The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- August 14, 1889
    Local News

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an active movement in order to try to secure the holding of this fair in our city. The mayor of our city then selected a committee consisting of the most prominent citizens of the state for this aim, so that they could take care of this matter.

    From among the Poles only two citizens belong to this committee and they are Mr. Peter Kiolbasa and Mr. Zbigniew Brodowski.

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, I F 5, I F 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 29, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    A great political massmeeting took place last night at Andrew Schultz's hall, 697 Noble Street. The meeting was a very important one in that it was called to name a committee for the 16th Ward Democratic political organization. Elected for this committee were Mr. John Arkuszewski, president; Victor Bardonski, vice-president; and J. Kendziorski, secretary. An executive committee was also formed of which the following persons were elected members: John Czekata, E. Z. Brodowski, M. Michalski, Frank Murkowski, Joseph Pytlak, W. Tomasik, and John Biniak. Mr. Peter Kiolbasa was picked out as candidate for alderman of the ward. Mr. Kiolbasa, we think, will get all the votes of the Poles and also many votes from other groups, because his ability and righteousness are well known not only to the Poles but also, to the Americans and the Germans. The committee will have its meeting next Sunday night.

    A great political massmeeting took place last night at Andrew Schultz's hall, 697 Noble Street. The meeting was a very important one in that it was called to name a ...

    Polish
    IV, I F 5, I F 4, I F 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 23, 1891
    The Comedy in Springfield (Editorial)

    The conduct of the Democrats in Springfield deserves great credit, regardless of any objections one may have against their platform and their candidate to the United States Senate. Up to now the Democrats have performed their duties faithfully, and present indications are that they will continue to do so in the future in spite of the obstacles put in their way by other parties. From the very beginning, General Palmer has been receiving uninterruptedly, 101 votes from 101 Democrats.

    This being the case, the Republicans are acting queerly. They have a few candidates, but for some reason or other there is a discord among them, some voting for one candidate and others for another. They have convinced the whole nation that out of a hundred Republicans more than ninety could be persuaded to change their minds in regard to any of their candidates, whether the candidate is imposed upon them or even if he does not support their cause, 2provided that no Democrat will be elected. A few Republicans still hold together, but the honor belongs only to themselves as individuals; the party itself is apparently tottering.

    Minor parties stringing with the Republicans are by no means faultless, yet they may be excused on the ground that they still hope to have one of their candidates elected. Ten days ago two of these candidates stated emphatically that they do not trust the Republicans, and that in order to end this shameful comedy and save money to the State, they will give their votes to Palmer. They promised to do this within two days, but so far they have not done it.

    The comedy taking place in Springfield is a disgrace to the State, and it could be avoided if each party would firmly support its candidate. Even if no senator were elected, which would be a very unfortunate circumstance, it would not be a disgrace to the party. As the Republican Party has a few candidates, the whole comedy is only a dishonor to that organization.

    The conduct of the Democrats in Springfield deserves great credit, regardless of any objections one may have against their platform and their candidate to the United States Senate. Up to ...

    Polish
    I F 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 28, 1891
    Our Neighboring Country (Editorial)

    North of us lies a vast expanse of land belonging to England, called the Dominion of Canada. It is quite natural for the United States to have acquired a taste for this piece of land, and there is hope that in time the Canadian party which favors a union with the United States, will become strong enough to win. Then, in a short time, the United States would occupy the entire North American continent, with the exception of Mexico, and would undoubtedly become the greatest power on the face of the earth.

    With almost every year, the possibility of forming such a union is greater, and especially today, the prognosis in this respect is very favorable. It is true that this union is not as near as some enthusiastic optimists expect; yet, it cannot be denied that the possibility for its realization is greater now that it was, for instance, a year ago.

    2

    For this good outlook, we are indebted to Mr. Blaine, the Secretary of State, who endeavored to establish a pact of trade reciprocity between the United States and Canada, which would do away with high tariffs. Such agreements are authorized by McKinley's Bill, and Mr. Blaine has already taken advantage of the provision of the bill to make a reciprocal trade agreement with Brazil. However, his attempt to make a similar agreement with Canada was unsuccessful.

    There are two parties in Canada, a pro-government, or Tory party, which is against such agreement, and a Liberal Party, which favors it because its adherents are of the opinion that such agreement helps develop Canadian commerce.

    The Canadian Prime Minister, Sir John MacDonald, leader of the conservatives, opposes this proposed agreement impetuously. The combat between the two parties is very stubborn, and as it usually happens in such factional fights, both parties are throwing calumnies at each other. In order to deliver a decisive blow to the Liberal Party, Sir John MacDonald broadcast that if the entire Liberal Party favors a union with the United States, it is equivalent to treason, and he called every one who favors this trade reciprocity agreement a traitor to the country.

