The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Narod Polski -- January 08, 1897
    [Problem of the Unemployed]

    Frank Dombrowski, unemployed, living on Dickson St., left his home in despair to see the county agent in regard to relief for his wife and four children.

    In his absence his wife received a letter from him advising her he was going to commit suicide in the lake. He however, did not commit suicide and decided it would be better to die of hunger than to take his life.

    His wife was left destitute with the oldest child 9 years old, and the youngest nine months. Friends collected a sum of money which was turned over to her. Peter Kiolbassa, a city official, stated there were many such cases.

    Mr. Dombrowski returned home and, when informed of state of affairs, left again. He reached a small town in Indiana, 34 miles from Chicago, and received temporary work. He worked ten days and with his earnings returned to his family. He thanked all who helped his family.

    Frank Dombrowski, unemployed, living on Dickson St., left his home in despair to see the county agent in regard to relief for his wife and four children. In his absence ...

    Polish
    I D 2 c, IV
  • Zgoda -- January 21, 1897
    A Plea to the General Public

    Many people are without employment at present, haven't anything to eat or clothe themselves with, are even led to suicide. It is very sad when you stop to consider it.

    Out of 150,000 Poles in Chicago a great number of them find themselves in this state, that they are hungry, without clothes and sick.

    We then take upon ourselves the responsibility and organize a "Chicago Aid and Relief Society" for those unfortunate ones. The committee requests those, who are more fortunate, to contribute to this task, as we know you all shall aid us in our work of good will toward destitute persons.

    Many people are without employment at present, haven't anything to eat or clothe themselves with, are even led to suicide. It is very sad when you stop to consider it. ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I B 3 c, I D 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 26, 1897
    An Appeal to the Polish Public (Correspondence)

    During the past four years the people of America, especially the Poles, have experienced trying times. How many people have taken their lives because of lack work--lack of bread? This is a sad thing to say but it is true, and present-day conditions are even worse.

    Of the hundred and fifty thousand Poles in Chicago, mostly of the working class, a majority find themselves in dire circumstances. How many families are suffering from cold and hunger? Over one half of the Polish population has no means by which to clothe itself--often going about begging. Similar situations are few in American annals. It is not a rare thing to find a family sustaining itself for a day or even for a week on a loaf of stale bread that it has managed to get or find....unclad children trying to keep warm by the waning fire in the stove.

    2

    One cannot look upon such conditions with indifference; one cannot wait for better times, but must, as quickly as possible, offer assistance to these destitute families who from day to day live in hunger and cold.

    At a meeting arranged by program committees of Polish societies on January 16, A. X. Centella made a motion to appoint a committee to collect contributions for the poor. The motion was unanimously adopted and the following were chosen:

    A. X. Centella, president, 43 Chapie Street,

    Edwin M. Dyniewicz, secretary and treasurer, 552 Noble Street,

    Jacob Slowikowski, 13 Crittenden Street,

    J. Kempczenski, 49 Emma Street,

    Nikodem Polcyn, 297 Wabansia Avenue,

    Alexander Nagawiecki, 458 Noble Street,

    M. Moszczynski, 87 W. Division Street.

    The above committee will make a list of all contributors, and their donations will be acknowledged in the local Polish papers.

    3

    Through the mediation of Mr. Centella, the committee came to an understanding with the Chicago Relief and Aid Society, and certificates are going to be issued to needy families and individuals, signed by the president and secretary of the above-mentioned Polish relief committee. The Chicago Relief and Aid Society will act upon the presentation of these certificates and assistance will be given to the person or persons presenting them.

    Certificates may be obtained by calling on the secretary, Edwin M. Dyniewicz, 552 Noble Street.

    It is anticipated that the Poles of Chicago and vicinity will support this drive to give succor to their destitute compatriots. Both material and financial help, no matter how small, will be gladly welcomed by the secretary. Act today! Your penny may aid some unfortunate family.

    Respectfully,

    The Committee,

    Edwin M. Dyniewicz,

    Secretary and Treasurer.

    4

    The following persons sent in contributions to the committee:

    Previous donations on hand $ 7.20
    Petru Importing Company 1.00
    John Szostakowski 1.00
    B. L. Maciejewski 1.00
    J. F. Dankowski 1.00
    Valentine Wleklinski 5.00
    Adam Blaszczynski 1.00
    Stanislaus Nicki 1.00
    F. Swierzynski 1.00
    L. Reisch .50
    S. A. Osada .25
    A. X. Centella 1.00
    King Miecislas Society 1.53
    Thomas Nalepinski 1.00
    Simon Wojtalewicz .50
    5
    C. W. D. $1.00
    Total $24.98

    Twenty-five dollars was sent to the Chicago Relief and Aid Society.

