The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- August 14, 1889
    Local News

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an active movement in order to try to secure the holding of this fair in our city. The mayor of our city then selected a committee consisting of the most prominent citizens of the state for this aim, so that they could take care of this matter.

    From among the Poles only two citizens belong to this committee and they are Mr. Peter Kiolbasa and Mr. Zbigniew Brodowski.

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, I F 5, I F 4, IV
  • Zgoda -- March 26, 1890
    Election

    April 1st is election day in Chicago.

    Until 6 o'clock, March 24th, we didn't receive any information as to the candidates selected to run on the Democratic ticket; according to rumors, we know of only one Polish candidate on the Democratic ticket, he is Mr. August Kovalski, seeking re-election as alderman of the 16th ward.

    Mr. August Kowalski has held the aldermanic office of the 16th ward for the past two years, and he elevated himself with his own efforts and he gave protection and assistance to his fellow comrades in all their undertakings, and did his utmost to help them in their hour of need.

    We can have complete confidence that if he is re-elected he will continue to show his good will and efficient work. In the 16th ward only one Democratic candidate will run for alderman. This is to make sure that Mr. A. Kowalski, a Polish candidate, will not meet any opposition, and be assured of the best possible chance of victory; by this move they are keeping all the votes of the Polish People on the Democratic side, thus avoiding a split in the party's vote.

    2

    We are sure that all Polish Democratic voters of the 16th ward, without any exception, will give their support to Mr. August Kowalski. Candidates seeking other offices are asking all Polish voters for support. Because of the strength in Polish votes, I, Mr. Kowalski, a candidate for re-election am depending on Poles to carry me back into my office.

    April 1st is election day in Chicago. Until 6 o'clock, March 24th, we didn't receive any information as to the candidates selected to run on the Democratic ticket; according to ...

    Polish
    I F 1, I F 4, IV
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 16, 1890
    Polish Politics - a Victory of the Poles

    It appears that the Democratic ticket is now complete. The nomination of the ten candidates for the City Council brought considerable objection from many sources and the Executive Committee was flooded with requests for a change.

    The Poles wanted a representative on the County Board and many Democrats of the North Side felt that discrimination was shown, since the number of the Commissioners for the North Side had been reduced to only two. A part of the disgruntled constituents could be appeased, since John J. Corbett, one of the nominees, tendered his resignation. He sent the following communication to the committee. "In the interests of, and to promote harmony in the ranks of the Democratic Party, I decided to withdraw my name from the Democratic ticket which proclaims my candidacy as a member of the County Commissioners. I hope that my resignation will be accepted and a Polish gentleman be nominated instead." Nothing could have been more welcome to the Executive Board.

    An explanation was published immediately, wherein J. Hutchinson and two others took cognizance of the resignation which had been tendered to further party interests. It was accepted with laudatory comment, and Victor Bardonsky was proposed at the behest of the Committee of Eleven.

    2

    Mr. Bardonski is a Russian Pole by birth, about thirty-five years of age, and the owner of two drug stores at 707 Milwaukee Avenue and 615 Noble Street.

    During the evening the Central Committee held a meeting, and under the leadership of Mr. Hutchinson, Mr. Bardonski's candidacy was ratified. Other topics of the session were confined to campaign matters. A mass-meeting for Democrats has been arranged to take place in the Hall of Battery "D". The voting list contains about 200,000 names at this time.

    It appears that the Democratic ticket is now complete. The nomination of the ten candidates for the City Council brought considerable objection from many sources and the Executive Committee was ...

    Polish
    I F 4, IV
  • Zgoda -- October 29, 1890
    About Election

    November the 4th is election day in Chicago and Cook County. It is very important to take part in this election because if the people don't and the wrong candidate is elected, the poor working classes and the less fortunate ones suffer.

    It is the duty of all citizens to make arrangements as to the best time suitable for them to be present at the polling place, either before or after working hours. This should not be neglected. Many people say, If I do or if I don't vote, it cannot mean much; it is only one vote. But these people never realize that at the end of election day all these single votes count into thousands.

    The number of Polish voters in Chicago is very large, but if the number of Polish people registered is not near the total number of citizens voting, then how can we have any Polish candidates run for office and be victorious if we neglect our duty?

    2

    The trouble with most of the Polish people is that they are easy going and many haven't received their citizenship papers. That is the main reason the Republicans and Democrats are not anxious to place Polish candidates on their tickets.

    They feel that as long as at least one Polish candidate's name appears on their ballot, their worries about the Polish vote is settled.

