The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 29, 1892
    Democratic Meeting of the Sixteenth Ward

    Last night the Democratic Club of the sixteenth ward held its pre-election meeting at A. Schutz's hall, Blackhawk and Noble Streets. Alderman S. Kunz opened the meeting and named J. Arkuszewski to act as president and F. Murkowski as secretary.

    Alderman Kunz made the first speech of the evening, and after him followed City Treasurer Peter Kiolbassa. The following persons also spoke: Joseph Schroeder, L. Roland, John Biniak, A. J. Kowalski, and Attorney M. Kaczmarek.

    Mr. Kowalski, who had been supported as alderman of the sixteenth ward by the other fellow speakers, asked the people to tell him frankly if they would support him in the April elections. At his words practically the entire assemblage rose to its feet and amidst the applause was heard the cry of "Kowalski must be our alderman ten times over."

    2

    The Poles were informed of the importance of the coming election and urged to cast their vote. Getting a Pole on the West Town ticket would be another step forward in city politics. Keen effort in this direction will probably place one of our men on the ticket for Collector, or some other office.

    The Polish citizens of the sixteenth ward showed their interest by filling the hall to capacity. This is a good indication that their vote will be a deciding factor in the April elections.

    Last night the Democratic Club of the sixteenth ward held its pre-election meeting at A. Schutz's hall, Blackhawk and Noble Streets. Alderman S. Kunz opened the meeting and named J. ...

    Polish
    I F 4, I F 2, I F 5, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 14, 1892
    Republican Organization of the Ninth Ward Nominates Lauferski for Alderman

    During the present primary election, in the ninth Ward, especially, there is much excitement among the Polish element because the Republican organization has nominated a Pole to run for the aldermanic office in April. The choice of G. Lauferski brings a Polish aldermanic possibility for the first time in the history of the ninth Ward.

    The Polish people of that Ward realized the significance of this victory, and have immediately planned a mass meeting after the primaries. This meeting was held last night at St. Albert's Parish Hall. A committee of fifteen was chosen to lay plans for a campaign in the Ward. S. Rokosz was chosen as a delegate to make a collection, and over one hundred dollars was given towards the support of the campaign.

    Every member that crowded the hall pledged to support their native son.

    2

    Among those present was also a Bohemian delegation that offered assistance. To assure victory of this first Polish aldermanic possibility, it was agreed to hold political meetings everyday during the coming week.

    During the present primary election, in the ninth Ward, especially, there is much excitement among the Polish element because the Republican organization has nominated a Pole to run for the ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I F 3, I F 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 01, 1892
    The Coming Election

    In a few days election day will be upon us. In tomorrow's and Monday's issues, we will publish a facsimile of the ballots to be used. We will point out to our readers the proper procedure to be followed when casting a vote for a candidate. Although the people have been instructed along this line at many political meetings and through the daily papers, it is our contention that there are still many persons who don't make out the ballot right, making it valueless. Therefore, in the next two issues we are going to give special attention to the proper method of making out the ballot.

    We wish to point out that it is the duty of every naturalized Pole to make use of his right to vote. Under no circumstances should he disregard this privilege, and those who are qualified to vote but do not, are unworthy of being called citizens of the United States.

    In the United States the people govern the country. From a political point of view, this form of government ranks higher than any other form 2of government in other countries. Here the people make the laws and elect individuals to fill the various offices of the government. Because the people as a whole cannot agree upon certain issues, they elect persons to represent them. These representatives are given the instructions that they are to follow. Political factions represent the ideals of different groups, and the stronger a certain group gets in office, the more certain are its ideals or proposals to be adopted. But if the members of any party are indifferent and do not vote, it will be easier for the opposing side to win. It can rightfully be said that those who don't vote are the ones that neglect their privilege of governing the country.

    This is how we choose our city, county, and state officials, and finally our Federal officers.

    Next week we are to elect city and district officials.

    This day is of especial importance to the Poles because certain Polish candidates are running for office. Let there be no one that will shirk his duty as a citizen, for it is his privilege in this free country to pick the candidate he wants.

    In a few days election day will be upon us. In tomorrow's and Monday's issues, we will publish a facsimile of the ballots to be used. We will point out ...

    Polish
    I C, I A 3, I F 2, I F 4, I J
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 01, 1892
    Polish Political Activity

    Sunday afternoon, March 27, a political meeting of the Democratic party was held in R. Retmanski's Hall on the West side. Peter Kiolbassa, city treasurer, and Mr. Kozlowski, the principal speakers, spoke in favor of the Democratic candidate, E. Marsch, for alderman of the thirty-third ward.

    That same evening Kosciuszko's Political Club held a meeting in the church hall. Members of the club did not permit the above speakers on the rostrum, because they are supporting another candidate. The procedure of the meeting was rather broken-up.

    The afternoon session was executed without interruption.

