The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Zgoda -- July 31, 1889
    From the Central Government

    The secretary of the Polish Union Organization informs us that among our fellow men who work in the mines there is a strike bringing poverty to them and their families.

    So, for this reason the central government of the Polish Union Organization appeals to our fellow men's hearts in the United States, begging them to make a donation, if able to do it.

    The ill fate that befell them today might happen to us tomorrow, so let us help now, and in the future let us pray that our plea for help shall not be rejected.

    The secretary of the Polish Union Organization informs us that among our fellow men who work in the mines there is a strike bringing poverty to them and their families. ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 05, 1892
    The Poles Furnish a Large Conningent for the Democratic Army Mass-Meeting in St.Stanislaus School

    The Polish people of Chicago are just as loyal now to the Democratic Party, as they ever have been. This was clearly demonstrated in recent weeks by the mass-meetings, which were held in the different Polish districts. Only one Republican meeting took place during this campaign in the Polish district, which is bounded by Milwaukee, North, Ashland, and Chicago Avenues, and the river. This respective meeting was held in Ward's Hall, close to the 14th ward, and was attended almost exclusively by people of the 14th ward.

    Fully 4000 Polish voters have been registered in the 16th ward. Of the 505 voters of the 18th precinct of the same ward only two are Irish, and one is a German, all the other 502 are Polish. These 502 Poles will vote as one man for the Democratic Party, as a prominent Polish citizen assured us. Similar conditions prevail in other Polish districts. Under the auspices of the Polish Democratic Clubs, a mass-meeting was held last night in the St. Stanislaus School, which was attended by approximately 1000 Polish voters. About three weeks ago a similar mass-meeting was held in the same building, and was attended by about 6000 Polish voters. Since most of these citizens belong to the laboring class, it is difficult to induce them to attend a political meeting on working days.

    2

    The Rev. W. Barzynski, Mr. Kunz, Kowalski and Piotrowski, delivered speeches in Polish, which were received with much applause. The Polish Democratic Club had thousands of copies of the Edward Law printed and distributed among the Poles. With it, a splendid explanation of the law and its effect was given. This excellent campaign literature has done an effective work among the Polish voters. The speakers explained the issues of this election quite thoroughly.

    Ex-Alderman Kowalski made the following statement: "Andrew Carnegie persuaded his men four years ago to vote the Republican ticket, assuring them that the Republican tariff system could bring them advantage only. But what were these advantages! We saw that last year, in Homestead; when his men expected a raise in wages, they were told to accept a reduction instead. Those who tried to oppose his plans and defend their rights, were shot down by Pinkerton's detectives. Such and similar kinds, are the blessings of the high-tariff system." Judge Yanin gave an excellent address about the tariff problem.

    Rev. Barzynski spoke about the compulsory school law. He urged the audience to vote, on the day of election, and not to stay away on account of fear of losing their jobs. Judge Altgeld had promised to appear, but another engagement prevented him from doing so. However, he is certain of the Polish voters. The Poles will prove again next Tuesday that they are good Democrats.

    The Polish people of Chicago are just as loyal now to the Democratic Party, as they ever have been. This was clearly demonstrated in recent weeks by the mass-meetings, which ...

    Polish
    I F 1, I F 2, I F 4, I D 2 a 4, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 20, 1892
    What Have the Poles Gained from the Strike at Homestead? (Editorial)

    We have pointed out several times with bitterness that the Carnegie Company at Homestead, opposing the workers who were on strike, was looking for scabs to replace the strikers and that several hundred Poles responded and were hired.

    It is difficult to demand that every Polish worker in America join a labor organization and support the unions' fight against capitalism. In many places such conditions exist that this is impossible. But certainly those who work as non-union workers should not take part in this battle by working as scabs, by replacing a striking worker and siding with the manufacturer to their own inevitable disadvantage. Such action is especially unjustified at Homestead, where the dispute between the workers and the capitalists has reached an extreme point of irritation.

