The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 30, 1894
    November Manifestation in Holy Trinity Parish

    A patriotic manifestation commemorating the November insurrection of the Poles against Russia in 1830 was held last night at the Holy Trinity Parish Hall through the efforts of all parish societies. The affair was opened by S. Terczewski, who called upon S. F. Adalia Satalecki and J. J. Chrzanowski to act as chairman and recording secretary respectively.

    Reverend Casimir Sztuczko, pastor, who delivered the first address, urged work and sacrifice for Poland. A historical speech was given by I. Machnikowski. Other speakers were T. Rudzinski, Mrs. Kadis, and Anthony Stefanowicz, who spoke in Lithuanian.

    Declamations were made by Casimir Adamowski, Miss P. Sniegocka, and A. Lisztewnik. A piano solo was rendered by Mrs. Lande. Solos were sung by Miss A. Wojtalewicz and Mr. Gatkowski. Songs were also given by the Chopin 2and Wanda Choirs.

    At the close of the exercise a collection which netted $37.15 was taken for the Holy Trinity School. One fourth of this sum was turned over to the Rapperschwil Fund.

    Upon a motion made by John F. Smulski, it was agreed to send a letter of thanks to Dr. Lewakowski for his stand at the Austrian parliament in Vienna in behalf of the Poles. In this respect a committee composed of Reverend C. Sztuczko, J.F. Smulski, and E. Z. Brodowski was chosen to take care of the matter.

    A patriotic manifestation commemorating the November insurrection of the Poles against Russia in 1830 was held last night at the Holy Trinity Parish Hall through the efforts of all parish ...

    Polish
    III B 2, I A 2 c, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 11, 1895
    Benefit Ball to Be Given at Pulaski Hall

    Through the combined efforts of all the societies of St. Adalbert Parish, a benefit ball will be given tomorrow, starting at 4 P. M., at Pulaski Hall.

    According to an understanding reached by the delegates of the societies, one-third of the proceeds are to go toward Pulaski Hall and the other two-thirds toward the church and school of St. Adalbert Parish. This hall will also serve as an example of the unity, harmony and co-operation of the Polish societies of the parish.

    A program will take place before the dancing begins. A speech of welcome will be given by W. J. Pijanowski. Reverend John Radziejewski, pastor of St. Adalbert Parish, and Casimir Zychlinski will also speak.

    Invitations were sent to all societies, including those of the Polish National 2Alliance and the Polish Roman Catholic Union. A capacity crowd is expected.

    Through the combined efforts of all the societies of St. Adalbert Parish, a benefit ball will be given tomorrow, starting at 4 P. M., at Pulaski Hall. According to an ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c, III B 2, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- May 25, 1895
    Financial Report of Benefit Ball Staged by St. Adalbert Parish Societies

    On May 12 the societies of St. Adalbert Parish staged a benefit ball at Pulaski Hall; its results were satisfactory. The committee in charge, comprised of representatives of the various societies, wishes to extend an old-fashioned Polish "thank you" to the speakers, military societies and civil societies for their co-operation.

    The financial statement is as follows:

    Income

    Wardrobe $2.60
    Refreshments 8.65
    Tickets sold at Hall 48.75
    Bar [drinks] 219.30
    Tickets sold by societies 188.75
    Total $468.05
    2

    Expenses

    J. I. Migdalski (printing) $6.50
    B. Z. Maciejewski (ham, lemons, etc) 8.07
    Christ Bronder (cigars) 21.20
    R. Hensel (music) 64.00
    J. Bonk and Marcinkowski (hall and drinks) 99.05
    J. Michalowski (cigars) 6.40
    Total $205.22

    This resulted in a net profit of $262.83. This sum was divided as follows: One third, $87.61, for the benefit of the Pulaski Hall; and two thirds, $175.22, to J. Radziejewski, pastor of St. Adalbert Parish for the benefit of the church and school. The committee suggested the purchase of a canopy for the church.

    In the name of the committee thanks are extended to all the supporters of this cause.

