The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Zgoda -- December 18, 1889
    Local News

    This year's carnival of events among our Polonia is expected to be popular. Many organizations are arranging banquets and thetrical programs. The dramatic circle from the South Side will present a play on New Year's Day, "Women and Hussars," after which amateurs will dance a "Mazurka" in four parts.

    The Central Polish Women's Alliance in America will present a stage play, entitled "The Two Orphans," the first Sunday in January, on the South Side. The play has been translated into Polish by the author of "Three Floras," Miss T. Somolinska.

    We also hear that our carnival singers will be in the concert program. The variety of entertainment will be extraordinary.

    This year's carnival of events among our Polonia is expected to be popular. Many organizations are arranging banquets and thetrical programs. The dramatic circle from the South Side will present ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 28, 1891
    Our Amateurish Thearicals

    (From the editors: This communication is published as we received it. However, we like to express our frank opinion by stating that we do not agree with the writer in some particulars. Other readers are invited to write on this subject).

    We must admit that the Polish theatrical movement in our city is very strong, and it is not surprising, because there are hundreds of Poles in Chicago who could give a few scores of amateur plays every year, and each one would draw a large audience.

    Whether these theatricals are of benefit to the public, either by furnishing them recreation, or by uplifting them morally, is a question.

    Very seldom, is there a theatrical performance given without some kind of additional entertainment, such as dancing, drinking etc., and if it 2so happens that such a performance is held without any supplementing feature, the hall is empty. Do you wish to know why?

    For this natural reason we find that a theatrical play alone, performed in the manner as practiced up until now, does not give complete satisfaction. It is true that the most capable persons are selected for this task. It is true that these persons devote much of their time to these plays, frequent rehearsals with great patience, and quite often, after a day of hard work. Yet they do not act well enough to interest the public, because they either do not know their parts well, or cannot be heard. Finally, it appears that they do not understand their roles. At times, they cause laughter at the most tragic moments, and on the other hand, they fail to produce the proper effect at comical scenes. We do not intend to criticize our amateurs unduly, for they endeavor to play their roles as best they can. We should be grateful to them for their gratuitous sacrifice. It is not their fault that they do not play better.

    3

    It is our opinion that a city as large as Chicago ought to have a first-class Polish theater with a personnel capable of giving a performance that would not discredit us in the eyes of the Americans, a performance that would attract the public without any additional entertainments, such as balls or drinking. So far, we have not been able to accomplish this.

    The most important factor needed in our own theatrical work is a suitable hall. As we did not have such hall until now, it was impossible for us to conduct theatrical plays. Fortunately, such a hall is under construction now, and it will be ready for use in a short time. Then we should think of organizing a dramatic club.

    Above all, we need a dramatic club, which would sponsor theatrical plays regularly at specified times.

    It is impossible for such a club to have professional actors. Persons who 4are not young any more, and who work hard, cannot be made good actors. It will be a great accomplishment if they learn their roles well. Such a club can be formed under the direction of our old patriotic organization, Krolowa Korony Polskiej, (Queen of Polish Crown). We are certain that this matter will be taken up at its next meeting.

    Such a club would develop theatrical skill, and supply actors. However, it takes a long time to train a person to become a first class actor.

    In our opinion, it would be best to establish a dramatic school. Such a school ought to be established and maintained by the people of our parish. We are offering some good suggestions: The school should have a limited number of young students of both sexes, whose ages should not exceed fourteen years for the girls, and eighteen years for the boys. The students should possess such innate abilities and qualifications as: well formed bodies, a good knowledge of reading and writing Polish, and especially good vocal organs, adaptable for singing. The moral conduct of pupils should be under a strict control, and the smallest offense 5against morality should be punished by a dismissal from the school.

    The instructions would be given only once a week, on Sundays from 9 to 12 A. M., because we have experienced that evening study does not bring good results. During the first year, the students would be taught, above all, how to speak Polish correctly, how to read and recite poems, prosaic compositions and singing; besides this, the school would give a few easy plays.

    Such a school does not need any endowment, because the students would defray the expenses themselves by giving theatrical plays from time to time, and our citizens would surely support it by such large attendance that the hall could not accommodate them.