    3

    This aggravated many liberals, who are faithful to their government, and also opened the eyes of those who never thought of that "treason," with the result that many of them became supporters of the plan.

    In this manner, Sir John MacDonald, instead of delivering a staggering blow to the Liberal Party, strengthened it and in reality augmented the "treason", of which he accused the party.

    Recently, primary elections for nomination of government officials were held in Canada, and they showed a great gain by the Liberal Party.

    In the near future, we will know the results of this crisis and these struggles.

    North of us lies a vast expanse of land belonging to England, called the Dominion of Canada. It is quite natural for the United States to have acquired a taste ...

    Polish
    I F 3, I F 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 13, 1891
    Political Parties in America (Editorial)

    Besides the two major political parties in the United States, that is, besides the Republican and the Democratic parties, there is also a newly organized Farmers Party, or third party. This party is getting more and more supporters every day; in other words, it is becoming important. This importance is strengthened by the circumstance that the two old parties are at present equally strong. It is quite true that here and there one of the major parties predominates over the other, but this predominance is so insignificant in some places that a third party, even if small, may very often precipitate a victory for one of the major parties. Sometimes, on account of discord or antagonism between the two old parties, the third party may, by stubbornness or solidarity, gain a complete victory over the old ones.

    This was almost the case at Springfield, Illinois, during the last United States senatorial election, for, during the first few days of this week, 2it seemed as if Mr. Streeter, a representative of the Farmers' Party, would be elected United States Senator. Even though the Farmers Party had only three candidates running for the Legislature, an insignificant number if it is considered that the Democrats had one hundred and one and the Republicans one hundred, there was the danger that the farmers might win, even when Mr. Streeter was abandoned because of betraying his own party by yielding to the Republicans in order to gain their support. The Republicans have promised to give all their votes to Mr. Moore for not voting for Mr. Palmer, but Moore resisted the temptation and was honest enough not to break his promises and Mr. Palmer was finally elected.

    In this particular case the candidate of the majority has been elected, but there are instances in which a very small group of people may gain a victory over a very large party or over a large majority representing the entire nation.

    3

    It is apparent that the system of electing a United States senator, who is a representative of the entire state (and we would add: and the system of electing the President of the United States; because some day we may have a similar experience at a presidential election), is fundamentally wrong and ought to be changed. Such an important representative of the State should be elected by the citizens themselves and by a majority of votes as it is only then that we may rightly say that he is elected by the will of the people. Senator Palmer is planning to change this system.

    We know from the history of the United States, that some of the Presidents were elected by a minority of votes from the people, just because this minority had a bigger representation in Congress.

    Adams, Polk, Taylor, Buchanan, Lincoln, Hayes, Garfield, Cleveland, and Harrison did not get half of the popular votes. Besides, Hayes and Harrison received less votes than their opponents. In other words, if our presidents were elected by a majority of the popular votes, Tilden, a Democrat, not Hayes, a Republican, would have been elected in 1876, for Tilden received 4more votes than all his opponents. Also instead of Harrison, we would have Cleveland as president now, for he received 107,438 more votes than Harrison.

    We are not going to discuss the platform of any political party or try to point out which party has a better policy, for this is not time for it. However, we wish to point out to every conscientious citizen that a party cannot be judged by its name. It is an established fact that the policies of political parties change so much in the course of time that they degenerate into something different from our convictions.

    The principles adopted by the Democratic party are accepted later on by the Republican party, and vice versa. Consequently, there is nothing steady about a political party, with the exception of its name.

    It is not a good policy to adhere to one political party all the time just because we are affiliated with it. It is not true that it is treason to abandon one political party to join another. However, it 5is very important to know the platform of a party before making our decision to join it.

    The most respectable people, the most honorable citizens, and the most brilliant statesmen have left their parties and joined the opposite camp as soon as they realized that the principles of the opposite party was better and more useful to the country. They should not be condemned for such an act; on the contrary, they deserve admiration for their good sense and courage, because such an act could only be condemned by ignorant masses or unscrupulous politicians.

    Such example of good judgment and wonderful courage was given to our nation by Mr. John M. Palmer, who has been just elected United States Senator from our State. He is seventy-three years old now. Originally belonging to the Democratic party, he took an active part in it; but when the Republicans took very vigorous measures against slavery in the United States, a thing which once was favored by the Democrats, John M. Palmer left the Democratic party and, as a Republican, joined the ranks of the Union Army against the Democrats, fighting so bravely that he was made a major-general. After 6the Civil War, when the Democratic party changed its policy in respect to slavery, John M. Palmer, then a Republican governor, seeing weak points in the Republican party and better principles in the opposite camp, left the Republicans and joined the Democrats. By this decision he displayed his great courage, good judgment, and his firmness of principles even under the presence of the unsteady principles of his former party.