    The Polish people should take more interest in local politics, and not sit back and watch the other nationalities monopolize the political offices.

    For example, on this present Republican ballot there is not one Polish candidate running for any county office, now it is our turn to do something about this; if they can place their own men as candidates, and are not worried about the Poles, do not vote their ticket, vote for the party that has Polish candidates' names.

    3

    They feel that as long as at least one Polish name is on the ballot, the Polish people will vote for that party. The Democratic Party did its share for the Poles by placing two Polish candidates on the ballot.

    John Kwasigroch, of the 13th Senatorial District, is a candidate for the Illinois State Legislature. His name and character are known, and all the sensible Polish citizens will do their part by supporting him.

    Candidate for county commissioner is Victor Bardonski, a man of integrity, honest and trustworthy, who is well known throughout the county of Cook. The duties of the county commissioner are to take care of all county affairs, including the poor and needy, which is the main thing. If we do not have at least one county commissioner in the United States, who is going to look after the welfare of the Poles, many of whom cannot read or write the English language?

    Victor Bardonski pledges that if he is elected, the Poles can depend on him to do all in his power to make life easier for his fellow countrymen.

    November the 4th is election day in Chicago and Cook County. It is very important to take part in this election because if the people don't and the wrong candidate ...

    Polish
    I F 1, I F 3, I F 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 29, 1891
    Polish Activities in Chicago

    A great political massmeeting took place last night at Andrew Schultz's hall, 697 Noble Street. The meeting was a very important one in that it was called to name a committee for the 16th Ward Democratic political organization. Elected for this committee were Mr. John Arkuszewski, president; Victor Bardonski, vice-president; and J. Kendziorski, secretary. An executive committee was also formed of which the following persons were elected members: John Czekata, E. Z. Brodowski, M. Michalski, Frank Murkowski, Joseph Pytlak, W. Tomasik, and John Biniak. Mr. Peter Kiolbasa was picked out as candidate for alderman of the ward. Mr. Kiolbasa, we think, will get all the votes of the Poles and also many votes from other groups, because his ability and righteousness are well known not only to the Poles but also, to the Americans and the Germans. The committee will have its meeting next Sunday night.

    A great political massmeeting took place last night at Andrew Schultz's hall, 697 Noble Street. The meeting was a very important one in that it was called to name a ...

    Polish
    IV, I F 5, I F 4, I F 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 14, 1891
    America and Poland (Editorial)

    Come to me all you who are oppressed and enslaved. You, who are not allowed to act, speak, feel, and think, according to the dictates of your heart in your own land; come under "protecting wings of freedom." Here you may profess your religion, express your emotions, and love your country openly, for here we have freedom and independence.

    Free America appeals to the Irish, Poles, and all similarly oppressed nations. Those who have lived in bondage can seek freedom here. Here they breathe freely, and rest in peace, and here, with pride, they become citizens of a free country, which is not ruled either by the Czar or knout.

    To this country have come the Germans, Frenchmen, Italians, Spaniards, Englishmen, and Swedes, whose fatherland they will always cherish, but 2their government was a burden to them. To this country have come all nationalities for the purpose of creating a great Republic of the free, and unfortunate; here also have come those who are unworthy of freedom and liberty, and for this reason the right kind of citizens must make laws which will protect us against the evil influence of the undesirables.

    However, a person does not cease to be a son of his motherland on account of becoming a naturalized citizen of this country. His presence and exemplary life in this country are a living protest against conditions created by a certain clique in his native land. It is an example of a life which he desires to see in his fatherland. It is an endeavor to introduce these conditions in a country which he left.

    If we wish to make this example affective, if we wish to open the eyes of the blind, or of those who abuse authority, we must enact practical laws and obey them.

    3

    This example is workable, for it operates in all countries which have introduced democratic constitutions, except in Russia.

    These reforms in the democratic countries have been affected by the good example of the United States. This example has opened the eyes of the oppressed, and also of the oppressors; the first demanded more rights, and the second granted them. If the governments of those democratic governments do not function properly, it is because the example was not, and is not yet perfect. Let us improve this example. Let us make it worthy of imitation, and the results produced by its influence in the next hundred years will be more apparent.

    In order to accomplish this, we must have, above all, good schools, for "knowledge is mother of wisdom, and ignorance is mother of bondage. We must have good schools, schools that educate mind and heart, because one is incomplete without the other; schools which teach knowledge and morality; schools that are not below the standard of those in Europe, 4if we wish to bring up good citizens, an example for Europe.