    After a few years of hard work, we would probably be able to see a successful, first class, Polish drama, perhaps "Halka," by Moniuszko, which would satisfy the public in every respect.

    (From the editors: This communication is published as we received it. However, we like to express our frank opinion by stating that we do not agree with the writer in ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 f, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 06, 1891
    Poles Will Open a New Hall

    The new Polish hall at St. Stanislaus Parish building is almost completed and will be opened next Sunday at 7:30 P.M.

    This great event will be celebrated with the presentation of a great Polish play, written by W. X. K. Kozlowski, and based on the last Polish insurrection against Russia.

    The play is a tragic drama of difficult execution, but the amateurs who will take part in it are well-known for their ability and we are confident that it will satisfy the public.

    The stage, which is beautifully decorated, has been arranged by stage experts from the Chicago Grand Opera House.

    The scenery on the main curtain is taken from the painting of Elias, and it represents Muscovites shooting at people coming out of a church. The other 2scenes are also very beautiful and artistic. Their perspective is such as to give a perfect impression of distance. This impression is so realistic that many persons have asked why such a big hall has been built in the back of the old one.

    The reserved seats are only 35 cents; others 25 cents; children half the price.

    Remember that this play is presented for the benefit of the parish choir the Polish Cadets, and the Polish Knights.

    Tickets for this play are worth at least a dollar apiece, but the committee desires to have a large audience. Let every one see this play and thus encourage those who devote their time and energy disinterestedly. Remember that the parish choir works not only for the glory of God but also for the honor of the parish and your pleasure.

    The Cadets of Saint Stanislaus work also disinterestedly.

    The Knights have neither income nor privileges of any kind, on the contrary, 3all they have is lots of trouble and expenses. Hurrah! Long live the parish choir! Long live the Cadets! Long live the Knights of the Polish Queen's Crown!

    The new Polish hall at St. Stanislaus Parish building is almost completed and will be opened next Sunday at 7:30 P.M. This great event will be celebrated with the presentation ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II B 1 c 1, III C, III A
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 09, 1891
    Saint Stanislaus Kostka's Polish Hall Opened to the Public

    The opening of the St. Stanislaus parish hall took place last night. This hall, which is very large, is located at the new school building.

    The opening was celebrated with the presentation of an amateur play sponsored by the parish choir with the cooperation of the Knights of the Crown of the Polish Queen.

    The beautiful hall was filled to capacity. Its beauty, of which the Poles should be proud, did not pass unnoticed, and many people from the audience admired its beautiful chandeliers, the curtains, and the decorations. The Poles never before had such a beautiful hall. Its design, its large windows, its magnificent ceiling make the hall beautiful. In addition to its beauty, it has a good heating system and good ventilation. Another feature of importance is the two main stairways and four side-exits for the convenience of the public. The stage is so large that battles could be fought on it. Indeed, this is some thing to see and to admire.

    2

    The play selected for the opening of the hall was "The Polish Insurrection of 1863," a drama which pleased the public immensely. And why not? The actors played the roles of ardent patriots face to face with the hated foes. There were victorious encounters, and loathsome scenes of Russian abuses contrasted with the Poles' lofty examples of true patriotism, true love of their country and self-sacrifice.

    The author of the play did not present the sad end of the insurrection because he feared that it might arouse hatreds. His purpose was to amuse the audience with scenes representing victorious encounters of the Polish patriots with the Russians, and at the same time he desired to convince the audience that the insurrection was justified because it was forced by Russian outrages. The author put great emphasis on the bravery of the insurrectors, who indeed performed heroic deeds wherever they could.

    Our amateurs were so deeply affected by their roles that one could perceive that they felt their actions and thoughts. Deserving special attention was the role of a patriotic Polish mother in whose bosom raged a battle between 3motherhood and patriotism. The mother role was played with deep emotion by Mrs. Pauline Kiolbassa, and the roles of the two daughters by Miss Lessner and Miss Zukowski. All the amateurs were emotionally affected by their roles and played splendidly.

    The insurrectionists were presented as great patriots and the Muscovites not only improve the acting but also make possible the acquisition of better costumes.

    We have noticed that sometimes the actors are handicapped by the behavior of the public, who make so much noise that the actors are forced to speak too loud if they expect to be heard, especially in a hall as large as St. Stanislaus's. Actors are also interrupted by outbursts of laughter at the wrong time. This is done by the young folks who think they know everything and like to criticize. Amateurs should send complimentary tickets to all Polish newspapers and see to it that their critics be provided with good seats.

