The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- October 31, 1888
    "Why"

    Whoever passes by the streets, in the neighborhood of Milwaukee and Noble Street, must have noticed the Polish business establishments going out of business while others not only stay in business but manage to make nice profits. The Poles, are forced to close their establishments, because they cannot meet their expenses. When you pass some of the stores you will be dragged in by the arms and find yourself in the hands of a Jew and bidding for some article that you may need. But never fear he will meet your price. Many of our Poles, especially the women folks, claim they have saved money by their ability of knowing how to "Jew down".

    Naturally our Polish business men do not use this method, although their prices are not any higher than the Jews, and don't seem to progress in their trade.

    2

    We should be ashamed of ourselves, that we take our hard earned money to the others, instead of to our Polish business man.

    The Jew or German would never aid a Pole, if he were in need, and not one cent would he give for Polish affairs, although from the Poles he manages to secure his wealth. So then for this reason we wish you would patronize your fellow-countryman and not others.

    Whoever passes by the streets, in the neighborhood of Milwaukee and Noble Street, must have noticed the Polish business establishments going out of business while others not only stay in ...

    Polish
    II A 2, I C
  • Zgoda -- September 24, 1890
    Town News

    Last week our reporter visited a picture frame company, owned by operated by a true Pole, Mr. Anthony Sowinski, located near Green St.

    It is without a doubt the largest Polish factory in America. It consists of one hundred fifty-five workers, all Polish. The net profit of this factory is over $200,000 a year.

    Last week our reporter visited a picture frame company, owned by operated by a true Pole, Mr. Anthony Sowinski, located near Green St. It is without a doubt the largest ...

    Polish
    II A 2, I D 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 23, 1890
    The Chicago World's Fair (Editorial)

    The Chicago World's Fair has so many obstacles that it is not necessary to be a pessimist to consider them a bad omen. As soon as one obstacle is removed and overcome, another will appear unexpectedly. Meanwhile, the time for the opening of the Fair is drawing closer.

    Even now, the President is delaying his invitations to foreign governments, in which he will ask them to take part in the Fair. This hesitation, of 2the President, has created an unfavorable attitude in foreign countries and it was already unfavorable enough since Mc Kinley's Bill became a law. At that time, the European papers openly declared that it would not be profitable to take part in the American exposition, because there will be no market for the goods shown in the United States, on account of the high tariff also at that time, a committee formed in Italy for the purpose of arranging an exhibition of Italian goods at the Chicago Fair, was dissolved because it decided that Italy should not and would not, have any reason for participating in the exposition.

    There are rumors that the governments of other countries are of the same opinion. Mr. Christman, a great diplomat and former American consul to Germany, was asked for his opinion. He replied:

    3

    "I am afraid that the World's Fair, in Chicago, will not have the cooperation of the European nations. The United States will probably have a splendid American exposition, but Europe will stay aloof."

    Incidently, I know that there exists a mutual understanding between Germany, Great Britain, Austria and Italy on to the answer these countries will give, when asked to take part in it. These answers will be very polite but negative. They will excuse themselves by saying that insufficient time has elasped since the Parisian Fair.

    "They will argue that two years is not enough time for a proper preparation; 4but they will be silent about the true cause. The true cause is, of course, Mc Kinley's Tariff bill, or perhaps the way it is enforced as prescribed by Mc Kinley. Some of the paragraphs imply that all European manufacturers are dishonest, without honor; that they are public enemies, almost criminals, and should not be trusted under any circumstances. One of these paragraphs provides that every article imported from Europe must be marked, very plainly, where it came from. For example, on every pair of stockings from Germany, there must be a mark, "Made in Germany." This is very exasperating.

    "There will be many European visitors at the Fair, and even some manufacturers might send their goods, but it is probable that no European government will be represented officially with the exception of Russia. When I was leaving Berlin this matter was definitely settled, "Mr Christman concluded.

    The Chicago World's Fair has so many obstacles that it is not necessary to be a pessimist to consider them a bad omen. As soon as one obstacle is removed ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, II A 2, I J, I E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 24, 1890
    A New Guest at Christmas Eve Supper (Editorial)

    This year, at the Christmas Eve supper, when Polish families, especially in Chicago, will be gathered at their tables for the traditional custom of breaking and partaking of the wafer, a new guest will be present. This young guest that loves all Poles sincerely, and brings best wishes into the homes, is Dziennik Chicagoski.