    The example given to the citizens of the United States by John M. Palmer is worthy of imitation, and the state of Illinois should be congratulated for electing him United States Senator and for not electing Streeter, who proved by his conduct to be unsteady in his principles.

    Besides the two major political parties in the United States, that is, besides the Republican and the Democratic parties, there is also a newly organized Farmers Party, or third party. ...

    Polish
    I F 5, I F 3, I E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 17, 1891
    Caucuses and Conventions (Editorial)

    Before every election, each political party in the United States holds a preliminary election, called a caucus, which is followed by a convention of the party,at which candidates are nominated and the platform of the party is adopted. The party is supposed to adhere to its platform and it is the duty of every candidate, when he is elected, to defend the principles embraced by whatever platform be adopted.

    The purpose of the caucus, which is not official or obligatory, is to find out which candidate is the strongest and best qualified to represent the entire party, and to prevent the splitting of the party's vote at the general election.

    The city elections will be held on April 7th of this year. In the mean-time, 2there will be held other caucuses and conventions.

    There are several political parties in our city, but the strongest and most important of them are the Republican and the Democratic.

    The Republican Party held a caucus last Friday and a convention on the following day; the Democratic Party will hold theirs next week, on the same days.

    At their last caucus, which was held last Friday, the Republicans chose their candidates for city officials. They nominated Hemsted Washburne for mayor, Jacob H. Tiedeman for treasuer, B. F. Richolson for city counsel; and J. R. B. Van Cleave for city clerk.

    Since these men are respectable and capable, they will be of great opposition to the Democratic candidates, who probably will be defended by 3the majority, to which most of the Poles belong. At their caucus, the Republicans nominated thirty-four candidates for alderman. Besides these, there are other city offices for which candidates were chosen. At the last convention, the Republican party formed its platform, which will be discussed in to-morrow's issue of our paper.

    Before every election, each political party in the United States holds a preliminary election, called a caucus, which is followed by a convention of the party,at which candidates are nominated ...

    Polish
    I F 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 19, 1891
    Current Politics (Editorial)

    To-morrow's Democratic caucus will most probably be very active. The most important office of the city, the office of the mayor, has two strong candidates. One of them is Mr. Cregier, the present Mayor of Chicago, and the other former Mayor Carter H. Harrison. This will be quite a fight, because both candidates have many supporters. Caucuses will be held in many wards for the purpose of finding the strength of the aldermanic candidates, and some wards have a few strong candidates.

    In the 8th Ward, Alderman Bunker has two opponents, Martin Morrison and J. J. McMahon, but the caucus will be held on Monday. In the 9th Ward there are two aldermanic candidates, John Denver and Max Kirchmann; in the 15th Ward, Michael Ryan and Otto Huelsman; in the 16th a Pole, Stanley Kunz, and two Germans, R. H. Sigmund and Peter Mueller are running for the aldermancy.

    2

    Personal Rights Advocate publishes an article about Carter H. Harrison, candidate of the Personal Rights League, saying that he stands a good chance to get the nomination for mayor on the Democratic ticket. The article goes on to give the reason why the Personal Liberty League considers Mr. Harrison a better candidate than Cregier.

    Last Tuesday's registration brought unusual results, as it disclosed 45,826 new voters. Last fall there were 50,000 new voters. It is very strange that in so short a time so many citizens changed their minds and decided to vote.

    It is reported that the Democrats have gained many supporters at the last registration.

    To-morrow's Democratic caucus will most probably be very active. The most important office of the city, the office of the mayor, has two strong candidates. One of them is Mr. ...

    Polish
    I F 5, I F 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 23, 1891
    Current Politics

    The Democrats held their convention last Saturday, and the caucus at which they chose their delegates for the convention was held last Friday. Every one knew what would be the result of the convention, because the number of delegates representing Cregier was the largest. However, the supporters of Harrison did not lose hope, notwithstanding the fact that they were denied a voice at the convention and were ridiculed. They separated themselves from the party, accused the Democrats of unfairness, left the convention, gathered at Uhlich's Hall, and nominated Harrison for mayor of Chicago.

    This split the Democratic party into two factions, one nominating Cregier and the other Harrison for the mayoralty. Such split is of no benefit to the Democratic Party, for if Elmer Washburn would renounce his candidacy in favor of Hempstead Washburn, about which we hear rumors, the Republicans could win this year. The Democrats belonging to the old party nominated 2Mr. De Witt C. Cregier for mayor, George A. Weiss for city treasurer, Jacob J. Kern for city counsel, and James C. Strain for city clerk. The separatists, or faction which nominated Harrison for mayor, did not make any other nominations. This will be done later.

