The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- August 31, 1892
    Local News

    Mrs. Helena Modrzejewska came to Chicago yesterday. We hasten to inform you that she shall take part, September 4, at the school hall located at Bradley Street, in the role of "Aristocrats." This Sunday she shall perform in a new play,"Queen Hedwig," playing the role of said title.

    The money collected from these performances will be used for some beneficial purpose. But for what purpose it is not known as yet.

    We don't doubt that Mrs. Helena Modrzejewska, who is such a popular Polish actress, will not forget that in Chicago we are accepting funds for the statue of Thadeus Kosciuszko.

    Mrs. Helena Modrzejewska came to Chicago yesterday. We hasten to inform you that she shall take part, September 4, at the school hall located at Bradley Street, in the role ...

    Polish
    II A 3 d 1, II C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- September 12, 1892
    [Miss Modzejewska's Performance Attracts Record Crowd]

    Miss Helen Modzejewska's performance at the Polish Hall attracted so many people that the Hall was filled to capacity for the first time since it was built. The attendance was so large that there was no room in the hall to accommodate all who came, and many had to stand. Had the Hall been twice as large as it actually is, it is doubtful whether all who came to see the great Polish actress would have been seated. It was estimated that from five to six thousand persons had come to see Miss Modzejewska, the outstanding Shakespearian actress of all time. Indeed, it was unfortunate that there was no room for all in the Hall.

    Up to the present time, no Polish performance in America has ever attracted so large a number of ardent theatergoers. It is doubtful whether this record attendance will be duplicated again, at least for some time to come. Even if last Sunday's attendance was not record-breaking, yesterday's was.

    2

    In spite of the rain, the public began to gather early, thus setting a new high in attendance. And who could blame the people for flocking to the hall in such large numbers? Hadn't they all come to see the queen of all Shakespearian actresses--Miss Helen Modzejewska--who was to play the role of Hedwiga, the young Polish queen? Hadn't they all come to acclaim her as their queen?

    Words are not sufficient to describe Miss Modzejewska's performance or to express her dynamic dramatic portrayal. Whatever we might say, it would be but a feeble description of the performance.

    Just as the Poles of old were happy to welcome the Polish Queen Hedwiga during her reign, so were the Poles of today happy to welcome Miss Modzejewska. Her every move and word on the stage was received with awe and, every time the curtain fell at the close of a scene, the audience showed its enthusiasm with thunderous applause. Hundreds of people felt for the first time a genuine national feeling such as they had never felt 3before in their lives.

    It is easier to write about the play than about Miss Modzejewska's performance of the title role. The play in itself expresses the feelings of Hedwiga, a young queen compelled to give up the man she loves by her father, who has made other arrangements for her marriage which will greatly benefit the country and the people. Her father's choice was Ladislaus Jagello, the coarse-looking young Lithuanian prince. The young queen had heard that the prince was a wild man, but when she saw him she realized that all she had heard about him was false.

    The author excels in bringing out the emotions that were harbored in the heart of Hedwiga. To give up her love for Wilhelm would have been to deny herself her only true love--not to marry Jagello would have been to forsake her country and the people over whom she ruled. Her decision was that of a true queen, a queen that Poland has never forgotten.

    4

    Every move, every word, and every feeling was genuinely portrayed by Miss Modzejewska last night. Hedwiga's indescribable emotions--her sympathy and affection, her fears and pride, her duty to the kingdom and her resignation to the sacrifice for her country--could not have been portrayed any better had Queen Hedwiga herself been there in person.

    Miss Helen Modzejewska's supporting cast was made up of local amateur artists. It would be unfair to compare their acting with that of the star performer. Their acting was as different from hers as a lowly peasant is different from a regal queen. It cannot be denied, however, that our amateurs did their best to support Miss H. Modzejewska. Let it be said that they had never played better. This, of course, may be attributed to the inspiration they received from the leading star. All supporting performers were applauded equally for their good work.

    Historical facts relative to this episode were given by Reverend V. Barzynski, who closed his commentaries with the classic story of Hedwiga 5and Jagello before it was presented on the stage.