    The opening of the St. Stanislaus parish hall took place last night. This hall, which is very large, is located at the new school building. The opening was celebrated with ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, III B 2, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 06, 1891
    Polish Activities Polish Amateur Play

    The Polish amateur play produced last night at Walsh's hall on Milwaukee Avenue and Emma Street was a great success. There was a large attendance in spite of the very cold weather which is unusual for this time of the year, and the many political meetings that were being held the same evening.

    The play "Gwiazda Syberyi," (the Star of Siberia) was presented and the amateurs were splendid in their roles. The leading role was played by Miss Helen Sawicki, who gave a distinguished performance. She has great artistic ability and her talent is of great importance to our stage. Every role was well played and the presentation was excellent. Let us have more of them.

    The Polish amateur play produced last night at Walsh's hall on Milwaukee Avenue and Emma Street was a great success. There was a large attendance in spite of the very ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, I K
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 13, 1891
    Polish Activities

    The members of Saint Mary's Sodality staged a play last night in honor of Father Vincent Barzynski's birthday at the new Polish hall on Bradley Street. Before the play Mr. Zagrzebski, the president of the Sodality gave a brief explanation of the delay in the play's production, since it had been scheduled for the fifth of April. [following the speech,] Miss Victoria Mikitynski, praised and congratulated Father Vincent Barzynski in a beautiful Polish birthday song which received a great deal of applause, and then she sang the difficult but beautiful Ave Maria after which the play was presented.

    It was a four-act Polish play entitled Wiara, Nadzieja I Milosc (Faith, Hope and Charity), that described the life of the Polish people and was written by Adam Staszczyk. The amateurs gave their best efforts and the audience which was quite large enjoyed the production.

    In our opinion a Polish theater giving a weekly presentation would be successful.

    The members of Saint Mary's Sodality staged a play last night in honor of Father Vincent Barzynski's birthday at the new Polish hall on Bradley Street. Before the play Mr. ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 01, 1891
    Polish Dramatic Club At St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish

    Judging by its present activities, the newly organized Polish Dramatic Club of the Polish Patriotic Society at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish, will have a greater importance than it seemed at first. we cannot refrain today from expressing our approval of the Club, especially of its management, because we wish to encourage its members to further their work and at the same time urge other settlements and parishes to organize such clubs.

    Staging of theatrical plays is not the only object of the Club. It is rather a school for its members where they are taught not only how to be a good amateur actor, but also other subjects which give them a general education.

    Many dramatic clubs made blunders because its members considered themselves great artists, and were interested in dramatics only now and then. Occasionally, they selected a new play, selected parts, studied them, and staged a 2play. They demanded severe criticism by the newspapers, and if there were any criticisms, even though not severe, they were greatly offended, and threatened to boycott the newspaper.

    Many members of this new Club are well acquainted with the theater because they were affiliated with other dramatic clubs and were considered very good amateurs. This proves that we should enlighten one another.

    The Club has a very ingenious system for realizing its aim. Quite often, perhaps every week, the Club conducts evening gatherings, at which various performances are given, either by individual members or by groups. The program consists of recitations, singing, monologues, monodramas or short comedies. The program also includes an educational lecture, or a very interesting talk on a serious subject. Finally, the Club holds conferences for the benefit of the Club.

    This is a very practical solution of the question of the Dramatic School which 3was taken up by us a few weeks ago. At present, it is impossible to establish such a school because we have no means, and secondly, for the reason that its necessity would not be fully understood. In some measure, the recently organized Dramatic Club is such a school and a very practical one too. In time, the Club may establish such a school as was given in the project.

    The public may attend these evening gatherings of the Club for a very small charge. We are informed that such a gathering will take place next Thursday. We are certain that the attendance will be large.

    Credit should be given to the energetic members of the Club and the management. The public and the members of the Club should be especially grateful to the organizer of the Club, Mr. S. Zahajkiewicz, the present instructor, who directed it into right channels. It was a patriotic act on his part, and he should receive credit, because he devotes his time to it in spite of the 4fact that he has many tasks of his own. The Club will be of great benefit to the parish and the entire Northwest Side.