    We cannot discuss this matter in detail right now; however, we will have an opportunity to do so two weeks from now. This will give us time for a deep consideration, after which we will predict who will get the votes on the 7th of April.

    Here is some more information. Last Saturday the Democrats also held a special convention for the West Side of the city. The preliminary caucuses to nominate aldermen have already been held in many wards and will be held in others. The 16th Ward will have it to-morrow.

    The Poles held a political meeting last night at Schulz's hall, where 3they had an opportunity to hear discussions about the primary elections. The speakers discussed the aldermanic caucus of the 16th Ward, which will be held to-morrow at 1 P.M. The voting will take place at 206 Center Avenue, near Milwaukee Avenue. Every one who declares himself a Democrat and states that he is registered will be allowed to vote. Short talks were delivered by Kozlowski, Kowal, Bardonski, and Kunz. The speakers recommended Kunz for alderman of the 16th Ward, and stated that he will be elected if all Poles will vote for him. Kunz is the only Polish candidate for alderman of the 16th Ward.

    All Polish voters will gather Tuesday, between 10 A.M. and 12 noon, at the appointed places, from where they will march to the strains of a band to the polling place at 206 Center Avenue, where they will cast their votes. At last night's meeting, the citizens of the 16th Ward nominated Kunz for alderman.

    The Democrats held their convention last Saturday, and the caucus at which they chose their delegates for the convention was held last Friday. Every one knew what would be the ...

    Polish
    I F 5, I F 4, I F 1, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 26, 1891
    Peter Kiolbassa (Current Politics)

    For a long time the supporters of Harrison tried to win over the Poles and the Bohemians as they had the Germans. At one of their meetings which took place at Milwaukee Avenue and Noble Street, several influential Poles were made vice [chairmen]. Mr. P. Kiolbassa, a very popular Pole, was chairman of that meeting. The supporters of Harrison recognized Kiolbassa's popularity among the Polish people, and for this reason asked him to act as chairman of that meeting. Later on when Harrison and his supporters withdrew from the Democratic party, and Harrison was nominated illegally for mayor, his party made an attempt to gain supporters among the Poles. The supporters of Harrison turned to Peter Kiolbassa, a popular Pole, and asked him to accept the candidacy for city clerk but Mr. Kiolbassa refused it. The Poles do not sympathize with Harrison, because he is weakening the Democratic party by his illagal candidacy and is thus helping the Republicans.

    2

    The Poles who support the Democratic platform wish to help the Democrats, even if they have to oppose the one who once had their sympathy and now has lost it because his candidacy threatens the victory of the Democratic party. Mr. Kiolbassa, considering Cregier the legal candidate refused the Harrison group's offer [rather than join the"secessionist" group, he would prefer not to hold office].

    At present George A. Weiss, the candidate nominated by the Democratic convention for city treasurer, has resigned and joined Harrison's faction. Therefore this office is at present vacant.

    Attention was called to our countryman, Peter Kiolbassa. He accepted the candidacy which was offered, and will undoubtedly be elected. American newspapers gave the incident a great deal of publicity, relating the facts and giving a biography of our popular countryman; they called him a Polish "king" and a most influential citizen on the West Side. We are certain that all Poles will vote for Mr. Kiolbassa at the time of the election.

    For a long time the supporters of Harrison tried to win over the Poles and the Bohemians as they had the Germans. At one of their meetings which took place ...

    Polish
    IV, I C, I C, I F 1, I F 4, I F 5, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 27, 1891
    A Great Political Meeting at Polish Hall

    Next Tuesday night there will be a great political meeting at the Polish hall on Bradley Street, where the candidacy of Peter Kiolbassa will be discussed. One of the speakers will be the newly elected senator, (elected by the State Legislature) Mr. Palmer, who is a great representative of the Democratic party in the State of Illinois.

    Senator Palmer, after thorough investigation, came to the conclusion that the nomination of Harrison was illegal, and he is coming to Chicago to give his personal assistance to the regular Democratic candidate. Tuesday night he will speak to the Poles at the Polish hall on Bradley Street.

    Together with Senator Palmer there will arrive the one hundred and one estimable Democrats from Springfield whose firm solidarity and courageous perseverance assured the election of a Democratic candidate from Illinois to the United States Senate.

    Among them is a Polish leader, Mr. Jan A. Kwasigroch.

    Next Tuesday night there will be a great political meeting at the Polish hall on Bradley Street, where the candidacy of Peter Kiolbassa will be discussed. One of the speakers ...

    Polish
    I F 5, IV