    "Glory be to God in the Highest and Peace to All People of Good Will."

    This new guest, dear readers, desires to bring, peace, good will, harmony, 2and mutual love into your homes. This new guest desires to be your meditator, welcomed everywhere and by everybody. It desires to remove disagreements and bring understanding among you, to give you an opportunity to know yourselves better. It desires to enlighten you on important matters, to reconcile you, and to establish brotherly love among you.

    We know positively that you will not refuse this guest, that you will welcome it on that day; we have proofs of it in spite of the short existence of our journal.

    Please accept our best wishes. May God bless all your endeavors, lighten your burdens, alleviate your sufferings, and prolong your happiness.

    3

    We also hope that you live to be a hundred years old, own your homes and reap a harvest of gold.

    Tomorrow is Christmas Day, one of the most important holy days of the year. We will observe it. All will have a holiday tomorrow, the whole world has a holiday; therefore, no one will accuse us of wrong doing if we desire to observe solemnly such a holiday. In order to supply our subscribers with something to read, in case they have any time left for that purpose, we are mailing "Wiara I Ojczyzna" (Faith and Motherland) early enough so that they receive it on that day.

    We remarked in the editorial columns of our journal, a few days ago that other 4newspapers ignored us but since that time favorable comments have appeared in several newspapers, therefore, we thank our colleagues very kindly and wish them a Merry Christmas.

    This year, at the Christmas Eve supper, when Polish families, especially in Chicago, will be gathered at their tables for the traditional custom of breaking and partaking of the wafer, ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, III B 3 b, II A 2, I B 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 28, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago The Pulaski Fire Insurance Company

    Let no one get the best of us! Poles in Chicago are organizing a Polish fire insurance company, the shares of which will be sold only to Poles. This action is a protest against German and Jewish organizations that take away money from the Poles by charging them high premiums for fire insurance.

    For this reason, citizens A. Kowalski, W. Jendrzejek, E. H. Bessa, A. J. Kwesigroch, A. Schultz, Joseph Schroeder, Jan Mantz, Jankowski, Frank Mantz, J. Suwalski, J. Jakubowski, B. Badura, and E. Wisinski, secured a permit from the State of Illinois for selling shares at $100 each.

    The initial payment on a share is only $5. Other payments are arranged by the management. Shares are sold at the office of the secretary, Mr. A. J. Kwasigroch, 163 Blackhawk St., or at the meeting on Monday, March 2, at Mr. A. Schultz's, 679 Noble Street.

    2

    A number of shares has been sold already, besides those bought by the directors. Therefore, we invite our countrymen to buy shares as soon as possible.

    Whoever buys a share in March or in April, will still get 6% interest.

    A. J. Kwasigroch,

    Secretary.

    Let no one get the best of us! Poles in Chicago are organizing a Polish fire insurance company, the shares of which will be sold only to Poles. This action ...

    Polish
    III A, II A 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 19, 1891
    New Polish Building and Loan Association Organized

    The Fifteenth Ward Building and Loan Association, organized on June 8, 1891, will hold its third meeting at Mr. Joseph Kowaczek's Hall, 1025 North Hoyne Avenue on June 22 at 7:30 P. M. We wish to inform the public that our association is still in the process of organization. At present, we are not accepting any money, but new members. This will not be a small organization of ten or fifteen members. We desire to have a large gathering at which we will discuss ways and means of organizing a building and loan association, and elect qualified persons for officers of the association.

    At present, we have two temporary officials: John Lewandowski, president, and Constantine Swiatkowski, secretary. As soon as we have a thousand members the association will be legally organized. Then the members will pay their dues which will be twelve and a half cents on one share. We 2will then have a right to elect regular officials. This rule was made at the last meeting. We have applicants already for 316 shares. Brothers please do not delay, for we need such an Association at St. Hedwig's Parish.

    Let us take a look at St. Stanislaus Kostka's Parish. In that parish, there are many building and loan associations, and every one is in a fine condition. Our parish is so large that we could have two or three of them, yet we have none.

    Let us all gather at the above mentioned hall on Monday, June 22, and we will be convinced that it is easier to help one another than to pay a large rate of interest and nice premiums to downtown rich banks.

    In the name of the committee

    Constantine Swiatkowski, Secretary,

    1057 Dudley Street.

    The Fifteenth Ward Building and Loan Association, organized on June 8, 1891, will hold its third meeting at Mr. Joseph Kowaczek's Hall, 1025 North Hoyne Avenue on June 22 at ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II A 2, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- October 10, 1891
    A New Polish Settlement Sobieski Park (Adv.)