    Judging by its present activities, the newly organized Polish Dramatic Club of the Polish Patriotic Society at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish, will have a greater importance than it seemed at ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 2 f
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 03, 1891
    Polish Activities

    The Polish Dramatic Club presented "Night Of Humor" last night, at the new Polish Hall to a small audience. It is a pity that the attendance was so small, though a large gathering was not expected because no tickets were sold and the play was not advertised for any length of time, as is the custom before staging big plays. This was done only during the last two days. No special efforts were made because last night's activity was only a trial or a sample of performances which will be staged by the Club in the future.

    Our readers are acquainted with the aim of this club, for we described it in one of our earlier articles. We wish to point out that no one who attended last night's play, "Night of Humor," was disappointed, for every one enjoyed himself immensely, and in this respect, last night's entertainment was a great success. On account of limited space, we cannot describe all the details of last night's program, which consisted of many numbers.

    2

    We wish, however, to state that the following persons contributed to the amusement and enjoyment of the audience: Mr. Czekala, a very popular Polish comedian, entertained the audience with his song, "With the Salt," and with his comical impersonations. He also presented a Polish-English comedy entitled "Misunderstanding"; Mr. Kedziorski, the president of the Club, appeared in the comedy sketch entitled "Mr. Brochocki," in which he played the part of the justice of the peace. He also entertained the audience with songs and monologues in the English language; and Mr. Rosa, who presented "Burg Music," a one-act comedy, greatly amused the audience.

    "The Grandma Katzenjammer," a one-act comedy written by Mr. S. Zachajkiewich only last Saturday, was also presented last night, and proved to be a great success. It brought from the audience outbursts of laughter as never heard before. The following took part: Mr. Kedziorski, Mr. Czekala, Mr. Szajkowski, and Mr. Jozwiakowski, who deserve a great deal of credit and should be complimented, for they tried to outdo one another in performing their comical parts. We should also admire their improvising talent, for to do so would 3be quite appropriate.

    The most important part of the program was comprised of solos and recitations composed by Mr. J. Kedziorski and Mr. Barwig, and recited by Mr. Jozwiakowski. The numbers were interspersed with piano solos. This varied program delighted the audience immensely. We wish to point out that Messrs. Barwig and Kedziorski as singers, and Mr. Jozwiakowski as an elocutionist, have been great favorites of the public for some time. The accompaniment to the songs was played by Mr. A. Kwasigroch. The educational part of the program was a lecture on art, and a short talk by Reverend W. Barzynski, at the end.

    The Polish Dramatic Club will give similar entertainments for their own members once a week, and they intend to give them for the benefit of the public once or twice a month. The ladies did not participate in the "Night of Humor." Will they refuse to patronize the Club in the future? In our opinion, this would be unfair.

    The Polish Dramatic Club presented "Night Of Humor" last night, at the new Polish Hall to a small audience. It is a pity that the attendance was so small, though ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 06, 1891
    Polish Activities Kosciuszko Play on Polish Stage in Chicago

    St. Casimir's Young Men's Society staged an amateur Play last night at the Polish hall on Bradley Street. The audience was large, and it enjoyed a very pleasant pastime.

    Well learned roles, properly arranged scenery; audible, distinctive, and beautiful diction; attractive costumes, and artistic decorations, suitable to the occasion, made a very good impression as a whole, and revealed the theatrical tendencies of the young society. Most of the members of this society are very young, yet for a long time they have proved how fervently they love their native land, how patriotic are their feelings, and also how they strive to remain Poles on American soil. Some of them were born in America, but they do not seek distinction by renouncing their nationality. On the contrary, they are trying to bring honor to their nation by their worthy endeavors.

    2

    It would be impossible to describe all the characters of the Play as presented. The Play, "Four Episodes from the Life of Thaddeus Kosciuszko," depicts the moments in which this great Polish hero had some of the most thrilling experiences, patriotic as well as personal, for during there moments he was associated with the object of his first love, Louise Sosnowski, who later became Princess Lubomirski, and these moments were epochs in his life.

