for the fatherland, followed by the Benedictus.

    Soon after the dinner hour, the people began to gather about St. Michael Church to see the parade. Various orders of the Polish Knights had assembled in full uniform, the marshals astride smartly caparisoned horses. Music, played by the bands of several societies, filled the air with national songs.

    4

    At two o'clock sharp, the parade started on its way. Because Retmanskis hall, where the patriotic program was to be held, was nearby, the marching through the neighboring streets was prolonged.

    The following societies of St. Michael's parish participated in the parade: St. Michael's, Knights of the Blessed Virgin, Knights of St. Casimir, and the Sons of Freedom.

    As the marchers neared the Immaculate Conception church, the Knights of John Sobieski III, headed by three marshals, John Koziczynski, W. Przebilenski, and W. Szostakowski, and the latter's 12-year-old son, who acted as an adjutant, fell in line behind the brightly decorated floats.

    The parade took the following course: Commercial Avenue to 92nd Street; 92nd Street to South Chicago Avenue, and then back to 92nd Street; from 592nd Street to Buffalo Avenue; Buffalo Avenue to Superior Street, and from here to R. Retmanski's hall.

    All the homes within the area of the parade were decorated with Polish flags. Flowing banners with white eagles were pleasant to view on this free soil.

    Typical May weather blessed the patriotic occasion. The Irish and the Germans joined the crowd to view this overflowing enthusiasm of patriotism. They also read the triumphant banner, "The 101st Anniversary of the Constitution of Poland," as the float passed by.

    As the parade reached its destination it was realized that Retmanski's hall would not hold the people who had gathered, as it was already partly filled. Those that could not get in, massed about the entrance and windows in the hope of getting a glimpse of the ceremonials.

    6

    The hall was decked out in gay national colors. On the stage two pretty girls dressed in the native costumes of Krakow welcomed the guests.

    Reverend A. Nowicki opened the gala program and called upon the president, W. Pocholski, to take charge. He thanked the audience for their splendid support. Ignac Machnikowski, secretary, was called upon to introduce the choir.

    The church choir, directed by Mr. Wiedemann, sang two beautiful national hymns. After these two numbers, the secretary returned to the rostrum. He spoke about the historical events that led to the formulation of the Constitution of the Third of May, pointing out to the people how they should respect the Constitution of the United States. During the course of the speech, it could be seen that the patriotism of the audience was gaining in intensity at this revival, for every mention of the freedom of Poland was greeted with cheers and applause.

    7

    The choir sang "Third of May." One of the school boys recited a poem, "The Battle of Racwlawice," and the choir sang another national hymn. A twelve-year-old girl recited "This Is What I Call A Polish Girl," a patriotic rendition which pleased the audience greatly. Her sweet words penetrated the hearts of all and left a permanent impression.

    Because Reverend Nowicki gave two sermons in the morning, his turn on the speakers' stand was short and to the point; nevertheless, he showed the audience that he was indefatigable.

    "The aim of patriotic celebrations is the revival of relationships with the Fatherland, together with the fusion of these forces. Therefore, it is the duty of every true patriot to arrange and take part in such occasions. Polish might was the outgrowth of the faith in the Catholic religion, which today again is restoring this power."

    8

    "Years ago the people of Poland warred with the Turks and Tartars; today they are fighting Russia and Germany. The Catholic religion has always pointed out and still is pointing out that honor, understanding, love for thy neighbor, regardless of beliefs and political affiliations, is indispensable," the speaker asserted.

    He warned against liberalism in religion, saying it leads the people away from the Fatherland, which above all should be remembered. This unfortunate patriotic indifference is leading the people to deny their true status, and many call themselves Germans, Prussians or what is worse Russians.

    "National holidays or celebrations," he said, "should always be flowing in the warm hearts of our people, and should never be considered as mere days of entertainment."

    9

    He thanked the enthusiastic audience for their loyal support and begged them to come to a better understanding among themselves, and continue to make arrangements for future affairs, to which he would always be glad to give a helping hand. In conclusion, he asked the people to offer what they could toward the fund for the unfortunate castaways on Russian soil and the Kosciuszko's monument.

    The editors wish to apologize for not being in a position to quote verbatim this truly memorable speech. Unfortunately arrangements for a stenographic copy were not made. The public was generous with their applause for the Reverend.

    Then a gay Polish air was sung by the choir. The ten-year-old son of the president of the affair gave a comic recitation entitled "A Pole Before Hell," which restored the good humor of the audience. Laughter and applause greeted the boy as he made the final bow.