    Those who saw this performance will never forget it as long as they live. It will be one that will be told over and over again as the years go by, a treasure never to be forgotten.

    Miss Helen Modzejewska's performance at the Polish Hall attracted so many people that the Hall was filled to capacity for the first time since it was built. The attendance was ...

    Polish
    II A 3 d 1, II B 1 c 1, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 13, 1893
    Madame Modrzejewksi's Appearance for the Benefit of St. Mary of Nazareth [High School]

    The date of the promised appearance of our great actress Madame Helen Modrzejewski, for the benefit of St. Mary of Nazareth High School, has been definitely set. She will make her appearance on Sunday, February 22, at the Chicago Opera House, Washington at Clark Street. Madame Modrzejewski's troupe will present the historical drama "Mary Stuart," by Schiller.

    It is expected that the Poles will repay Madame Modrzejewski properly for her noble intentions by attending the performance in great numbers to fete a great actress and praiseworthy philanthropist.

    Tickets for the play may be purchased at St. Mary's starting Monday.

    The date of the promised appearance of our great actress Madame Helen Modrzejewski, for the benefit of St. Mary of Nazareth High School, has been definitely set. She will make ...

    Polish
    I A 2 c, II A 3 d 1, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 23, 1893
    Madame Modrzejewski's Performance

    Yesterday's performance of our talented actress Madame Helen Modrzejewski at the Chicago Opera House proved unusually brilliant. Madame Modrzejewski deserves the honor and esteem which was expressed in the generous applause of the many Poles present at the performance--she deserves it as an artist and as a philanthropist.

    We have previously described in detail Madame Modrzejewski's brilliant interpretation of the title role in "Mary Stuart"; it would be superfluous to repeat these praises. Let it suffice to add that this time our great artist surpassed herself, if such a thing is possible. The emotions of pain, enthusiasm, and satiety which the wonderful performance of our "queen" awakened, were reproduced in the hearts of the audience, giving them the utmost artistic satisfaction.

    2

    The theater was filled. Everywhere Polish faces were to be seen, and between the acts one could hear the Polish language. Although there was a considerable number of outsiders present, none greeted our noble artist with such genuine enthusiasm as we, the Poles. May that applause, which came from our hearts, be her thanks. Madame Modrzejewski's donation is a large one. Our actress not only offered her own services and the services of her troupe, but herself paid the costs of the production as well.

    The Holy Family of Nazareth Academy will receive the entire proceeds of the evening--a little less than a thousand dollars. The result was fortunate beyond all expectations, for which we again praise and honor our noble artist.

    Yesterday's performance of our talented actress Madame Helen Modrzejewski at the Chicago Opera House proved unusually brilliant. Madame Modrzejewski deserves the honor and esteem which was expressed in the generous ...

    Polish
    I A 2 c, II A 3 d 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 06, 1894
    Polish Hospital Proposed for Chicago Play to be Staged to Raise Funds

    Without doubt a Polish hospital is necessary in Chicago, considering the Polish population of one hundred and fifty thousand. Often, however, we hear people remarking, "Why a Polish hospital? I speak the English language. When I get sick I will go to an American hospital."

    In reality, a Polish hospital is not necessary for one who is well acquainted with the English language. It would be considered necessary only by one whose attention was centered upon himself and his own selfish interests. From a Christian and humanitarian point of view, however, it is our duty to help one another if we are able. That which may be unnecessary for one person may prove indispensable and desirable for another.

    One who is able to speak English may have a family which has just arrived from Europe and which does not yet understand the English language. If a member of 2such a family becomes seriously sick and is taken to a hospital of some other nationality where no Polish is spoken, one can imagine such a person's predicament.

    American citizens of other nationalities have their own hospitals even though they do speak English.

    The following incident, which took place on Milwaukee Avenue in Chicago, proves that a Polish hospital is necessary. A grown-up daughter of a Polish restaurant man scalded herself with boiling water so badly that it will take at least three months to cure her. The doctor says that if he treats her at home the cost of the medicine and bandages alone will amount to three hundred dollars, but if she were treated in a Polish hospital--she does not speak English--she would have a better chance of recovery. Moreover, if the hospital charges were a dollar a day the treatment would cost only ninety dollars.