    2

    It is apparent, as the results of these two meetings show, that some of our citizens are supporters and representatives of Polonia and others, instead of spreading the good will of the Dziennik Chicagoski. They stage demonstrations in saloons and confuse the people. If it were not for this handful of agitators, we could live peacefully. The Poles of Chicago belong to the Polish Roman Catholic Union, and the Polish National Alliance. Yet they get along with each other most cordially. In fact, we can use them as a fine example of harmonious relationship between Poles in America, although both lack a leader.

    Sunday afternoon, March 27, a political meeting of the Democratic party was held in R. Retmanski's Hall on the West side. Peter Kiolbassa, city treasurer, and Mr. Kozlowski, the principal ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I F 3, I F 4, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 02, 1892
    The Ballot

    On page two [of the newspaper] we are printing a copy of the ballot of the sixteenth ward. We cannot print all the ballots of each ward, as space does not permit. Our purpose is to enlighten the people of this ward as to the proper procedure to be used in casting a vote for the various candidates the voters wish to support.

    If one desires to give his vote to all the Democratic candidates, he needs only to place one cross in the large circle before the word 'Democratic.' The same applies if one wants to vote for all the candidates of the Peoples Trade and Labor ticket. Only one cross is necessary in the desired circle preceding the respective party.

    2

    It happens that there are those who do not wish to vote a straight ticket, because they favor a particular candidate from another party, but wish to cast the remaining votes for another party group. In this respect, a cross is not placed in any one large circle. Instead, a cross is marked in each square preceding the desired candidate's name, otherwise the ballot is invalid.

    Special attention must be given when voting a split ticket. Only one cross can be marked in the square for a candidate running for a particular office. That is, a cross can only be placed before one candidate for alderman, or Town Clerk, and not two. The ballot in this respect would be invalid.

    3

    This is a simple matter. A preparatory study should be made of this procedure. If this is done, the voter can spare himself the unknowing shame of marking the simple ballot erroneously. Not only that, he can also strengthen the possibilities of his favored candidate. There is no reason for mistakes in voting. With a little instruction, even a child could do this correctly. In case a person makes a mistake marking his ballot, another can be secured, providing the original one is returned.

    If one cannot comprehend the above instructions or cannot help himself because he cannot read English, he can get the assistance from the election judges. There are two judges from each party who are assigned to assist those requiring aid in filling out the ballot. They will make the crosses as designated by the voter.

    4

    A person is not allowed to take the ticket out into the street or home. All help must be received before entering the polling place. If any one burns, destroys, or hides the ballot, another one will not be given.

    All the tickets in all the wards of the West side have the same candidates for Town Offices, with the exception of alderman.

    All the tickets of the West Town section will have the name of the candidate, August J. Kowalski, as West Town Collector on the Democratic ticket, and also on the Workers' party ticket. The same occurs in the wards of the South Town section on which tickets appears the name of candidate Juliusz Piotrowski, who is another of our citizens, running for the Supervisor's office.

    5

    All the Polish people in these two sections should get together and strive hard to assure their countrymen victory in the coming election.

    We will gladly assist all those desiring help in making out the ballot if they will come to our office on Monday or Tuesday morning. Help will be rendered free of charge.

    At the end of the ballot, there is added a proposition in a form of a resolution to have a part of the Town of Cicero annexed to the city of Chicago. At the end of the written matter, two words appear: Yes and No. Those who are in favor of this idea should simply mark out the word 'No' and should let the word 'Yes' stand as it is. Those who are against it, should cross out the word 'Yes' and should let the word 'No' remain intact. If none of these words are crossed out, or if both are, 6the voter in this instance did not cast a vote for this cause.

    7
    Democratic Republican Peoples Trade and Labor Independent Democratic
    []For Assessor Dennis Considine 810 Fulton St. []For Assessor Edward J. Dwyer 228 Indiana St. []For Assessor James O'Connel 12 Seldon St.
    []For Collector August J. Kowalski 617 Noble Street []For Collector Adam Wolff 662 Superior St. []For Collector August J. Kowalski 617 Noble St.
    []For Supervisor Frank J. Niehoff 278 Leavitt St. []For Superisor J. C. McGil 821 W. Adams St. []For Supervisor Frank J. Niehoff 278 Leavitt St.
    []For Town Clerk Mortimer J. Scanlon 514 S. Wood St. []For Town Clerk John Thoran 147 Laughton St. []For Town Clerk Mortimer J. Scanlon 514 S. Wood St.
    []For Alderman Peter J. Ellert 482 N. Ashland Ave. []For Alderman John Schwerin 276 N. Ashland Ave. []For Alderman Peter J. Ellert []For Alderman John J. Dahlmann 587 Milwaukee Ave,
    8

    The proposition to annex that part of the incorporated Town of Cicero, lying east of the center line of Austin Avenue, north of the center line of 26th Street, extending east from the center line of Austin Avenue; otherwise described as the west half of Section four (4), and nine (9); the east half of Section five (5), eight (8), seventeen (17), and twenty (20); the northeast quarter of Section twenty-nine (29); the north-west quarter of Section twenty-seven (27); the west half of the west half of Section twenty-two (22); and all of Section sixteen (16); and twenty-one (21), in Township thirty-nine (39) north, Range thirteen (13) east of the third principal meridian to the incorporated City of Chicago, Cook County.