    10

    This initial attempt at commemorating an important Polish event convinced those in attendance that the newly formed parish of St. Michael is one to be reckoned with. It possesses great potentialities in this field. They realize that the organizers of this affair have made a triumphant accomplishment.

    Although the time may be long before another program is planned, those that have attended this one will long cherish it in their memories. This affair will be an incentive to attend others.

    The collection brought $35.13.

    South Chicago, where a new group of Poles have settled, had an opportunity to view the loyal patriotism of the Poles when they celebrated the hundred and first anniversary of ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 1 c 3, III B 3 a, III B 2, III G
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 13, 1892
    The Immigration Home's Problem (A Letter)

    The following letter has been received from Rev. J. Zlotorzynski, secretary of Immigration Home:

    "At the present time there is no greater need among the Polish people in America, and those coming into this country, than the formulation of an institution that will look after the interest of newcomers. The need for such an institution is growing greater every day.

    "My duties as a priest, especially during the Lenten season, have compelled me to set aside the question of the Polish Immigration Home, although it is close to my heart. Now, with the Easter duties at an end, I have taken up this important problem again.

    2

    "Providence has been kind to us, for we were able to set up such a Home in New York City. The generous contributions of our people in America have made this possible. Because of a slump in business conditions, the frequency of the visits to the Home have surpassed the quota for accommodations. The facilities of this Immigration Home are too small. It is impossible to give shelter to all that come here for help. It is a pity that they who have come to the land of plenty, should be turned away.

    "The readers of the press in America are familiar with figures of the ever-increasing influx of immigrants to this country. Yet the contributions for the upkeep of the Home are very meager. Why is this? It is beyond my comprehension! Despite this urgent need, donations for the starving Russians are made by the most mercenary people in America. Offerings for other causes, such as the Kosciuszko Monument Fund, are flowing from all parts of the United States and Canada. But funds for the ever-in-creasing need of the Immigration Home have become a scarcity. Is the 3care of the unfortunate immigrant who is trying to make a niche for himself in the American scheme of things unimportant? Is the drive for the Russians abroad or the monument fund so vastly important? It is true that every person is our brother. But a brother on this soil is more closely related than one abroad, and bread by far exceeds the need for a monument.

    "I, for one, heartily support the unity of the Poles in America, but to build a monument somewhere in a park misses the mark of unity. It would be a greater and more beneficial deed to divert the funds toward the erection of a bigger and better home for the Polish immigrants who seek help. Although the monument will be built at the cost of thousands of dollars, it will never make a great impression to the spectators at the Columbian Exposition. After the termination of the World's Fair, it will be of lesser importance, although it will represent a noble cause.

    4

    "There is nothing radically wrong with statues and obelisks. Many can be erected. But along with them, let there be more concern placed upon the dire wants of the Polish immigrant. As it happens, because of the regulations, many of them are sent back to Europe where conditions are a hundred times worse. These pitiful returns could be averted with the proper means.

    "Therefore, let us make a strong attempt to have the funds gathered in Chicago for the Kosciuszko Monument diverted toward the building of a greater Polish Immigration Home in New York City. This, indeed, will be a pride and a comfort to our people. This will be the salvation of the destitute and a succor to the faithful.

    "Sincerely,

    "Rev. Joseph J. Zlotorzynski,

    Secretary.

    "N. B. It will be greatly appreciated if this letter is repeated in other papers."

    The following letter has been received from Rev. J. Zlotorzynski, secretary of Immigration Home: "At the present time there is no greater need among the Polish people in America, and ...

    Polish
    III G, II B 1 c 3, II D 10, II D 1, II C, I C
  • Zgoda -- August 17, 1892
    World's Columbian Exposition

    The Joint Committee on Ceremonies of the World's Columbian Commission and the World's Columbian Exposition respectfully invites the Polish National Alliance to participate in the grand civic parade to be held in Chicago on the occasion of the dedicatory ceremonies, October 11, 1892.

    The procession will march through the principal streets of Chicago and be reviewed by the President of the United States and his cabinet; the ex-Presidents, members of the Senate and House of Representatives, governors of the states and representatives of foreign governments.

    The Joint Committee desires that this procession shall be one worthy of the occasion, and earnestly solicits your hearty co-operation.

    The Joint Committee on Ceremonies of the World's Columbian Commission and the World's Columbian Exposition respectfully invites the Polish National Alliance to participate in the grand civic parade to be ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3