The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Zgoda -- December 18, 1889
    Local News

    This year's carnival of events among our Polonia is expected to be popular. Many organizations are arranging banquets and thetrical programs. The dramatic circle from the South Side will present a play on New Year's Day, "Women and Hussars," after which amateurs will dance a "Mazurka" in four parts.

    The Central Polish Women's Alliance in America will present a stage play, entitled "The Two Orphans," the first Sunday in January, on the South Side. The play has been translated into Polish by the author of "Three Floras," Miss T. Somolinska.

    We also hear that our carnival singers will be in the concert program. The variety of entertainment will be extraordinary.

    This year's carnival of events among our Polonia is expected to be popular. Many organizations are arranging banquets and thetrical programs. The dramatic circle from the South Side will present ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2
  • Zgoda -- November 23, 1892
    Local News

    Mr. Ksawery Szarwenka, a Pole, made numerous appearances last week at the various concerts held in the Central Music Hall.

    The public was particularly enraptured with Polish music and dances.

    Mr. Ksawery Szarwenka, a Pole, made numerous appearances last week at the various concerts held in the Central Music Hall. The public was particularly enraptured with Polish music and dances.

    Polish
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 25, 1894
    Polish Parish Entertains its Pastor

    Last Saturday, the members of St. John Cantius Parish celebrated the birthday of Reverend John Kasprzycki, the first pastor of that parish.

    At eight o'clock in the evening, while the orchestra played, the pastor was escorted ceremoniously into the hall. Then followed speeches, recitations, and songs in Polish, English, and Latin.

    First we would like to commend J. Brzezinski for the beautiful speech he delivered when the gifts were presented to the pastor. Miss M. Skrzypczak made a short speech in Polish in praise of the pastor, and Miss M. Sikorski addressed him in English. Mrs. Niemiec spoke in the name of the Women's Sodality. After the above had spoken the following boys and girls recited: A. and J. Orzada, J. Wysocki, A. Iwicki, J. Dzierzewski, S. Bendkowski, P. Kielczynski, and Miss M. Kielezynski. A speech in Latin was delivered by A. Bocian, a student. Songs by the parish choir followed. At the end, when the beloved pastor 2expressed his appreciation to the crowd for their kindness, he was literally showered with flowers.

    Many parishioners, men and women, old and young, and even children, were represented at the gathering. The program consisted of twenty-five numbers. The societies presented the pastor with many beautiful gifts, among which was a set of silverware. The Holy Rosary Sodality presented him with a fine set of church vestments, such as are used at the Holy Mass.

    The festival ended with the first play staged by the Dramatic Club from St. John Cantius Parish at the Parish hall.

    The Spanish dance, executed by the young ladies in native costumes, and concluded with a tableau, was beautiful to behold. The cadets made a great hit with their drill. The song "Biaty Orzet" (The White Eagle), sung by the parish choir under the direction of Kwascroch, the organist from St. John Cantius Parish, delighted everyone.

    3

    The play "Chlopi Arystokraci" (Aristocratic Peasants), though difficult to stage, was performed successfully. Mrs. B. Zamiar, who had the role of "Marysia," Mrs. Z. Zonkowka, who had the role of "Katarzyna," and Joseph Walilewski, who portrayed "Stanislaus," played their parts especially well.

    In staging their first play, the members of the Dramatic Club of St. John Cantius Parish showed by their acting that they are clever actors and that, by working with perseverence, they will be able to hold their own with the dramatic clubs of any of the other parishes.

    We must admit that the first play was a great success, but this success was due mainly to S. Zachajkiewicz, who directed the play. Mr. Zachajkiewicz worked hard and spared no pains to make the play a success, and the members of the Bramatic Club at St. John Cantius Parish should be grateful to him for his efforts. However, these amateur players deserve full credit and much praise for their work, zeal, and abilities.