    2

    We are not concerned with the economic side of the question, but we are complaining about the action from the citizens' point of view. The Polish worker temporarily profits by accepting employment in a company where a strike exists, but he in turn helps to bring about lower wages and the deterioration of the American worker's standing. And he does, above all, draw upon himself the racial hatred of the American worker, a hatred which is being strongly and widely felt in labor organizations.

    This hatred falls upon all the Poles in America and is the cause of the bitterness against us. This was often pointed out. We wish, however, to point out once more that the temporary profit of the workers who replaced the strikers is not an advantage to them.

    The incident at Homestead is a good example. Out of the several hundred Polish scabs who were employed by the Carnegie Company, several were injured because of the lack of knowledge of the machinery which they had to operate. Many 3of them were beaten by the strikers. A couple of them were victims of poisonings. Finally, according to a worker's dispatch to the Pittsburgh Przy Jaciela Ludu (People's Friend), all the scabs were replaced when the strikers returned to their jobs.

    This is their entire gain. They were the tools which were used to an immediate advantage and then discarded. For many months they will be in search of work .... and will be shoved about. The only thing that will remain for them is the hatred of the American worker and the name of "scab".

    This lesson ought to convince the Polish-American workers once and for all that, as strangers who come to this country to seek material gain through employment, they ought to side with the masses of American workingpeople--and not stick their fingers between the doors, especially when they can be quite sure that their fingers will be injured.

    We have pointed out several times with bitterness that the Carnegie Company at Homestead, opposing the workers who were on strike, was looking for scabs to replace the strikers and ...

    Polish
    I H, I D 2 a 2, I D 2 a 4, I D 1 a
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 10, 1893
    Polish Strike

    One of our readers, Mr. J. S., of 17th Street, informs us that the employees of the Davidson Marble Company, among whom are more than a hundred Poles, have been on strike for the past week and a half. The strikers demand $2.25 for nine hours of work. Until a few days ago, the strike was entirely peaceful, but when the workers discovered that the factory was employing other men in their places, they picketed the street corners and prevented anyone from approaching the building. The new workmen, returning from the factory, were pursued and beaten. Three men were seriously injured, one of them losing an eye in a fist fight. There was no more violence on the following day.

    The strike was instigated by the Irish, while the strikers are nearly all Poles. Mr. J. S., who is himself employed in the factory, states that, in the face of the present unemployment, the strike cannot possibly be successful. He maintains that the best thing the Poles could do would be to go back to work.

    One of our readers, Mr. J. S., of 17th Street, informs us that the employees of the Davidson Marble Company, among whom are more than a hundred Poles, have been ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, II A 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 13, 1893
    The Slaughter of Poles in Lemont (Editorial)

    As we promised yesterday, we are returning to the revolting "slaughter" of Polish strikers in Lemont, Illinois. It is our opinion that this matter demands the attention of our American Polonia. We should protest loudly against the crimes committee with uncontrolled ferocity upon the poor and uneducated Poles of Lemont, in the conviction that they cannot defend themselves and that such crimes will escape punishment. We must see to it to it that these crimes are punished, swiftly and severely.

    News of the things that are happening in Lemont appears elsewhere in this paper. The latest reports convince us that swift action against the perpetrators is, at this time, out of the question. The authorities are helpless; it may be that they do not consider themselves legally empowered to intercede. The strikers have neither the means nor a sufficient knowledge 2to take any steps. The most wronged are either dying or are on beds of pain, struggling against poverty and suffering. On the other hand, the Millionaire contractors will stop at nothing to keep the matter quiet and to prevent justice from being done.

    If we, the Poles of Illinois, do not intercede in behalf of our countrymen, their wrongs will be unavenged; and boldened by impunity, the criminals will next turn their guns upon us.

    What, then, ought we to do? What is our duty in this case?