    During the past four years the people of America, especially the Poles, have experienced trying times. How many people have taken their lives because of lack work--lack of bread? This ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I D 2 c, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 30, 1897
    The Welfare Committe of the Fifteenth Ward

    We have just been informed by letter that the Polish Central Democratic Club of the Fifteenth Ward has organized a Welfare Committee for the purpose of raising funds to aid the destitute Poles of this ward. Arrangements have been made with the Cook County Relief Agent whereby needy families will be given assistance.

    The members of the committee are as follows: John Krajecki, 140 Hamburg Street, president; Albert Nowak, 265 West Webster Avenue, secretary; Stan. Fruzyna, 1020 North Robey Street, treasurer; F. Zarazinski, 277 West Webster Avenue; and Stan. Glomski, 893 Girard Street.

    All contributions will be acknowledged in the Polish press.

    An appeal to the public for assistance was also included in the letter; however, it was not published because it was similar to that of the Polish Welfare 2Association of the Sixteenth Ward.

    Poverty statements will be issued by Albert Nowak, secretary, 265 West Webster Avenue.

    Tomorrow, Sunday, at 4 P. M., a meeting will be held at the St. Hedwig Parish School Hall. The committee invites all Poles of the Fifteenth Ward to attend.

    We have just been informed by letter that the Polish Central Democratic Club of the Fifteenth Ward has organized a Welfare Committee for the purpose of raising funds to aid ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I D 2 c, I F 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 30, 1897
    An Appeal by the Polish Welfare Association of Sixteenth Ward

    Compatriots! The unemployment situation has been with us for such a long time that there is not one person who is not aware of its gravity. In times of depression thousands of families are rendered destitute, for the hands that earned the bread are idle. With the sudden stoppage of funds even the bare necessities of life are beyond their reach.

    The recent cold wave has rendered the situation more pitiable. Our unfortunate compatriots crowd the offices of the Cook County Relief Agent, welfare associations, and goodwill committees, while others go from door to door begging for something to eat.

    It often happens that their walking, searching, and begging is fruitless. The commissioners of the County Relief Agent and directors of welfare institutions are of other nationalities and do not understand our predicament. Many times a poverty-stricken Pole is turned away while others who are more aggressive and 2more forward, get aid, although they do not deserve it.

    It is the duty of the Poles during these critical times to prevent unworthy people from getting relief, as is prevalent at present, and to make an effort to have our destitute people who are really in need, get the necessary assistance.

    Realizing the necessity for such activity, a large group of Poles of the Sixteenth Ward have organized the Polish Welfare Association of the Sixteenth Ward. A committee, whose duty it will be to raise funds and give help to our Polish brethren in distress, was formed of outstanding Polish leaders. This group will make every effort to assist our poor and needy people.

    Such work can prove invaluable if the Welfare Association receives the necessary support from the citizens of this ward.

    We invite the priests of the two parishes to lend their support to our efforts. All Polish societies are cordially invited to offer their assistance in this 3noble work. All businessmen are urged to offer whatever help possible.

    Tomorrow, Sunday, January 31, a mass meeting will be held at the Polish Hall, Bradley and Noble Streets. The aims of the Welfare Association will be fully explained. All Polish citizens of the Sixteenth Ward are urged to attend the meeting and offer a helping hand to their needy compatriots.

    Sincerely,

    The Committee of the Polish Welfare Association of

    the Sixteenth Ward,

    Peter Kiolbassa, president,

    Victor Bardonski, vice president,

    F. Bieszki, treasurer,

    T. Gordon, secretary.

    Compatriots! The unemployment situation has been with us for such a long time that there is not one person who is not aware of its gravity. In times of depression ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I D 2 c, III A, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 01, 1897
    Welfare Meeting Held at St. Hedwig Parish by Poles of Fifteenth Ward

    A mass meeting of the Poles of the Fifteenth ward was held yesterday afternoon at the St. Hedwig school hall, for the purpose of rendering aid to the destitute Polish families of this ward. At 4 P.M. the president of the Welfare Committee, John Krajecki, opened the meeting. The Reverend John Piechowski, pastor of St. Hedwig Church, was appointed chairman and Peter J. Lama, recording secretary.