    Last Saturday, the members of St. John Cantius Parish celebrated the birthday of Reverend John Kasprzycki, the first pastor of that parish. At eight o'clock in the evening, while the ...

    Polish
    III C, II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- November 14, 1911
    The Polish Falcons Entertain

    A great many Polish Falcons gathered together for the entertainment arranged by Groups 213 and 266. In spite of the severe cold, there was an enthusiastic parade along Oakley Avenue.....There were 123 Falcons, men and women, in the parade, not counting the Falcon orchestra of Group 192, in full regalia. This was a rather impressive [scene] for an ordinary entertainment by one of the groups. The entertainment was a great success. The group was visited by members of the Polish Falcon's Alliance: Mr. Latuszewsk, Mr. Lokanski and Mr. Ruszczyk. The entertainment included flag exercises, which were performed admirably, by the Falcon women of St. John Cantius Parish. It is too bad that Falcon Zbyszko Cyganiewicz was unable to be present, having an afternoon performance at the Star Theatre on Milwaukee Avenue.

    Even more people were present at the ball given by Group 266 at Cragin, Illinois.....

    2

    The hall was crowded with uniformed [people]; and, to make the entertainment more picturesque, the scenery in the hall was changed every few minutes, transforming the hall into a training camp. Group 192 of St. Hedwig's Parish performed beautiful pyramids [exercises]. A group of ten women Falcons of St. John Cantius' Parish also performed with admirable precision.....

    This valiant group, under the direction of Mr. Gnutkiewicz, was rewarded with a storm of applause for each formation.

    The public viewed with great interest the acrobatics of Members Niziolek and Kielbasa of Group 192. They certainly were worth seeing. These members are true artists, as is attested by the fact that they are constantly being engaged by American theatres.

    In the interval between the gymnastic exhibitions, Mr. John Kikulski, president of the Polish Falcons Union, made a speech to which the audience paid close attention. The ball was alive with true Falcon spirit; and the choir, 3gathered together at the moment from among the guests, thundered out the Falcon anthem, Warszawianka, and pleased the audience by singing softly "Za Niemen het precz".

    Intricate pyramids exercises were performed.....Other exercises were also performed by ten valiant members of Group 192 under the direction of Mr. Budzynski of Circuit II.....It should be added that Group 192 arrived with its president, Mr. Janusz.

    [Editor's note: The omissions represent names of groups of the Falcons or names of individual participants.]

    A great many Polish Falcons gathered together for the entertainment arranged by Groups 213 and 266. In spite of the severe cold, there was an enthusiastic parade along Oakley Avenue.....There ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- October 25, 1913
    Concert for the Benefit of Needy Students

    A concert for the benefit of the needy students of the Polish National Alliance College will be arranged by the Polish Civic Club tomorrow, October 26, at the Polish Women's Alliance hall, 1309 N. Ashland Ave. Many noted talents will participate. Program:

    1. Polish Melodies, by Wronski - Orchestra

    2. Good Night, Ogorkowski - Choir of Dereszke

    3. Piano solo: A Polonaise A. minor, Chopin,

    b. Concert Etude, McDowell - Miss A. Peterson.

    4. Philomena Choir: a. Hymn of Night, Beethoven, b. Mountains of Norway, H. Kieczul.

    5. Trio: a. Serenade, A. Till, b. Romance from L'Eclair, Halvey, song by Mrs. H. Brumlik; violin, Mrs. A. Schmidt; flute, Professor Hugo Brumlik.

    6. Soprano Solo, Aria from opera Halka, Moniuszko - Mrs. S. Hryniewiecki.

    7. Luce, Gall - mixed choir "Lutnia."

    8. Tenor solo, Aria from the opera Haunted Palace, Moniuszko - song by L. Wyszatycki

    2

    9. Violin solo: a. Legend, Wieniawski, b. Barcarole, B. Godard - Miss K. Krenz.

    10. Duet, C. M. Gabussi - by Miss J. Drzewiecka (Soprano) and B. J. Zaleski (baritone)

    11. The girls' choir "Morning Star" - will sing the Flower Girl of Florence, Campani.

    At midnight the famous Polish dance, the Blue Mazur, will be danced by eight pairs of dancers.

