The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- December 05, 1888
    Organization of Mieczystaw

    A newly organized club of National Polish Artisans of King Mieczystaw I held its meeting the 18th of November at the hall of Mr. Albert Kowalski, on the corner of Noble Street and Milwaukee Avenue.

    At first they read the constitution, its aims, and the future of this newly organized club, and then they invited the president of the N. P. A., Mr. Osucha, to be their speaker.

    Mr. Osucha, taking the stand, expressed his gratification that brothers joining the new organization understood its qualities, its merits, and the importance of it to the Polish National Alliance, and so every one expressed the feeling of readiness in joining this alliance.

    The National Alliance, he said, labors for the nation and so expressed itself in its constitution. Under the banner of the organization we can work without fear. Our work is open and so our aim to be larger and better needs your support. Here in America we have freedom, and so for this reason we should take advantage of it by giving our nation the greatest support.

    A newly organized club of National Polish Artisans of King Mieczystaw I held its meeting the 18th of November at the hall of Mr. Albert Kowalski, on the corner of ...

    Polish
    III B 2, II A 1
  • Zgoda -- June 19, 1889
    A New Polish Lawyer

    We are informed that our young Polish comrade, Maksymilian Drzymata, has passed his examinations at the University, qualifying him for a lawyer's degree.

    He is the same person who, at the last celebration of the anniversary of May the 3rd, orated in English about the Polish foreign relations during the dismemberment of Poland.

    We are informed that our young Polish comrade, Maksymilian Drzymata, has passed his examinations at the University, qualifying him for a lawyer's degree. He is the same person who, at ...

    Polish
    II A 1, IV
  • Zgoda -- February 12, 1890
    [Many Poles Die from Influenza]

    Many of the dead in the Central states from the epidemic of influenza which carried off twelve hundred and eight people in Chicago alone between December 23, 1889 and February 1, 1890, were Polish, according to a statement of Dr. Xelowski, a member of the Board of Health.

    Many of the dead in the Central states from the epidemic of influenza which carried off twelve hundred and eight people in Chicago alone between December 23, 1889 and February ...

    Polish
    I M, IV, II A 1
  • Zgoda -- April 02, 1890
    City News

    Wednesday afternoon, April 2, Frances Ekowski received at the Auditorium from the Dental and Surgery College his doctor's degree. We are happy to state that of the 29 graduating students, Mr. Ekowski had the second highest average.

    The ceremony was a series of talks by professors, and many songs were sung and played by the school orchestra, Mr. Ekowski gave the farewell speech, which was the main topic of the evening. He emphasized that the graduates should not forget that they are now entering the business world to heal and bring to normal health sufferers from different kinds of sicknesses.

    Wednesday afternoon, April 2, Frances Ekowski received at the Auditorium from the Dental and Surgery College his doctor's degree. We are happy to state that of the 29 graduating students, ...

    Polish
    II A 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- July 01, 1891
    Poles at Jesuits College

    We received the official report of Jesuits College for the year of 1890-91, from, which we are quoting the following, and correcting the last particulars, which appeared in our journal concerning Polish students attending that institution.

    The following fraternities established at that college and supervised by its professors have Poles among its offices:

    The Chrysostamian Debating Society

    The purpose of this association is to study literature and elocution. In that fraternity, the second censor of the second year is John G. Bednarek.

    The Students' library Association

    This library was founded to promote good literature. Already, it has two 2thousand volumes. One of the censors of that association is John G. Bednarek.

    The Athletic and Game Room Association has John G. Bednarek'as its censor also.

    Last year, the college gave a few theatrical plays, and some of the actors were Polish students. On February 5, 1890, a play depicting a historical tragedy entitled "The Black Knight" was given by that institution which was staged at the Grand Opera House. In that production, John G. Bednarek played a very important role.

    On November 24, 1890, "the first Academic" of that school staged a production entitled "A Trip to Greece with Nepos as Our Guide." The invitation was recited by John Jendrzejak.

    On November 28, 1890, a production "The Greeks Visit the Romans, A.D. 170," at which J. S. Schultz played a piano solo and piano duet with another pianist.