    Freedom does not mean giving up the faith, language, or traditions, of the fathers. Only the Czar's government is depriving its people of these things by means of the knout. Democratic governments do not do that.

    The English language has been adopted as a medium of thought exchange in the United States, because the English originally, were predominant in this country. As good citizens, we should know the language of the country, but this does not mean that this country is forcing any one to give up his native tongue. A country must have a common language for the good of the whole nation, and every good citizen should know it.

    Come to me all you who are oppressed and enslaved. You, who are not allowed to act, speak, feel, and think, according to the dictates of your heart in your ...

    Polish
    I C, I A 1 a, I A 3, I F 2, I F 4, I F 6, I E
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 19, 1891
    Current Politics (Editorial)

    To-morrow's Democratic caucus will most probably be very active. The most important office of the city, the office of the mayor, has two strong candidates. One of them is Mr. Cregier, the present Mayor of Chicago, and the other former Mayor Carter H. Harrison. This will be quite a fight, because both candidates have many supporters. Caucuses will be held in many wards for the purpose of finding the strength of the aldermanic candidates, and some wards have a few strong candidates.

    In the 8th Ward, Alderman Bunker has two opponents, Martin Morrison and J. J. McMahon, but the caucus will be held on Monday. In the 9th Ward there are two aldermanic candidates, John Denver and Max Kirchmann; in the 15th Ward, Michael Ryan and Otto Huelsman; in the 16th a Pole, Stanley Kunz, and two Germans, R. H. Sigmund and Peter Mueller are running for the aldermancy.

    2

    Personal Rights Advocate publishes an article about Carter H. Harrison, candidate of the Personal Rights League, saying that he stands a good chance to get the nomination for mayor on the Democratic ticket. The article goes on to give the reason why the Personal Liberty League considers Mr. Harrison a better candidate than Cregier.

    Last Tuesday's registration brought unusual results, as it disclosed 45,826 new voters. Last fall there were 50,000 new voters. It is very strange that in so short a time so many citizens changed their minds and decided to vote.

    It is reported that the Democrats have gained many supporters at the last registration.

    To-morrow's Democratic caucus will most probably be very active. The most important office of the city, the office of the mayor, has two strong candidates. One of them is Mr. ...

    Polish
    I F 5, I F 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 21, 1891
    Aldermanic Caucus of the Sixteenth Ward

    At last the commissioners of the Sixteenth Ward agreed to hold an aldermanic caucus. Democratic voters may choose a candidate for Alderman of the Sixteenth Ward next Tuesday. Only one place has been reserved for this purpose, and those citizens of the Sixteenth Ward who desire to vote must go there. This caucus, however, is not official and will not be controlled by the law. Whoever is not acquainted with political tricks, will wonder why this preliminary election did not take place on the same day when a candidate for mayor was nominated, and why this election was not called under Crawford's Law. This question may be answered in the following way: This caucus was called by the commissioners of the Sixteenth Ward, who were elected by most of Polish votes. These commissioners, although one of them is a Pole, do not favor a Pole for alderman, and in order to assure a victory for the German candidate Sigmund, have set another day 2than the day of the mayoralty nomination for this caucus. This is one of the clever tricks which our high class politicians resort to very often.

    If this primary election or caucus were held together with the one for mayor, Sigmund would undoubtedly be defeated, because too many Poles oppose him. The commissioners of the Sixteenth Ward are taking it for granted that if the date of this caucus is changed to Tuesday, a majority of the Poles will not vote. Secondly, the polling place will be located on Milwaukee Avenue, right in the heart of the German neighborhood, where it will be very convenient for them to vote but where many Poles will not care to go. Sigmund will probably be nominated, even though he is not supported by the citizens of the Sixteenth Ward.

    But this is not all, for this caucus was not called and will not be conducted under the Crawford's Law; therefore, it will be very easy to cheat. Anyone who cares will be allowed to vote, regardless of whether he lives in that 3ward or not, and the judges may cheat if they wish because no one will control them or make them responsible for their actions. The laws in this respect are inadequate. For this reason all Poles should take an active part in this preliminary election and vote next Tuesday, if they desire to express their will as the will of the majority of this ward. The address of the polling place will be announced later.

    We wish to remind you that there will be a political meeting at Schulz's hall next Sunday,at which the election of an alderman for the Sixteenth Ward will be discussed.

    At last the commissioners of the Sixteenth Ward agreed to hold an aldermanic caucus. Democratic voters may choose a candidate for Alderman of the Sixteenth Ward next Tuesday. Only one ...