    The answer to these questions lies in the affair itself. We ought to call mass meetings here in Chicago and in other Polish settlements, "indignation meetings" at which appropriate resolutions can be formulated. These resolutions must next be submitted to the governor of Illinois and to the legislature. It would also be desirable to appoint a citizens' committee which 3would go to Lemont to investigate the matter more thoroughly; this same committee could undertake the necessary steps to bring the perpetrators of the crimes to justice. The duty of this committee, consisting of organization representatives and lawyers, would be to see to it that justice be done in the proper measure. As we know, the strikers in Lemont have already formed a committee whose members are of various nationalities. Our committee would co-operate with the strikers' committee. Thus, the way is obvious and leads directly to its object. In our opinion, steps similar to those above mentioned are imperative.

    A protest against violence will prove that we will not allow ourselves to be murdered like lambs. We should approve of such a protest, as Poles and workers, against the violators of law and liberty. When we will have been able to bring about the punishment of wrong-doers, we will then have proved that we are strong enough to stand in defense of our rights as human beings and as citizens. But this is only half of our task.

    4

    Another equally important duty of ours is to bring aid to the poor people upon whom this misfortune has fallen. The citizens' committee should take care of this matter also. Our brethren will not begrudge the few pennies that will bring relief to their countrymen who suffer through no fault of their own. Naturally, an investigation is necessary to determine the extent of need; only then will contributions be solicited. On this question, the Polish citizens of Lemont should take the initiative.

    At any rate, we mention our duties again: to protest against the slaughter of our brothers in Lemont, to see justice done, and to aid the unfortunate victims. These duties should be fulfilled.

    As we promised yesterday, we are returning to the revolting "slaughter" of Polish strikers in Lemont, Illinois. It is our opinion that this matter demands the attention of our American ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, II D 10, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 14, 1893
    Coroner's Inquest into the Death of Gregory Kiszka

    Lemont, June 13. A coroner's inquest was held today into the murder of Gregory Kiszka by persons employed by the contractors. According to the testimony of witnesses, it was undoubtedly a cold-blooded murder, entirely unprovoked by the strikers.

    Coroner McHale of Cook County presided....

    Witnesses testified that Kiszka and a few other strikers were walking toward Romeo, there to meet with other strikers to discuss possibilities of returning to work. As they passed the place at which subcontractor Locker's men were working, fifteen or twenty men, armed with rifles, fired at them. The strikers were unarmed, and it must. be added, were several hundred yards away from the place at which the work was being done. As the strikers fled, their attackers, mostly Negroes, pursued them, killing and wounding those within range of their rifles. Kiszka hid in some bushes. One of the pursuers, evidently their leader, ran up to the hidden man and fired from a distance 2of not more than four feet. Anthony Kozminski, a witness, testified that the man fired at Kiszka from a distance of only a few feet. Upon request, he described the murderer as a powerfully built man with red hair and whiskers. As Kozminski described him, a murmur arose in the room; a number of people knew such a man. Someone wrote his name on a piece of paper and handed it to the coroner. After reading it, the coroner conferred for a moment with Supervisor Weimar and then resumed the hearing. Among the other witnesses who testified were Mrs. Kiszka, and Hettinger, another striker. Martin Dorch, a deputy sheriff of Will County, whose duty it had been to keep watch on the strikers, was also called to the stand. While his testimony showed that he desired to defend the contractors, he made several compromising statements. He said that he warned the strikers to stay away, for the contractors had armed their men. He admitted also that Matthews and the contractor Locker, carried guns, and had a band of armed men. As the strikers passed, the band attacked them. Dorch himself remained on the sidelines, but Attenhouse, another deputy sheriff, assisted the attackers and even figured in the arrest of forty-seven striking workmen.

    3

    The coroner continued the inquest until Friday, on which day the persons accused of the crime will be called to the stand. Anyone who fails to appear will be arrested.

    It is certain now that the name of Kiszka's murderer is known. The evidence against him is so clear that he should be arrested any day.