    In a few words, the pastor explained the aim of the gathering and expressed his gratification that the citizens of this ward were taking a vital interest in helping the poor.

    At a earlier mass meeting, held on January 17, a resolution was adopted, a copy of which was sent to the Bureau of Associated Charities. At yesterday's mass meeting this resolution, and a reply from the Bureau of Associated 2Charities, were read. This was followed by an open discussion in which the following took part; W. Obecny, F. Sobieszczyk, A. Nowak, J. Nowicki, John Krajecki, Michael Osuch, and many others.

    A motion to take up a collection for the destitute was made by the Reverend Piechowski and was accepted unanimously. The contributors and their contributions were as follows:

    Reverend John Piechowski $5.00
    J. Serzewski 1.00
    J. Nowicki 1.00
    Leon Sankiewicz 1.00
    W. Obecny 2.00
    Stanley Morkowski .35
    Albert Nowak 2.00
    W. Glowczewski .50
    J. Konczykowski 2.00
    3
    W. Zasowski $.50
    F. Sobieszczyki 1.50
    B. Hoffman 1.00
    Michael Osuch 2.00
    John Jozwiak .50
    Anonymous .25
    F. Michela 1.00
    Anthony Slupikowski 1.00
    Total $22.60

    It was agreed to send twenty dollars to the Welfare Bureau, and that further donations should be sent either to the St. Hedwig Parish rectory or to Albert Nowak, Webster and Seeley Avenues.

    It was also agreed that the Reverend John Piechowski should be a member of the committee and that the committee should take care of the collections.

    4

    The next meeting will be held Sunday, February 7. A suggestion was also made before closing, that this organization be called the "Welfare Society of St. Hedwig Parish".

    All those in need of help are requested to call at the office of Albert Nowak, Webster and Seeley Avenues. He will issue certificates from the Welfare Bureau of Chicago.

    Peter J. Lama.

    A mass meeting of the Poles of the Fifteenth ward was held yesterday afternoon at the St. Hedwig school hall, for the purpose of rendering aid to the destitute Polish ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I D 2 c, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 24, 1897
    Initial Accomplishments of the Polish Welfare Association of the Sixteenth Ward

    From a report received from T. Gordon, Secretary of the Committee of the Welfare Association of the Sixteenth Ward, we learn that the Committee collected $186.15. Of this sum $128.70 was used to purchase 176 pairs of shoes, and $43.38 was spent for boys' clothing. The remainder of the money was put in the treasury.

    At the same time the committee received donations of articles valued at $270. Receipt of these items was acknowledged from time to time in the Dziennik Chicagoski.

    The committee gave help to 135 families, giving the purchased articles to school children. It distributed 170 pairs of shoes, 56 suits for boys, 34 pairs of trousers for boys, 6 pairs of trousers for men, 51/2 dozen socks, material for dresses and blouses, 162 loaves of bread, one case of rolled cats, 2one basket of bakery goods, and one half ton of coal.

    Considering the fact that the Polish Welfare Association of the Sixteenth Ward was organized on January 27, the service it has rendered in less than a month is remarkable.

    But this effort only partly alleviates the suffering. Poverty and dire conditions are prevalent amid our people. Such conditions should force us to make a more concentrated effort to assist them, for only in this way will we be able to help our destitute compatriots.

    From a report received from T. Gordon, Secretary of the Committee of the Welfare Association of the Sixteenth Ward, we learn that the Committee collected $186.15. Of this sum $128.70 ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I D 2 c
  • Zgoda -- August 05, 1897
    In the Affair of the Pulaski Hall in Chicago, Illinois a Plea to All Polish Societies and Organizations and in General to All Poles in the United States

    Fellowmen:

    Five years have already elapsed since the time when the assembly of Polish citizens of Chicago, prompted by the sincere love for their fatherland and homage toward our hero, Casimir Pulaski, companion of Kosciuszko, who also fought for the liberty of this country, decided to erect a monument to him.

    One idea was added to another and it was decided to build a magnificent Polish national home, embellishing the front of this structure with the bust of our hero.

    This was done. The idea was supported greatly by everyone and today this beautiful home, the Pulaski Hall, stands and gives shelter to the Polish 2minds and Polish songs. Our fellowmen gather here every evening, the Falcons and the Polish youth drill here with body and soul.

    In the early beginning the enthusiasm toward this affair was great. Fellowmen gave donations, lodged their small funds for the Pulaski Hall and we then thought that this monument which would be the great pride of our nation in America, would be easily paid for.