    One of the episodes presented a scene at Sosnowice, Poland, in 1786, when he was obliged to bid his love farewell, for she had submitted to the will of her father, and had agreed to Marry Prince Lubomirski. Kosciuszko, then departed for America for the purpose of taking a part in the war for independence. Another scene presented and incident at Cracow Square, in 1794, where he was greeted as a liberator. He organized an insurrection against Russian domination, and for this purpose he received donations from the nation, and also from the unknown veiled lady, widow Lubomirski, a laurel leaf as a symbol of victory. Then a scene presenting the sublime moment of April 4, 1794, 3after the victory at Raclawice, Poland, when Princess Lubomirski makes herself known to him, and pays a homage to the "Savior of the nation." Finally, a scene presented Kosciuszko in exile at Solotnurn, Switzerland, on the occasion of his birthday. He received good news from his Fatherland about the new hope awakened by Napoleon; also gifts from his countrymen; and where Princess Lubomirski, again, presents to him her two young sons, asking him for his blessing.

    This thrilling meeting of Thaddeus Kosciuszko with Princess Lubomirski, impersonated by John Nering and Frances Bock, was presented to the public by the young amateurs last night with profound respect apropos to a solemn occasion. The leading actors were aided greatly by the members of the society, who participated in the production.

    Several young ladies participated in the Play, and contributed largely to its success. Especially do we mention Miss Frances Bock, who surpassed herself in last night's performance, charming everyone. She deserves the sincere 4acknowledgement and gratitude of all members of the society. We also mention Misses R. Siuda, W. Chlebowski, R. Eukowski, Antoinette Kaczmarek, J. Kowalewski, Anna Nering, K. Kaminski, M. Czerwinsk and M. Siuda.

    We should not overlook here the Polish orchestra which moved the public to almost continuous applause by playing beautiful Polish selections between the acts. This orchestra deserves our support also.

    St. Casimir's Young Men's Society staged an amateur Play last night at the Polish hall on Bradley Street. The audience was large, and it enjoyed a very pleasant pastime. Well ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, III A, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 11, 1891
    Polish Activities

    The Polish Dramatic Club under the auspices of the Polish Patriotic organization held another meeting last Thursday night, at which the members of the club spent a very pleasant evening and profited intellectually. Encouraging good literature, reading poems for the purpose of selecting and memorizing some of them, even if it does not bring any other benefit, is in itself sufficient for congratulating the club sincerely. We are giving a list of persons who took part in last Thursday's activities, although we can not describe all details for lack of space, for which we are very sorry. This list will serve as proof that our youth welcomes good recreation, if it is encouraged and supported.

    The meeting was opened by Miss Olejniczak with a greeting which was characterized by its seriousness and humor. This was followed by a recitation by Mr. Jozwiakowski, which was as usual recited with emotion.

    2

    Next attraction was a beautiful duet sung by Misses Olejniczak and Zukowski. Miss Kwasigroch entertained the public by reciting Mazurka by Ujejski. A boy who was introduced by Mr. Czekala as his sonny, sang--in English--and played his own guitar accompaniment. Miss Gorczynska recited. Miss Chlebowska sang such a gay song that she could not refrain from laughing herself. Mr. Klafta recited "Polewanko" with Mr. Dombek,accompanied by a zither sang a very touching song about the love of a mother. Mr. Zahajkiewic related a humorous anecdote. Miss Zukowska sang a solo. Mr. Zahajkiewic played a certain composition on a zither so beautifully that the thrilled audience, listened breathless with great emotion and compelled him to play another composition. Miss Bock recited "To a Polish Mother" with emotion. Mr. Kondziorski sang in real Cossack style U Nas Inaczej--It is Different in Our Country-- Mr. Czekala entertained the public by his humorous solo appearance, promising to sing a duet next time. Mr. Oszaldowski, Miss Czerwinski, Mr. Dombek, Mr. Anthony Barwik 3again recited. Mr. Kwasigroch related and sang a humorous nocturnal adventure of a knight. Mr. Nahajkiewicz, yielding to the public's demand played the zither again. Several compositions, written by Mr. Zahajkiewicz were selected by the members of the club for that production without the knowledge of the author.

    It was a profitable and pleasant pastime.

    The Polish Dramatic Club under the auspices of the Polish Patriotic organization held another meeting last Thursday night, at which the members of the club spent a very pleasant evening ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 a