    Thus the cost of hospital care would be far less in a Polish hospital. Moreover 3a patient in a Polish hospital, under the supervision of the Sisters of Nazareth, would be sure of receiving courteous and careful attention.

    Therefore, I appeal to the hearts and convictions of the Poles in Chicago, especially to you fair ladies, who always distinguish yourselves by your tender hearts, and I ask you to support the plan of establishing a Polish hospital, and to support it not only with words but with deeds. All of us should at least attend the amateur play which will be staged at Pulaski Hall, at Ashland Avenue and 17th Street, on April 15, at 7 P.M. The proceeds from this play will be turned over to the Polish Hospital Fund in Chicago.

    A beautiful drama, based on the life of the common people, entitled "The Hut Beyond the Village" (Chata Za Wsia), will be staged by prominent Polish artists from Chicago. There will be a dance after the play.

    I am convinced that our fair Polish ladies would rather enjoy themselves for a few cents at a play than purchase a ribbon or some other ornament which would 4become useless in a short time. Combine pleasure with usefulness, and contribute toward a noble cause.

    Tickets will be on sale at Szwajkart's drug store, on Noble Street; at Xelowski's and Bardonski's drug stores on Milwaukee Ave; at the offices of Zgoda and Gazeta Katolicka, near Noble Street; by the Sisters of Nazareth on Division Street; in St. Hedwig's Parish; at Dr. Strzyzewski's drug store, on Hoyne Avenue; at J. Mirski's drug store, 1093 Hoyne Avenue; at the office of Sztandar on 17th Street; at Mr. Chmielinski's residence, 656 West 17th Street; at Pulaski Hall by Mr. Marcinkowski; at the residences of Mr. Czechowicz and Professor Machnikowski in South Chicago; and, finally, at the ticket office of Columbia Hall on the day of the play.

    George Mirski.

    Without doubt a Polish hospital is necessary in Chicago, considering the Polish population of one hundred and fifty thousand. Often, however, we hear people remarking, "Why a Polish hospital? I ...

    Polish
    II D 3, II A 3 d 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 15, 1897
    Modjeska Stages Benefit Performance at Grand Opera House for Polish Hospital

    Despite the inclement weather a near capacity crowd of Poles, Americans, and people of other nationalities attended the performance of "Mary Stuart," a benefit show staged by Helen Modrzejewska [Mme. Modjeska] for the Polish Hospital, at the Grand Opera House last night. The house would have been sold out, but some of the people misunderstood and thought that the play was going to be performed in Polish.

    The performance was excellent. Our star displayed the acme of acting, which inspired her supporting cast to give their best. Applause was not stinted as the curtain fell at the close of each act.

    After the third act, the queen of the dramatic stage was given a beautiful bouquet of fresh roses trimmed with golden lace, a token of appreciation from the Polish editors of Chicago. Mme. Modjeska also received a floral frame 2with the inscription "Polish Hospital" made of small flowers, above which was a large star made of American beauty roses. The Polish actress was greatly moved by these two gifts.

    At the close of the first act, the Polish editors went backstage by special invitation and exchanged friendly greetings and, above all, thanked her for her kind gesture. They thanked her in the name of the Polish orphans and the Sisters of Nazareth. All regretted her departure when the bell sounded for the curtain to rise for the second act.

    Miss Proctor, who portrayed the role of Elizabeth, received a beautiful bouquet of flowers from the administration of the Polish Hospital at the close of the fourth act.

    This evening Mme. Modjeska is appearing in Shakespeare's immortal drama, "Macbeth"; tomorrow evening in "Camille," and Wednesday in "Mary Stuart." This is her final appearance on the Chicago stage this year.

    Despite the inclement weather a near capacity crowd of Poles, Americans, and people of other nationalities attended the performance of "Mary Stuart," a benefit show staged by Helen Modrzejewska [Mme. ...