    A concert for the benefit of the needy students of the Polish National Alliance College will be arranged by the Polish Civic Club tomorrow, October 26, at the Polish Women's ...

    Polish
    II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2, II B 2 f, II D 1, I A 3
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- May 05, 1917
    Amateur Theatricals

    The St. Cecelia Choral Society last Sunday presented an amateur theatrical performance, together with singing, dancing, and a bazaar. The All Saints' Parish Hall was filled to capacity and many people had to be turned away due to lack of room. The first part of the evening's program consisted of a lively one-act comedy entitled "Slowiczek" (Little Nightingale). In this play, Miss K. Brzezinski in the role of Zosia, the flower girl, displayed unusual talent. She was ably supported by J. Nowak in the role of the gardener.

    In the second part of the program, Miss M. Biba danced a Spanish dance and sang, accompanied by Miss A. Biba. The third part of the program cosisted of two very lively comedies entitled "Zywe Worki" (Live Bags) and "Kichajace Maszyny" (Machines that Sneeze). In the plays the following persons showed ability: Miss M. Singer, in the role of Magda, and Mr. M. Sobaczynski, in the role of Jedrzej the farm owner--although the rest of the cast played rather well. Mr. G. F. Biba, organist of this parish, directed the plays. In a word, the evening 2was a complete success in every respect, and all numbers on the program were applauded enthusiastically.

    At the request of the public, these plays will be repeated at the All Saints' Parish Hall on Sunday May 20, at 7:30 P. M.

    The St. Cecelia Choral Society last Sunday presented an amateur theatrical performance, together with singing, dancing, and a bazaar. The All Saints' Parish Hall was filled to capacity and many ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2, II B 1 a
  • Narod Polski -- April 10, 1918
    Polish Affairs

    Through the efforts of the Women's Association of Commerce of the United States of America, an evening party of 'stars' was held on March 4th in the Chicago Theatre, at 8th and Wabash Avenue.

    One half of the profit from this entertainment was intended for war victims in Poland. In spite of the fact that one half profit was intended for the hungry war victims in Poland and continuous advertising in newspapers, the public did not respond as it was expected.

    The program was very well composed. It opened up with everybody singing the Star Spangled Banner and "God Save Poland." After that Mrs. Florence King, president of the Women's Association of Commerce of the United States of America, spoke, outlining the need of women uniting, so as to carry on the work needed during the present war and help democracy toward a final victory. She also remarked that America is very much 2duty-bound in regard to the Poles, not only for the help during the revolution when America fought for independence, but likewise at present, when the Poles are the most loyal citizens of this country.

    "Poland," said Mrs. King, "is next after Belgium in suffering during the present war and is entitled to be given help. The present war," she said, "will end in victory and Poland will become free and independent."

    Next the Filaret Choir, under the direction of Mr. Rybowiak, sang two compositions of Pastuszek and the "Last Mazur." It also received well earned laurels; the public applauded the singers for a long time.

    After that, Miss Anetta C. Severin, with piano accompaniment by Miss Gardner, sang two English songs: "In Flander's Fields," and "When the Boys Come Home." She sang well. Miss Nettie McPerson, in a Scotch costume, danced a few Scotch dances and played on the bagpipe, a Scotch instrument.

    3

    Next, Mrs. Smulski, accompanied on the piano by Mrs. F. Smietanka, sang the "Wishes of a Girl," by Chopin, and the "Serenade," by Niewiadomski.

    Francesco Daddi, well known opera singer, sang "Serenata Mediovale," and "L'Ultima Canzone."

    Mrs. Zebrowski, accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Czapek, miraculously played on the violin the "Carnival Rousse," by Wieniawski and "The Barcarole," by McMillen.