    Lemont, June 13. A coroner's inquest was held today into the murder of Gregory Kiszka by persons employed by the contractors. According to the testimony of witnesses, it was undoubtedly ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 16, 1893
    Tragic Results of Labor Clash in Lemont

    We have just received the latest news from Lemont, Illinois, where a clash occurred a week ago in which a number of our unfortunate countrymen fell. We learn from Mr. E., who has just returned from Lemont, of the death of the second victim, the seventeen-year-old boy Kluga. Among those who have little chance for recovery are the Poles Jaskulski (bullet in side, not yet removed), Kolarz (bullet in thigh, also not removed), Wesolowski, Wojtanowski, and others. The medical attention they have had has been entirely inadequate. Great poverty reigns in the homes of the victims; for instance, the aged parents of Kluga are now without any means of support; others fare as badly.

    John C. Willand, a Pole, Sergeant in Company E, Second Batallion, Second Regiment of the Illinois National Guard, who was in Lemont with his Company from Tuesday to Friday, assures us that the Poles were victims of a wanton attack by the contractor. He had at first exploited them in the worst possible way and finally had imported Negroes from Georgia to replace them.

    2

    Sergeant Willand also assures us that the Poles of Lemont are a hard-working, peaceful people....held in good repute by the town of Lemont.

    The unfortunate victims are very much in need of aid, and it is our duty to give it to them. Two of our local physicians, Doctors Janczewski and Kodis, will leave for Lemont within the next few days to administer medical aid.

    This is not enough, however. At least a small sum of money ought to be sent to Lemont to satisfy the victims' immediate needs. We appeal to the Polish workingmen--our duty to national brotherhood and labor unity calls for offerings!

    We have just received the latest news from Lemont, Illinois, where a clash occurred a week ago in which a number of our unfortunate countrymen fell. We learn from Mr. ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, II D 10, II A 2
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 17, 1893
    Poles Protest Lemont Strike Atrocitles Mass Meeting Monday

    The matter concerning the Poles who were victims of the vicious attack in Lemont, Illinois, has entered upon the course suggested by Dziennik Chicagoski in a recent article. The Poles of Chicago realize that it is their duty to protest against this criminal attack and to bring the perpetrators to justice; at the same time, relief will be given the poverty-stricken victims.

    A temporary committee has issued the following appeal:

    "The awful occurrences in Lemont, Illinois, on Friday, June 9, should have touched the heart of every Pole. Through no fault of their own, our countrymen were barbarously assaulted, while seeking to improve their living conditions by legal means. Already two Poles are dead, victims of this atrocity; many more are injured. All of them are in direst need. In view of these circumstances, we, a group of local citizens, have decided to call a mass meeting, 2to be held at the School Hall near Bradley Street at 7:30 Monday evening. The crimes of the contractors call for a vigorous protest on our part; it is also necessary that we determine the most effective way of helping our brethren in their present need. Finally, we owe acknowledgment to the governor of this state for his public defense of right and justice. The matter is now quite widely known--it has been publicized in all the newspapers. The Poles of Chicago are in duty bound to take active interest for their own good. We have hopes that our countrymen will attend this meeting as one man."

    These eloquent words need no addition. We can only support the committee by urging co-operation.

    The matter concerning the Poles who were victims of the vicious attack in Lemont, Illinois, has entered upon the course suggested by Dziennik Chicagoski in a recent article. The Poles ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, II D 10
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 17, 1893
    Aid for the Strike Victims in Lemont

    As a result of notices appearing in Dziennik Chicagoski, a collection for the strike victims in Lemont has already been started. To date, the total donations, including five dollars from the Polish Publishing Company, amount to twelve dollars and fifty cents. We appeal for further donations. Each donation will be recorded in this paper and sent on to Lemont. We repeat: God will remember every offering for the relief of the unfortunate.

    As a result of notices appearing in Dziennik Chicagoski, a collection for the strike victims in Lemont has already been started. To date, the total donations, including five dollars from ...