    Polish
    II A 3 d 1, II D 3
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 15, 1897
    For Polish Hospital

    Although unable to attend Mme. Modjeska's performance of "Mary Stuart" last night, presented for the benefit of the Polish Hospital, Messrs. Friedlander, Bardonski, and Meclewski have just contributed $3.50 for the Polish Hospital, which amount they left at the office of Dziennik Chicagoski. Thanks.

    Although unable to attend Mme. Modjeska's performance of "Mary Stuart" last night, presented for the benefit of the Polish Hospital, Messrs. Friedlander, Bardonski, and Meclewski have just contributed $3.50 for ...

    Polish
    II D 3, II A 3 d 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 15, 1897
    Modeska's Benefit Performance Nets Over Six Hundred Dollars for Polish Hospital

    The benefit performance of "Mary Stuart," staged at the Grand Opera House last Sunday [November 14] for the Polish Hospital, netted $609.75. This sum was turned over to the administration of the Hospital.

    Sincere thanks are extended to all those who attended this performance, and especially to Mme. Modjeska for making it possible.

    Sisters of Nazareth

    The benefit performance of "Mary Stuart," staged at the Grand Opera House last Sunday [November 14] for the Polish Hospital, netted $609.75. This sum was turned over to the administration ...

    Polish
    II D 3, II A 3 d 1
  • Narod Polski -- November 17, 1897
    Theatrical

    Our brilliant country-woman, Madame Helena Modrzejewska shone in continued triumphs on the stage of the Grand Opera House. Last week she protrayed the title roles in "Camille" and in "Adriene Lecouvreur."

    We do not need to emphasize that she played the roles in a masterly fashion.

    Our country-woman, not only found appreciation and enthusiasm in the numerous audience, but also got favorable ciriticisms in the English language newspapers. Last Sunday, Madame Modrzejewska played, with her entire dramatic company, "Mary Stuart" for the benefit of the Polish Hospital. After the third act the talented Polish actress received two beautiful bouquets of flowers, one from six Polish Editors, and the other from the management of the Polish Hospital.

    After the first act the newspaper editors were all introduced to Madame 2Modrzejewska. Last Monday the first performance of "Macbeth" this season was rendered. Madame Modrzejewska played the role of Lady Macbeth and as usual she played the role with great success. The famous actress will appear next Thursday in "Magda", Friday in "Macbeth", Saturday matinee in "As You Like It" and Saturday evening in "Hamlet", her last appearance in this city.

    Our brilliant country-woman, Madame Helena Modrzejewska shone in continued triumphs on the stage of the Grand Opera House. Last week she protrayed the title roles in "Camille" and in "Adriene ...

    Polish
    II A 3 b, II D 3, II A 3 d 1
  • Narod Polski -- December 20, 1905
    A Beautiful Thought (Editorial)

    A beautiful and good thought has appeared among our Polish people. Thanks to private initiative, deserving of honorable mention, it was resolved to arrange in Chicago under the auspices of the clergy, organizations and press, a great musical and artistic evening in one of the downtown halls, the profits to go toward the fund for our hungry countrymen in that part of Poland, which is within the Russian empire. Joining to make this splendid project a success, the representatives of the clergy, organizations and press assembled last week, and after a thorough deliberation decided to arrange an evening of music in conjunction with a theatrical entertainment in the largest hall in Chicago - the Auditorium (4,000 seating capacity) on January 28th the coming year.

    At the same time an executive committee was elected to make up the program and all the necessary arrangement; at the head of this committee stands the city attorney of Chicago Mr. Smulski, the treasurer is the Most Rev. F. Wojtalewicz, chaplain of the Polish Roman Catholic Union and the secretary is Mr. St. Osada.

    2

    It is proper that we anticipate that a concert and entertainment, into the program of which are to be entered the best productions played by the first class artistic forces, will interest all of us together with our spiritual and civic leaders and that the public will support this beautiful, worthy and noble cause, a cause to help our poor Fatherland and our countrymen suffering misery within it.

    A beautiful and good thought has appeared among our Polish people. Thanks to private initiative, deserving of honorable mention, it was resolved to arrange in Chicago under the auspices of ...

    Polish
    II D 10, III H, IV, III C, II A 3 b, II A 3 d 1