The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 13, 1893
    Polish Entertainment (Editorial)

    In the last issue of the Pittsburgh Przyjaciel Ludu (Friend of the People], the following item appeared:

    "Last Saturday there was a bit of music in the home of a certain F. Figiel..... At about midnight, the guests became so noisy and disorderly that the host asked them to leave. A few of them took offense and a brawl resulted, in which Figiel was wounded in the chest with a knife. The wound is deep but not fatal. The attacker, who hid under a bed in panic, was arrested by the police and held pending trial."

    Also, the latest issue of the Baltimore Polonia carries this item from Warren, Massachusetts:

    "A Polish wedding took place here, at which almost all of the local Polish 2colony was present. Until midnight, six barrels of beer were consumed; then a brawl started. Knives and hatchets came into action and a near-riot ensued. The hand of Jacob Augustyn was almost hacked off, and Joseph Golen was wounded in the face. The chief offenders, Golen and Komiski, were arrested and will be duly punished."

    These two items are only samples of what can be regularly found in this or that Polish-American newspaper. It is deplorable news. It seems to prove that many of our countrymen who have come to this free land do not attempt to raise themselves to the level of true American civilization. That civilization depends, among other things, upon observance of laws, peaceableness, and temperance. Some of our countrymen cannot seem to enjoy themselves except by starting with liquor and ending with a brawl.

    The results of these incidents are very unpleasant to us. Disturbances caused by a few cast an unpleasant reflection on all of us and create a very unfavorable opinion of Poles in general, to say nothing of the sin 3against God and the damage to health and property, for these are obvious to everybody.

    These violent methods of entertainment among the Poles in America must be brought to an end. Drunkenness, scandals, and brawls ought to cease. The Polish newspapers, priests, and societies ought to take a strong stand on this problem. Let us severely condemn all such outbreaks, let us never cease repeating that such outbreaks are scandalous and harmful and that they must stop. Let serious people teach the youth, wives their husbands, and parents their children the infamy of entertainment which leads to bestiality and crime, and surely there will be some results.

    No one denies anyone else the right to decent entertainment. One can dance and enjoy oneself and drink a glass of beer on occasion; but to drink like swine and to engage in subsequent brawls with knives and hatchets is a sin, a disgrace, and a crime.

    In the last issue of the Pittsburgh Przyjaciel Ludu (Friend of the People], the following item appeared: "Last Saturday there was a bit of music in the home of a ...

    Polish
    I B 1, II E 3, I C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- December 13, 1893
    From the Orphanage

    The Brotherhood of Temperance has donated fifty dollars to the orphans.

    The orphans sincerely thank the donors with a hearty God bless you.

    The Brotherhood of Temperance has donated fifty dollars to the orphans. The orphans sincerely thank the donors with a hearty God bless you.

    Polish
    II D 4, I B 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 02, 1895
    Final Steps Taken at Mass Meeting Relative to 1895, a Year of Polish National Mourning

    Yesterday, the first day of 1895, the last steps were taken relative to the method of commemorating 1895 as a year of national mourning throughout St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish at a mass meeting held in the Polish Hall, Bradley and Noble Streets. Several hundred Polish people of the community attended.

    The assembly was opened by Reverend Vincent Barzynski, pastor of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, who acted as chairman; Mr. Steltman acted as recording secretary.

    Reverend Barzynski, who was the initial speaker, pointed out the aims of the meeting. "A hundred years ago we were torn asunder by our enemies," said the pastor, "and here in America, the land of freedom, we are separating ourselves by harboring discord and hatred, dividing into various factions, fighting among ourselves, and wasting the national feeling. Therefore we should carry out a twofold program of mourning! And this is not to be a mourning of groans 2and outward demontrations, but one of action. Work toward the national cause, unity, sorrow for the faults, strong desire for education--these are to be its aims," Reverend Barzynski concluded.

    "It is not necessary for us to wear any mark of mourning", stated Szczesny Zahajkiewicz, the second speaker of the evening, "but all that is necessary is a sincere sorrow in our hearts. There is need for work among our Polish youth in America; for it requires moral instructions as well as knowledge about Poland. This can be the greatest monument offered to our country a century after her fall, during this year of sorrow. We need to establish evening and Sunday schools, organize our youth, and give it the ten commandments of love for the fatherland," he avered.

    The Polish youth was called upon by Mr. Skaryszewski to safeguard its native tongue and spirit.

    The rearing of our youth was discussed by Ignacy Kowalski. He pointed out the influence that can be exerted by the parents--and called upon the parents to keep a careful watch over their children. He urged the parents to see that 3their children fulfill the duties of the school, watch their after-school activity and set up organizations for them.

    Henry Nagiel in his talk urged the people to be generous in support of the Polish League, which fosters Polish culture, especially the development of reading rooms, libraries and national publications.

    A short speech was also given by W. Pyterek, who urged the people to commemorate this coming year, and educate our children. "Our youth is the key which some day will open the locks of our shackles, they are the tools which will cast aside the heavy stones of bondage. The white eagle will then fly and Poland will awaken," said Mr. Pyterek.

    Peter Kiolbassa was the final speaker to take the stand. He summarized the important points of the previous speakers, and gave a plan as to how to observe 1895 as a year of mourning. He especially hoped that the Polish people would strive to eradicate undesirable activities and drunkenness among the Polish people at large, and support education.

    4

    The following resolution was adopted:

    "We, the Polish people, who are gathered at a mass meeting held on January 1, 1895, resolve to:

    "1. Observe 1895 as a year of national mourning through the accumulation of strength and the elevation of the spirit, unity, harmony, and national work; further, by avoiding undesirable and demoralizing activity and striving to avoid scandals; finally, by thriftiness and by supporting general public causes--and to convene once a month relative to our work for the national cause.