    Polish
    II D 10, I D 2 a 4
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- June 20, 1893
    Meeting to Aid Polish Strike Victims in Lemont Mass Meeting to Be Held Sunday, June 25

    The matter of bringing aid to the strike victims in Lemont, Illinois, is taking shape according to the program outlined in a recent issue of Dziennik Chicagoski. Although the attendance at yesterday's meeting was rather small, it achieved some very important results. The following is a report of the meeting by the committee's secretary, H. Nagiel.

    "In accordance with the announcement made by the temporary committee, organized for the purpose of bringing aid to and defending the rights of the Polish strike victims in Lemont, Illinois, a meeting of Chicago Poles was held in the School Hall in St. Stanislaus parish on Monday, June 19. About a hundred and fifty Poles attended. The meeting was opened by the Reverend Vincent Barzynski, who explained its purpose. He pointed out the necessity of protesting against the crimes committed in Lemont, of bringing the perpetrators to justice, and, at the same time, of giving 2material aid to the innocent victims. This is demanded of us both by any intelligent comprehension of national solidarity and by Christian instincts. In concluding his address, Father Barzynski called upon E. Z. Brodowski to preside over the meeting, naming the undersigned [H. Nagiel] as secretary. Mr. Brodowski repeated the purposes of the meeting and asked for a general discussion. Father Barzynski, A. W. Rudnicki, H. Nagiel, and others spoke, arriving at the conclusion that an executive committee should be formed, which would investigate the matter thoroughly. In view of the emergency, it is necessary also to take up a collection at the earliest possible time, and of course, to call another meeting which would be attended not by hundreds but by thousands of Poles.

    "Dr. Janczewski, who has just returned to Chicago after two days in Lemont, reviewed the conditions as he found them. He explained that the victims of the assault and their families are living amidst the direst poverty and that they lack proper medical care. Two of them, Jaskulski and Wojtanowski, need surgical attention; since it was impossible to perform the necessary 3operations in Lemont, Dr. Janczewski arranged for them to be moved to Chicago, where they would be placed in a hospital at the committee's expense. The doctor asked the gathering to take care of these two unfortunates.

    "On a motion by Rudnicki, Maciontek, and Biniak, it was decided that an executive committee be named, and that the necessary collection be taken up. J. Mucha, E. Z. Brodowski, A. Kdinski, T. Krolik, Maciontek, A. W. Rudnicki, and J. Biniak made up the committee. The committee was made a permanent one and was instructed to go to Lemont for a close investigation of the matter, to raise the necessary funds for the relief of suffering there, and to arrange for the hospitalization of Jaskulski and Wojtanowski, who will arrive in Chicago today.

    "The collection, taken up immediately after the committee had been named, yielded $44.40.

    4

    "In conclusion, it was decided that a mass meeting be held at this same hall on Sunday, June 25, at 7:30 in the evening. Appropriate resolutions will be presented for this meeting to vote upon. The chairman named Father Barzynski, Judge [M. A.] La Buy, and H. Nagiel to formulate resolutions. With this, the meeting was closed. An earnest desire was evinced by those gathered to render all possible aid to their stricken brethren; the best proof of the sincerity of this desire was shown in the generosity with which contributions were made to the collection.

    H. Nagiel"

    As we can see from the above report, the project is now well under way. If the committee takes action immediately--and we do not doubt that it will--the general public will lend its support. Our Polish public always responds readily to an appeal for a worthy cause.

    The executive committee organized itself after the general meeting had closed.

    5

    A. W. Rudnicki was elected chairman; T. Krolik, secretary; and J. Mucha, treasurer. Krolik and Maciontek took upon themselves the duty of seeing that the wounded men, Jaskulski and Wojtanowski, are taken care of properly. E. Z. Brodowski and T. Krolik were delegated to go to Lemont to determine the exact state of affairs among the strike victims. The treasurer of the committee, J. Mucha, received the sum of $44.40 from the chairman and secretary of the general meeting.

    The matter of bringing aid to the strike victims in Lemont, Illinois, is taking shape according to the program outlined in a recent issue of Dziennik Chicagoski. Although the attendance ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4, II D 10, IV