    YES

    NO

    On page two [of the newspaper] we are printing a copy of the ballot of the sixteenth ward. We cannot print all the ballots of each ward, as space does ...

    Polish
    I F 1, I F 2, I F 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 06, 1892
    After Election (Summary)

    Yesterday's election results, unfortunately, did not favor any of our candidates, although as a whole, the Democrats won more seats than the Republicans. The results have shown that in the Wards where the Polish population is small, their strength in other wards was not strong enough to offset other forces.

    Our candidate for West Town Collector, August J. Kowalski, polled a large plurality in the Polish wards. But this was not large enough to offset the votes of the Republican candidate polled in other wards.

    The same fate faced our Polish candidate for South Town Supervisor. Although he piled up a heavy vote in the first and sixth wards, he gave way to his Republican opponent in other wards.

    Yesterday's election results, unfortunately, did not favor any of our candidates, although as a whole, the Democrats won more seats than the Republicans. The results have shown that in the ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I F 4, I F 5
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 06, 1892
    The Polish Publishers Association of Chicago (Editorial)

    The board of directors of the Polish Publishers Association convened for their monthly meeting at their headquarters on Division Street, Monday, April 4.

    After the reading of the administrative and financial reports of the organization, Father K. Domagalski, the present chairman and editor of the organization, signed a contract to serve another two years. The contents of the contract primarily concern the management of the editor. Therefore, no space will be given to this transaction.

    The following resolutions, however, have been adopted and are made public:

    2

    1. The periodical Wiara I Ojczyzna, together with the Dziennik Chicagoski, are the exclusive property of the Association.

    2. The weekly, Wiara I Ojczyzna, is the exclusive organ of the Polish Roman Catholic Union, as has been agreed upon at the conference in South Bend, Indiana last November.

    3. Dziennik Chicagoski, a daily newspaper, is not an organ of any specific party or group. It has as its aim the political and material interests of the Polish people in the United States, especially that of the Polish citizens and candidates in Chicago.

    4. Besides the department heads of the organization, no one has the right to make laws, give orders, etc., to the editor-in-chief or his 3assistants. This right has been vested in the board of directors, solely who decide by a majority vote the rules and regulations of the Association.

    N.B. It is hoped that after this announcement, the many queries from strange and sundry sources, which are not desired, will come to an end. The insinuations of the meddlers are uncalled for.

    The board of directors of the Polish Publishers Association convened for their monthly meeting at their headquarters on Division Street, Monday, April 4. After the reading of the administrative and ...

    Polish
    II B 2 d 1, I F 2, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 09, 1892
    [The Convention of the Liberty] (Editorial)

    We have finally received some information as to why the Liberty League gives no evidence of its presence. The "Zgoda" press offers an explanation to the answer of the Committee of the All-Republican Congress, from which we are informed that the convention of the Liberty League has been postponed until the fall or Oct. 12, 1892. Hence, let us wait until that time. We fear however, that the selection of that day for a convention was again ill-chosen and a new postponement will be necessary. The convention was postponed from April 30 to October 12, because on April 30, a conclave of the Sons of the American Revolution was held, and many members of the League also belong to other organizations. Consequently, one of these conventions had to be set aside until a later date. On October 12, however, a great event will take place in Chicago: the dedication of the fair, a true commemoration of the four hundredth anniversary of the discovery of America.

    2

    Perhaps many members of the Liberty League will be obliged to participate in this national festivity in Chicago and perhaps another postponement will follow. Why do they select such unsuitable dates?

    The Zgoda press charges us for not greeting sincerely the newly published Telegraf. This charge is unjust. Our greeting was very cordial, and, whoever read it will admit it. The Latin saying at the outset, did not detract from the ensuing words that were truly sincere; it was only a very delicate reproach for impolite conduct toward us. We are not at fault if the Telegraf accepted our welcome with incredulity; it has noted deceit, Pharisaism and many other similar endearing qualities in our sayings. That is not our fault. Any impartial person will acknowledge justice on our part.

    We have finally received some information as to why the Liberty League gives no evidence of its presence. The "Zgoda" press offers an explanation to the answer of the Committee ...