    3

    The following Poles attended this college:

    Bednarek, John G. Subject Poetry

    Cholewinski, Stan. P. Preparatory

    Jendrzejewski, John G. First Academic

    Klosowski, Edward A. Third Academic

    Kowalewski, Edward A. Third Academic

    Nawrocki, Anthony S. Third Academic

    Politowski, August A. Third Academic

    Schultz, Stephen J. Second Academic

    Szulerski, Albert G. Third Academic

    Zalewski, Ambrose M. Third Academic

    The following awards were presented to the Polish students at the end of the school year: John G. Bednarek received a gold watch as the first award for the best Latin composition. John G. Jendrzejek, was especially distinguished for the best marks in Latin (in all courses) as the first after the one who was awarded with a gold watch. The same John G. Jendrzejek was also distinguished for the best marks in mathematics.

    4

    The following Polish students received book awards: John G. Bednarek, second award for Latin, Greek, and mathematics; he also received honorable mention for history and chemistry.

    Stephen J. Schultz, honorable mention for Greek, and a first award for penmanship.

    August A. Politowski received honorable mention for religion and Latin, second award for English, history, geography, and orthography, and first award for arithmetic and penmanship.

    Anthony S. Nawrocki, first award for Latin, and honorable mention for penmanship.

    Edward A. Kowalewski, honorable mention for religion.

    Ambrose M. Zalewski, honorable mention for penmanship.

    Besides these, honorable mention was given to Anthony Nawrocki and Aug. Politowski, for the German language as extra curricular.

    5

    The following Polish students received honorable mention for extra good behavior: John G. Bednarek, St. P. Cholewinski, John G. Jendrzejek, Ed. A. Kowalewski, Anthony S. Nawrocki, Aug. A. Politowski, Stephen I. Schultz, and Albert G. Szulerski.

    Polish students also distinguished themselves by high marks. It is understood that one hundred is the highest mark, but no one has ever received it at that college.

    John G. Bednarek--91

    Stan. P. Cholewinski--93

    John G. Jendrzejek--99

    Edw. A. Kowalewski--88

    Anthony S. Nawrocki--80

    Aug. A. Politowski--99

    We received the official report of Jesuits College for the year of 1890-91, from, which we are quoting the following, and correcting the last particulars, which appeared in our journal ...

    Polish
    II A 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 24, 1894
    Polish Physician Dies

    Dr. Casimir Rewkowski, a distinguished and well-known Polish physician in Chicago, died last night at ten o'clock. While sitting on a chair, in the course of a professional call at 253 West North Avenue, he suddenly collapsed and died, probably from a heart attack. His body was taken to an undertaker's establishment, and today a coroner's jury will decide what was the cause of his sudden death.

    The late Dr. Casimir Rewkowski was about fifty years old and came from Lithuania. After first serving in the Russian army, he finished his medical training at Saint Petersburg University, serving later as army physician during the RussoTurkish War of 1877-1878. Later on he served as county physician in Bilgoraj, Russia. He came to America nine years ago and settled in Chicago. The deceased was not married, and his only relatives are a brother and a sister in Europe.

    Doctor Rewkowski, who was well-to-do, made his money in America. Although he 2had only eighty dollars in cash when he died, it is said that his savings, invested in real-estate mortgages, properties, and shares, amount to more than ten thousand dollars. He was planning to leave America for Europe.

    The late Dr. Casimir Rewkowski was a member of the Polish National Alliance group Harmonia and a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, Saint Stanislaus Council. He was always willing to help his friends. His sudden death was keenly felt by his patients and friends.

    Dr. Casimir Rewkowski, a distinguished and well-known Polish physician in Chicago, died last night at ten o'clock. While sitting on a chair, in the course of a professional call at ...

    Polish
    II A 1, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 02, 1895
    Let Us Strive Toward Higher Education

    Every broad-minded person will admit the fact that there is a lack of an intellectual group among Polish-American citizenry. There are individual cases, that is true, but these do not comprise an intellectual class.

    The fire and desire for education among our Polish youth in America is lacking to an extent that it is hardly believable. In America, where the ambition of youth does not stop after securing a degree, our Polish youth can barely muster enough energy to prepare for First Holy Communion [Translator's note: During this period (1890's) a child had to be in the higher grade of the elementary school and at least twelve years of age before he could get his First Holy Communion. This, of course, has reference to the Polish parochial schools].