    The school children, dressed in Cracovian costumes, danced fairly well the "Krakowiak," They were rewarded with applause.

    Next, during a speech by Miss Emily Napieralski, a group of Polish young ladies arranged themselves on the stage in national costumes and the school children in Cracovian costumes. This group presented itself very 4beautifully. The public on the rise of the curtain did not stint any applause.

    Miss Napieralski spoke very well, assuring that the Polish women, just the same as all the Poles, are loyal to America and are ready for all sacrifices for democracy and liberty of the nations. She remarked that the winning of the present war depends on the American women and that it is the duty of women to save and work in order to be victorious, in order to crush the Prussian autocracy and oppression.

    The orchestra under the direction of Frank W. Andrews, played "Polish Flowers," and the march, "Echo from Poland."

    At the conclusion the Dawn and Filaret choirs, under the direction of Mr. Bybowiak, sang the march "Free Poland," by Rybowiak. This march really made a very good impression on the Americans who, being directly enthused with same, did not spare any applause.

    5

    It seemed the applause would never cease.

    At the leaving of the theater the orchestra, under the direction of Frank W. Andrews, played this very same march, and many of the American public remained, so as to hear it again and only when it ended did they leave the theater.

    From the favorable attitude shown by the American audience, it may be judged that our Polish artists gave a splendid performance. The national costumes, in no less degree, were liked. Talks about them could be heard among the public. The ladies in costumes benefited also by selling to the Americans many small flags.

    Through the efforts of the Women's Association of Commerce of the United States of America, an evening party of 'stars' was held on March 4th in the Chicago Theatre, at ...

    Polish
    II D 10, III H, I G, II B 1 a, II B 1 c 2, IV, I K
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 12, 1921
    Polish Welfare Bazaar Opens

    Yesterday, a Christmas welfare bazaar was opened at the Union hall for the widows and orphans of Upper Silesia. The affair is sponsored by district two of the Polish Sokols' Alliance of America. The sponsors were gratified by the large public attendance.

    The festivities were officially opened by Mr. Cieslik, secretary of the organization. Mr. Skibicki, president of Polish Sokols' Alliance, and Mr. Dolbinski, financial secretary, addressed the public. After the introductory speeches, the entertainment program was started.

    The first number on the program was a drill presented by the young boys and girls of the Sokol. This was followed by the singing of the well-known Chopin Choir. Four members of the Sokol danced the mazurka. Another group gave a demonstration on bars.

    2

    Captain Hauke-Grzesika, Dr. Mikolajczyk, and Mr. Konieczny, members of the Upper Silesia delegation, gave short talks about the dire needs of their people. Each presented a part of the historical events leading to the rising in Silesia, and pointed out that although the Polish people of this section were oppressed by the Germans, they did not forget that they were Poles. According to them, when the time arose to defend themselves, they willingly went to the side of Poland.

    A collection was made after the speeches. It brought $218.03. The group Promien, of the Polish National Alliance, added ten dollars to the contributions.

    An orchestra added variety to the program with many Polish numbers. It also played during the drills staged by the Sokol members.

    This bazaar will continue for eight days. Persons who purchase christmas gifts at this bazaar will also make up that part of the donors who will wipe away the tears of many unfortunate people in Upper Silesia. The bazaar committee will continue to make this affair as gay and entertaining as possible.

    Yesterday, a Christmas welfare bazaar was opened at the Union hall for the widows and orphans of Upper Silesia. The affair is sponsored by district two of the Polish Sokols' ...