    But alas! there came hard times after the building of this structure had already begun, no one foresaw that this would happen. Banks began to fail, creating a financial panic that spread and is spreading to this day, people lost and are losing their entire wealth.

    Amidst these hard times, organizations are presenting fewer shows and other various festivities, the hall naturally remains vacant at all times, remains worthless. And now the interest on the bank loans must be paid up, shareholders must be paid out, debts on this or that have to be paid.

    3

    Expenses are becoming so much greater, the income decreasing each new day.... If it were the good old times, this monument of Pulaski would have been paid for by now without any financial struggle, we would not have to turn toward you people then in this financial need. But in the presence of the above-mentioned fact, in view of the fact that times are not getting any better, that the Polish colony in Chicago is poor, and also in the light of the fact that hundreds of thousands of our fellow-men are faced with unemployment, we are forced to make a plea to the generality of the nation, all the Polish organizations and societies in the United States, and cry in a loud voice:

    "Fellowmen! save the monument of our hero! Save the Pulaski Hall in Chicago!"

    We cannot permit this monument to slip from our Polish hands, and let the Jews or any other nationality gain possession of this. It would be disgraceful for us if this were admitted.

    4

    The Pulaski monument in the hands of others, that would be disgrace for us!

    The Pulaski monument should and must be the possession of the Poles. We have a strong faith and also a strong conviction that you will not permit it to come to this, dear fellowmen, the degradation of our character in general.

    So we then turn toward you, fellowmen, in the name of our nation, in the name of the ones dearest to you, in the name of the honor that you have for the memory of Pulaski, save this monument! Your smallest offerings will be greatly appreciated. If only every Pole in America would set aside one cent toward this aim, the Pulaski Hall would be saved.

    We request all of the papers to publish our plea.

    Attention: Send your donations to: Vincent Jaworski, 861 South Ashland avenue. For ten-dollar shares in the Pulaski Hall, report to the secretary of the Pulaski Hall, Mr. S. Lauferski, 654 W. 18th place.

    Fellowmen: Five years have already elapsed since the time when the assembly of Polish citizens of Chicago, prompted by the sincere love for their fatherland and homage toward our hero, ...

    Polish
    II D 6, II C, I D 2 c, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1903
    Poles in America

    The Kurjer Polski states:

    "Some persons enjoy themselves joyfully in elaborate places, while others are dying on the streets from hunger and sufferings. This very incident occurred on one of our streets, here in the city. An unidentified Pole dying from hunger.

    "Who he was and where he comes from no on knows and naturally no one will find out. He was seen on the street shivering from the cold, also hungry but still no one cared or could imagine what he needed because this poor soul, not knowing how to speak English, could not explain to others that he was hungry.

    "He was met by policeman Stephenson. Pointing his finger toward his stomach said in a feeble voice, "I am hungry." The policeman not knowing what he was talking about went on his way. While he stood there, and when he started to walk on further his legs gave in, his eyes got misty, his head was in a whirl; hunger had gotten the best of him. A stranger passing by put the dying man's hands on his chest and placed him near the 2street curb on Elm street. Policeman Stephenson with his associates thinking they had a drunken man to deal with took him into a pig-sty. As they held him in their arms he muttered feebly, "I am hungry," gasped deeply and died.

    So a Pole starved to death probably away from his family and friends who may live in Poland. Leaving his country, seeking wealth and happiness over here, and to his misfortune finding hunger and death."

    The Kurjer Polski states: "Some persons enjoy themselves joyfully in elaborate places, while others are dying on the streets from hunger and sufferings. This very incident occurred on one of ...

    Polish
    I D 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 07, 1904
    The Polish Daily News. Polish People Migrating to Washington.

    Today the first group of Polish people are migrating to the states of Washington and Oregon. They will receive free, tracts of land which they are to cultivate and live on. The reason for this migration is; the working man cannot make a living in the over populated city, there is a lack of work, and the wages were cut.

    The Polish people were raised on farms, therefore they are more adapted to farm life. Many more are following their example.

    A group of Poles will leave every month for Washington and Oregon, to start small town or communities best suited for themselves. In charge of this migration movement are Mr. Ossowski and Mr. Bednarek.

    Today the first group of Polish people are migrating to the states of Washington and Oregon. They will receive free, tracts of land which they are to cultivate and live ...

    Polish
    I L, I D 2 c