    In all the twelve free public high schools of the city of Chicago it is doubtful 2whether there are more than ten Polish teachers. During the past three years only one Polish young man, Mr. Jezierny, and one Polish young lady, Miss Frances Mikitynska, received diplomas in these schools. There also are about ten Polish students at the Jesuit High School, but a part of this number is enrolled in the business course and not the general course.

    On the list of public school teachers in Chicago for 1892-93 only three Polish names were found, namely, Anna Drezmal [also Drzemala], Wanda Ladynska, and Otylia Mikulska. The latter two were teachers of German and had received their training abroad. Miss Mikitynska was appointed a teacher last year. This small number is the entire representation of the Polish people of Chicago, whose number is the largest in America.

    There is a mere handful of Polish students in universities and other institutions of learning.

    3

    At the University of Chicago there are at present four students bearing typical Polish names: Lipski, Witkowski, Pienkowski, and Jarzebski, but only the last named is a Pole; Witkowski and Lipski are Jewish. Pienkowski, although of Polish descent, does not know a word of Polish.

    Northwestern University has two Polish students, a young man who is training for a pharmacist and Miss Dowiatowna, who is studying medicine.

    Mr. Klosowski is the only Pole attending the University of Illinois at the present time.

    In the other technical and professional institutions of Chicago the following names are found: Messrs. Sawicki and Zurawski, who attend classes at a technical school, and Mr. Kuflewski, who is studying medicine.

    4

    Six of the above-mentioned students completed their training in the "Gymnasium" or high school, in Europe and not in America.

    It is very sad indeed to have such a meager representation in our higher institutions of learning, because the Poles number over 50,000 in Chicago.

    These facts are given because I have often become saddened by them and because my greatest desire is to see the Poles take greater advantage of the educational opportunities offered in Chicago. Would to God that this appeal would only urge one Pole to have his children receive the benefits of higher education.

    Every broad-minded person will admit the fact that there is a lack of an intellectual group among Polish-American citizenry. There are individual cases, that is true, but these do not ...

    Polish
    I A 1 a, II A 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 22, 1895
    Dr. Kaczorowski Appolnted Inspector of Health of South Chicago

    Dr. [?] Kaczorowski has been appointed Health Inspector of South Chicago by the Mayor of Chicago.

    Free small-pox vaccination will be given daily between 8 A. M. and 9 A. M., between 7 P. M. and 9 P. M., at Dr. Kaczorowski's residence, 8361 Superior Avenue, corner 84th Street.

    From 10 A. M. to 12 noon, and from 5 P. M. to 7 P. M., vaccinations will be given at the Polish Medical Center, 8816 Commercial Avenue.

    All Polish residents of the South Chicago area ought to take advantage of this free medical service. By being vaccinated against smallpox one not only protects himself but his family from unforeseen dangers.

    Dr. [?] Kaczorowski has been appointed Health Inspector of South Chicago by the Mayor of Chicago. Free small-pox vaccination will be given daily between 8 A. M. and 9 A. ...

    Polish
    II A 1, II D 3, I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 15, 1895
    Polish Doctor Given City Post

    Dr. Garrot, chief medical inspector of Chicago, has assigned Dr. C. Czerniewski, 699 Noble Street, to his staff. Dr. Czorniewski will give free inoculations against small-pox daily from 7 P. M. to 9 P. M., and from 2 P. M. to 5 P. M. on Sundays.

    All Poles should take advantage of this free medical service.

    Dr. Garrot, chief medical inspector of Chicago, has assigned Dr. C. Czerniewski, 699 Noble Street, to his staff. Dr. Czorniewski will give free inoculations against small-pox daily from 7 P. ...

    Polish
    II A 1, I M
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 04, 1895
    Local Polish Activities

    F. P. Danisch has recently opened a notary public office at 733 Van Horn Street, in St. Adalbert Parish.

    Two young Polish attorneys, M. Drzemala and John F. Smulski, have formed a partnership, and have opened offices in the Metropolitan Block, Randolph and La Salle Streets.

    F. P. Danisch has recently opened a notary public office at 733 Van Horn Street, in St. Adalbert Parish. Two young Polish attorneys, M. Drzemala and John F. Smulski, have ...

    Polish
    II A 1, IV