    Polish
    II D 10, II B 1 c 2, II B 3, III H, I G
  • Dziennik Zjednoczenia -- October 19, 1927
    News from the K. Jasinski School of Music

    Studies in the higher school of music, in all its departments, have reached a top speed tempo. Both the younger and the older orchestra classes, have been taking tests for the past two weeks, under the careful direction of Mr. K. Jasinski. On January 29, 1928 the orchestra which is composed of advanced students only, will give their first concert. Wednesday, October 19, will be the young artists's evening, and is arranged by the welfare circle of the Polish American Veterans Organizations, in the Sons of Freedom hall. The following artists will take part: Mr. Waclaw Malinowski young violinist, student of Mr. K. Jasinski; Miss M. Wvrst ballet dancer, student of Miss Marie Hoyne of the school of Mr. K. Jasinski. The very distinguished member of the faculty, Mr. J. Rankel, baritone, will give his first concert in the beautiful school hall at 1110 Milwaukee Ave. on Sunday Oct. 30, 1927 at 4 p.m.

    Another ballet, and entertainment of great interest to all Poles, is being arranged by the advanced classes, for November 20th; and will be given at the Polish National Alliance hall at 1309 N. Ashland avenue. Admission will be free. Our ballet of last season, which was given at the Pulaski hall, attracted 1000 persons. On Novembr 13, in the school hall at 1110 Milwaukee ave., Mr. M.S. 2Szymczak, will give a lecture on the subject of "Education of our youth and music" Admission free. Mr. K. Jasinski is constantly striving to bring his institution up to the highest standards of teaching, in both music and dramatic.

    Studies in the higher school of music, in all its departments, have reached a top speed tempo. Both the younger and the older orchestra classes, have been taking tests for ...

    Polish
    II B 2 f, II B 1 a, III D, II B 1 c 2, II B 2 g, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1928
    Benefit Ball for Polish Welfare Association Planned [Half-tone--one column--eighth of a page, profile of August Kowalski, treasurer] [Half-tone-one column-eighth of a page, profile of Mrs. C. L. Grabbot]

    Our life is a combination of happy and sad moments, peace and storms, cloudy and sunny days.....

    Following these steps our Polonia is making an effort to remedy the sad and needy circumstances of life in a more pleasant and diplomatic way.

    In this city of ours it is concerned about the tens of thousands of under privileged Polish children and youths, many of whom get their training in the streets without guidance.

    Because of this, not one or two, but hundreds, and at times thousands, of our youth stray from the path of righteousness to pursue the road of evil; as a 2result, they find themselves before the juvenile tribunal.

    It is at that crucial moment that the Polish Welfare Association steps forward like a guardian angel before the face of justice, to protect our youth from the bad effects of law transgression.

    After all this youth is innocent. Such transgressors have had very little training to distinguish good from bad, and when they break a law it is because of the bare necessity of satisfying a necessary and natural want, or because of ignorance. The punishment of such children by incarceration in detention homes means only a training for professional lawbreakers.

    Therefore, the Polish Welfare Association takes the place of the home which is negligent in taking care of the children.

    This work is unusually noble and the more funds are gathered the better will be the care extended to our neglected and abandoned boys and girls, [who are left to their fate.]

    3

    Because of the nature of this work we are certain that all the Polish men and women will greatly support the Polish Welfare Association ball on Wednesday, January 18, at the Stevens Hotel, 8.30 P. M.

    At this ball one can easily find entertainment to his heart's content and mix with people from whom much can be learned. Mrs. Mary Paczynzka, who is at the head of this organization, is president; Anna Chrzanowska acts as secretary; August Kowalski, treasurer of the Northwestern Bank, largest Polish bank, is treasurer. Mrs. Pearl Dyniewicz is chairwoman of the entertainment committee, while Mrs. C. L. Grabbot is chairwoman of the ball. The following will act as assistants: Mmes. H. Bieszke, F. Brandt, M. J. Peska, J. Kowalska, secretary.

    Vocal music will be part of the entertainment. Sylvester Klosowski's orchestra will play for the dancers.

    Our life is a combination of happy and sad moments, peace and storms, cloudy and sunny days..... Following these steps our Polonia is making an effort to remedy the sad ...

    Polish
    II D 1, II B 1 c 2, II E 1, I H