    "2. Work during the course of this year of national mourning by striving for the awakening of our faith and the moral and cultural development of our youth through the organization of evening and Sunday schools, and the creation of youth organizations with the support of parents and guardians.

    "3. Especially contribute toward the support of education, and, above all, 5help to establish Polish libraries and reading rooms, arrange lectures and support Polish publications printed in America.

    Yesterday, the first day of 1895, the last steps were taken relative to the method of commemorating 1895 as a year of national mourning throughout St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish at ...

    Polish
    III B 3 a, II B 2 f, I B 3 b, III B 2, I B 1, III A, III C, III E, III H, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 15, 1895
    Polish Society Donates Ten Dollars to the Holy Family Orphanage

    The Temperance Society of St. John Cantius Parish, through its secretary, Peter Bocian, contributed ten dollars to the Holy Family Orphanage recently. The money was received by the Sister Superior who extends thanks to the Society for its generosity.

    The Temperance Society of St. John Cantius Parish, through its secretary, Peter Bocian, contributed ten dollars to the Holy Family Orphanage recently. The money was received by the Sister Superior ...

    Polish
    I B 1, II D 4, III C
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 19, 1895
    Educational Meeting Held at University Hall by Poles of Town of Lake

    A second educational and literary meeting was held by the Poles of Town of Lake on Sunday, February 17, at 6 P.M., at University Hall. The meeting was opened by Dr. T. Kodis.

    The first speaker of the evening was Mr. Chrzanowski, who spoke on the Polish insurrection of 1863. He pointed out its significance as an example of the awakening of the Polish spirit in the nation. His speech was enthusiastically received.

    This address was followed by a musical duet. Mr. Grysinski, playing the violin, and Mr. Wilkoszewski, at the piano, gave a lively rendition of Polish airs. Miss Zurawska contributed a beautiful recitation of "Placz Nad Rzekami Babylonu" (Tears on the Rivers of Babylon), by Ujejski. Her delivery was forceful and stirring.

    The fourth and final number on the program was a talk by Dr. Kodis dealing 2with the influence of alcohol on the human organism. He presented a clear and convincing word picture of the reasons for the agitation against the use of alcohol. Dr. Kodis was rewarded with warm applause for his lecture.

    Reverend Pyplatz and the committee deserve credit for arranging these instructive programs, in which variety is injected so that they will prove not only interesting but beneficial to the public.

    A second educational and literary meeting was held by the Poles of Town of Lake on Sunday, February 17, at 6 P.M., at University Hall. The meeting was opened by ...

    Polish
    II B 2 g, II B 1 a, I B 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- April 23, 1895
    Third in a Series of Patriotic Exercises Held at Bridgeport

    The third in a series of patriotic exercises was held Sunday, April 21, at Leon Czeslawski's hall under the sponsorship of the literary club "Zorza" (The Dawn).

    The program was as follows:

    I. Machnikowski gave a lecture on Adam Mickiewicz, Polish novelist. He also rendered a declamation.

    Dr. Statkiewicz gave a talk on the influence of alcohol on the human system.

    Miss Przybylska recited a beautiful Polish verse, "He who loves must suffer."

    A declamation, "Must", was given by Mr. Ciechowicz.

    Seven-year-old Eugene Janiszewski and little Mary Bauer recited several Polish 2verses.

    In conclusion, N. L. Piotrowski induced Reverend Krawczunas, who was in the audience, to say a few words. The priest praised the Poles for their wonderful patriotic functions and urged them to keep up their fine work.

    [Translator's note: These patriotic exercises were staged in connection with commemorating 1895 as a year of national mourning; for it marked the one-hundredth anniversary of the third partition of Poland.]

    The third in a series of patriotic exercises was held Sunday, April 21, at Leon Czeslawski's hall under the sponsorship of the literary club "Zorza" (The Dawn). The program was ...

    Polish
    III H, II B 1 d, I B 1, IV
  • Narod Polski -- January 22, 1897
    [Fined for Selling Beer Without License]

    Two Polish Grocers in South Bend, Indiana, selling bottled beer and allowing customers to consume it in their place of business without a license were fined $30.00 and costs.

    A Polish business man was supposed to have furnished information to local officials in this case.

    Two Polish Grocers in South Bend, Indiana, selling bottled beer and allowing customers to consume it in their place of business without a license were fined $30.00 and costs. A ...

    Polish
    I B 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 18, 1897
    Help for the Polish Hospital

    The Temperance Brotherhood of St. John Cantius Parish recently made a donation of seven dollars to the Polish Hospital.

    May God justly reward the members of this organization.

    Sisters of Nazareth.

    The Temperance Brotherhood of St. John Cantius Parish recently made a donation of seven dollars to the Polish Hospital. May God justly reward the members of this organization. Sisters of ...

    Polish
    II D 3, I B 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- February 18, 1897
    Help for Polish Orphans

    A donation of ten dollars was made by the Temperance Brotherhood of St. John Cantius Parish to the Holy Family Orphanage.

    May Jesus Christ reward the members of the Temperance Brotherhood a hundredfold.

    Sisters of Notre Dame.

    A donation of ten dollars was made by the Temperance Brotherhood of St. John Cantius Parish to the Holy Family Orphanage. May Jesus Christ reward the members of the Temperance ...

    Polish
    II D 4, I B 1
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- March 08, 1897
    Polish Orphanage Receives Help

    The Temperance Brotherhood, of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, donated $4.50 to the Holy Family Orphanage. Sincere thanks are extended to the donors.

    Sisters of Notre Dame.

    The Temperance Brotherhood, of St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish, donated $4.50 to the Holy Family Orphanage. Sincere thanks are extended to the donors. Sisters of Notre Dame.

    Polish
    II D 4, I B 1