    Anyone recalling how the new Polish settlement, called Sobieski Park [now Calumet Park], looked half a year ago must admit, were he to look at it today, that great improvements have taken place in it since then.

    When people began to buy lots in this subdivision some time ago, the place was still a wood, and its future was rather doubtful. Today it looks entirely different. We wish to call your attention to all the improvements in this locality.

    In the first place, we wish to point out that almost all lots on this subdivision have been sold. All trees have been cut down and removed. The streets have 2been cleared and sidewalks laid. Several settlers have built beautiful residences and the most important achievement is the new Polish Catholic church, which is almost finished. Buy now before prices go up.

    For further information apply to Brooks & Co., 803 Takoma Bldg., Chicago. Agents: J. R. Niemczewski, Thirty-first and Main (sic) Street; Adam Stachowicz, 45 Sloan (sic) Street; A. Majewski, 664 Noble Street; B. Prominski, 831 Wood Street; L. Groszkiewicz, 143 W. Division Street; Joseph Napieralski, 681 W. 17th Street; John Rozynek, South Chicago; Max Baranski and John Adamowski, 525 Noble Street; A. J. Kowalski, 617 Noble Street; Joseph Mrukowski, 660 Dickson Street; Peter Arkuszewski, corner Fry and Noble Streets.

    Anyone recalling how the new Polish settlement, called Sobieski Park [now Calumet Park], looked half a year ago must admit, were he to look at it today, that great improvements ...

    Polish
    II F, II A 2, III A
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 19, 1892
    Milwaukee Avenue State Bank Adds Three Polish Directors under New Administration

    At a special meeting of stock-holders of the Milwaukee Avenue State Bank, three Polish directors were added yesterday. This session also brought about an entirely new policy of this well-known banking institution of the near northwest side.

    The Polish directors are: John Schermann, N.A. La Buy, and John Smulski. This has brought the total number of directors to twelve. The others are as follows: John P. Hanson, F. H. Herhold, William Johnson, A. C. Lausten, John McClaren, Thos. G. Morris, Paul O. Stensland, and Soren D. Thorson.

    Officers of the bank are: Paul O. Stensland, president; Andrew C. Lausten, 2vice president; Chas. E. Schlytern, cashier; and Donald L. Morrill, counsel.

    The Poles are well represented in the stockholding group. Out of forty-nine stockholders, sixteen of them are Polish, namely; Victor Bardonski, Max A. Drezmal, Anthony Groenwaldt, Albert Jendzejek, Peter Kiolbassa, Joseph Kowalski, Miss A. La Buy, M. A. La Buy, I. P. Mikitynski, P. P. Okoniewski, Julian Pischke, John Schermann, Stanislaw Slominski, John F. Smulski, Frank Wleklinski, and John H. Xelowski.

    This bank was formerly a private concern, under the direction of Paul O. Stensland and company. It has become well-known to the Poles of this section of town. Many of them have been doing business here for years.

    3

    The Milwaukee Avenue State bank is located at Milwaukee Avenue and Carpenter Street.

    At a special meeting of stock-holders of the Milwaukee Avenue State Bank, three Polish directors were added yesterday. This session also brought about an entirely new policy of this well-known ...

    Polish
    II A 2, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 19, 1892
    Polish-American Publishing Association (Advertisement)

    The Polish-American Printing Association, equipped with the latest printing machinery and system, using skilled labor, is qualified to do various kinds of publishing with the least possible cost and in the shortest time.

    It specializes in doing printing work for Polish societies in the Polish, German, English, and other languages.

    Jubilee books, annuals, and various other books and pamphlets are printed at reasonable rates. Those desiring any work to be done in 2this field will get prompt attention if they communicate with the office of Faith and Nationality, 141-143 West Division Street, in person or by mail.

    The Polish-American Printing Association, equipped with the latest printing machinery and system, using skilled labor, is qualified to do various kinds of publishing with the least possible cost and in ...

    Polish
    II A 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 04, 1892
    Building Permit

    A building permit was granted to John Nowacki to build a two-story frame store and flat building at 8305 Superior Avenue. The building will cost $3,000.

    A building permit was granted to John Nowacki to build a two-story frame store and flat building at 8305 Superior Avenue. The building will cost $3,000.

    Polish
    II F, II A 2