    Polish
    I F 4, I H
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 23, 1891
    Current Politics

    The Democrats held their convention last Saturday, and the caucus at which they chose their delegates for the convention was held last Friday. Every one knew what would be the result of the convention, because the number of delegates representing Cregier was the largest. However, the supporters of Harrison did not lose hope, notwithstanding the fact that they were denied a voice at the convention and were ridiculed. They separated themselves from the party, accused the Democrats of unfairness, left the convention, gathered at Uhlich's Hall, and nominated Harrison for mayor of Chicago.

    This split the Democratic party into two factions, one nominating Cregier and the other Harrison for the mayoralty. Such split is of no benefit to the Democratic Party, for if Elmer Washburn would renounce his candidacy in favor of Hempstead Washburn, about which we hear rumors, the Republicans could win this year. The Democrats belonging to the old party nominated 2Mr. De Witt C. Cregier for mayor, George A. Weiss for city treasurer, Jacob J. Kern for city counsel, and James C. Strain for city clerk. The separatists, or faction which nominated Harrison for mayor, did not make any other nominations. This will be done later.

    We cannot discuss this matter in detail right now; however, we will have an opportunity to do so two weeks from now. This will give us time for a deep consideration, after which we will predict who will get the votes on the 7th of April.

    Here is some more information. Last Saturday the Democrats also held a special convention for the West Side of the city. The preliminary caucuses to nominate aldermen have already been held in many wards and will be held in others. The 16th Ward will have it to-morrow.

    The Poles held a political meeting last night at Schulz's hall, where 3they had an opportunity to hear discussions about the primary elections. The speakers discussed the aldermanic caucus of the 16th Ward, which will be held to-morrow at 1 P.M. The voting will take place at 206 Center Avenue, near Milwaukee Avenue. Every one who declares himself a Democrat and states that he is registered will be allowed to vote. Short talks were delivered by Kozlowski, Kowal, Bardonski, and Kunz. The speakers recommended Kunz for alderman of the 16th Ward, and stated that he will be elected if all Poles will vote for him. Kunz is the only Polish candidate for alderman of the 16th Ward.

    All Polish voters will gather Tuesday, between 10 A.M. and 12 noon, at the appointed places, from where they will march to the strains of a band to the polling place at 206 Center Avenue, where they will cast their votes. At last night's meeting, the citizens of the 16th Ward nominated Kunz for alderman.

    The Democrats held their convention last Saturday, and the caucus at which they chose their delegates for the convention was held last Friday. Every one knew what would be the ...

    Polish
    I F 5, I F 4, I F 1, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 26, 1891
    Peter Kiolbassa (Current Politics)

    For a long time the supporters of Harrison tried to win over the Poles and the Bohemians as they had the Germans. At one of their meetings which took place at Milwaukee Avenue and Noble Street, several influential Poles were made vice [chairmen]. Mr. P. Kiolbassa, a very popular Pole, was chairman of that meeting. The supporters of Harrison recognized Kiolbassa's popularity among the Polish people, and for this reason asked him to act as chairman of that meeting. Later on when Harrison and his supporters withdrew from the Democratic party, and Harrison was nominated illegally for mayor, his party made an attempt to gain supporters among the Poles. The supporters of Harrison turned to Peter Kiolbassa, a popular Pole, and asked him to accept the candidacy for city clerk but Mr. Kiolbassa refused it. The Poles do not sympathize with Harrison, because he is weakening the Democratic party by his illagal candidacy and is thus helping the Republicans.

    2

    The Poles who support the Democratic platform wish to help the Democrats, even if they have to oppose the one who once had their sympathy and now has lost it because his candidacy threatens the victory of the Democratic party. Mr. Kiolbassa, considering Cregier the legal candidate refused the Harrison group's offer [rather than join the"secessionist" group, he would prefer not to hold office].

    At present George A. Weiss, the candidate nominated by the Democratic convention for city treasurer, has resigned and joined Harrison's faction. Therefore this office is at present vacant.

    Attention was called to our countryman, Peter Kiolbassa. He accepted the candidacy which was offered, and will undoubtedly be elected. American newspapers gave the incident a great deal of publicity, relating the facts and giving a biography of our popular countryman; they called him a Polish "king" and a most influential citizen on the West Side. We are certain that all Poles will vote for Mr. Kiolbassa at the time of the election.

    For a long time the supporters of Harrison tried to win over the Poles and the Bohemians as they had the Germans. At one of their meetings which took place ...

    Polish
    IV, I C, I C, I F 1, I F 4, I F 5, I C