    Polish
    I F 2, II B 2 d 1, III B 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 11, 1892
    [Newly Organized Democratic Club] (Editorial)

    An important meeting of the newly organized Democratic club of the Sixteenth Ward will be held on June 12, 1892, in meeting hall no. 1 of the Polish school building, on Bradley Street. It is presumed that it is not necessary to encourage the citizens too emphatically in taking part in this meeting. We hope that the hall will be filled.

    Thus far, somehow, we have had no success with our political organizations. There were several trials, none had borne the desired fruits. Perhaps at this time it will be more favorable; we have learned a great deal, especially during the past year. The Poles have gained much experience and all the nationalities acknowledged that the Poles would be capable of occupying positions in municipal politics, if they were better organized.

    In the spring of last year we were most vitally interested in political affairs; a great deal was said and written about us here. In the fall 2nearly nothing was heard of us; in the spring of the following year, however, we suffered an enormous defeat, and it was shown here most conclusively how much we are in need of a good organization.

    During the spring of last year we have combined our whole strength, because, personally, we were most interested. It pertained to our candidates and we have solidly worked for their benefit. Then, everyone was interested in politics, everyone who was a citizen was proud of the fact that his vote amounted to something. In the fall we had no candidates; great was our indifference during the election as a result of this.

    In the spring of that year a controversy existed amongst us. Consequently, we were ignobly defeated.

    All this proves that we do not know how to participate in politics properly. When it pertains to our personal matters then we are temporarily excited but, when we are not interested personally, we do not speak. Is this proper?

    3

    We should comprehend that our interest does not merely consist in electing a few of our candidates to some office. We make part of the city, part of a community, part of a state, part of the American nation, and for that reason municipal, county, state, and national politics should always concern us. Our general welfare depends upon the returns of these elections, upon the statutes that are being enacted, and upon the gains or losses that result from the victory or defeat of the party in which we have always participated However, we do not know how to do that; we are only concerned with how some Poles will receive some position.

    For this reason a permanent policy necessary for us. By simply belonging to a political organization, we will learn to understand national politics and to take wise action in it. Then it will become easier to place our own candidates and assist in their election; then, the other nationalities would have to take us seriously.

    When a political club is organized it is our opinion that it would be well 4to hold most frequent meetings, called by this club, in order to clarify particular [issues] of national, state, county, and municipal politics by means of addresses, orations, and readings. Debates could also be conducted which would greatly help in clarifying the frequently involved and difficult questions. A more political club, whose members at a certain time would perhaps proceed in unity, but do not themselves know why they are doing so will not help. It is necessary to create a thorough understanding of the situation and make sure that every citizen gains a most adequate knowledge of various political questions.

    Let us, therefore, meet in council tomorrow afternoon, and let us gather in as great numbers as possible. Before this takes place, let us also give thought to what motions and propositions we are to present so that the organizers will meet with more success this time than previously.

    An important meeting of the newly organized Democratic club of the Sixteenth Ward will be held on June 12, 1892, in meeting hall no. 1 of the Polish school building, ...

    Polish
    I F 1, I F 2, I F 3, I F 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 13, 1892
    [The Polish-American Democratic Club] (Editorial)

    A meeting of the organizers of the Polish-American Democratic Club of the Sixteenth Ward was held yesterday. During the ensuing week it will perhaps become necessary to discuss this matter more thoroughly; we will only note here a short resume of yesterday's discussion.

    Citizen Adalbert Jendrzejek commenced the meeting; following this, John Arkuszewski was elected as temporary chairman and Stanley Szwajkart as secretary. In several orations some of the citizens indicated the need of organizing a club of this kind and they described what tasks this club would have to fulfill. It is about this that we will write in the following issues.

    It was agreed that the organizing club will be known as Polish-American 2Citizens of the 16th Ward Democratic Club. A general meeting will be called for the coming Sunday, June 19, at the hall of the Polish school at Bradley Street, for the purpose of future deliberation on the organizing of the club, the arrangement of the principal points of its constitution and, in general, to work out the particulars pertaining to the organization.

    The following citizens enrolled into the club: Adalbert Tomasik, Adalbert Jendrzejek, John Arkuszewski, Francis Murkowski, John Bednarek, Joseph Klatecki, John Lamczyk, Francis Maca, John Szczech, John Kortas, Jacob Mucha, Thomas Krolik, Joseph Paszkiewicz, Francis Fuhl, John Kaminski, John Laska, Theodore Ostrowski, Francis Wleklinski, Louis Roland, Szczesny Zahajkiewicz, Andrew Szperkowski, Michael Wolinski, Francis Kaczmarek, Anthony Rudnicki, August J. Kowalski, Stanley Kunz and Stanley Szwajkart.

    We kindly request all the Polish periodicals to repeat this report.

    A meeting of the organizers of the Polish-American Democratic Club of the Sixteenth Ward was held yesterday. During the ensuing week it will perhaps become necessary to discuss this matter ...

    Polish
    I F 2, I C