    Stephen Napieralski

    On May 12 the societies of St. Adalbert Parish staged a benefit ball at Pulaski Hall; its results were satisfactory. The committee in charge, comprised of representatives of the various ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 c
  • Narod Polski -- July 11, 1906
    Poles in Chicago Convention of Polish Women's Alliance

    The Polish Women's Alliance finished its sixth convention last week.

    Several resolutions were adopted for support of the organization.

    Important items of the resolution were on the gradual assessment.

    They also elected a commission to deliberate on the problem, and set aside a sum for educational purposes.

    The Polish Women's Alliance finished its sixth convention last week. Several resolutions were adopted for support of the organization. Important items of the resolution were on the gradual assessment. They ...

    Polish
    III B 2, I K, III B 4, I A 2 c
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- January 25, 1907
    A Magnificent Concert

    This Sunday, January 27th, at 8 P. M. in the Schoenhofen Hall there will be held an unusual interesting concert consisting of song. It shall be performed by the Stanislaus Dramatic Male Choir Society under the direction of the talented Mr. F. Kondziorski, who for several months has been preparing the production of an elaborate program.

    For the first time in the history of Chicago there will be sung in Polish Mr. K. Gounod's prominent masterpiece, "Kowadlo"; also a new creation of Mr. Wiedeman's "Wisla." There will also be the singing of Mr. Demunski's creations, "Songs of our Nation." Mr. A. J. Kwasigroch, a popular male tenor, will also be present to portray his talent.

    Dancing will take place after the concert. The fund received from this concert will be donated toward a new school of St. Stanislaus.

    This Sunday, January 27th, at 8 P. M. in the Schoenhofen Hall there will be held an unusual interesting concert consisting of song. It shall be performed by the Stanislaus ...

    Polish
    I A 2 c, II B 1 a, IV
  • Dziennik Chicagoski -- November 28, 1908
    Proclamation of Our Bishop to Polish Organizations and All Polish Socieries in America

    Fellow countrymen:

    We were driven out mainly by heavy pressure and misery from the old country; we threw away our empty desperation. We did not work in the bottomless sea of foreign influence without our knowledge, but with faith in God tied to our tongues. Virtue and Polish habits are always drawing us closer to national unity.

    From the midst of our modest and poor living, we shot into heaven our verification of the old faith in God and his many saints. Near them the young hearts in our parochial schools are rejoicing at our good intentions.

    But nevertheless we all feel that we need a higher culture and higher 2branches of teaching so we can overcome our lack of culture and ease our suffering.

    In the city of Chicago where the population of Polish people surpasses the population in the city of Lwow in Poland or the city of Crskow, it is proof to us that we must have more and higher branches of teaching to save our language and the history of our native land, as well as our existence in America.

    The Polish colleges were founded in 1892 by the O. O. Resurrectionists and in several years expanded to the great number of the present day; praised are the patriots who helped bring recognition to our Polish schools and teachings.

    In the old building near Division Street there is no school lecture hall, not even a reliable hall for drilling our children; there are not sufficient rooms to accommodate our constantly increasing number of teachers.

    3

    Because of the fire regulations, the school and the teachers rooms cannot be overcrowded, which proves to us that we Poles should make it our duty to have a new modern up-to-date school built to accommodate all our Polish youngsters.

    But alas: another more important matter knocks at the hearts of our caretakers; above all, the heart of our well known leader, Most Rev. Father John Kosinski. Therefore we Poles with our nationality, three million strong in the United States, must, for the sake of our schooling, expend our Polish colleges in Chicago.

    This institution has received the approval from our central government to establish this college and to be recognized on a par with our American colleges. It should, in time, come to be the first Polish college in the United States.

    What praise it will be for our Polish people! What great advantage will it bring to our youngsters and the Polish families?

    4

    The higher Polish gymnasiums and Polish universities in Catholic Christianity support culture and science and in a short time will elevate the standing of the Polish nationality and open now fields for our talented Polish graduates.

    Fellow countrymen! This kind of work will place us high in the eyes of other nationalities and will shatter the arguments of our enemies who are trying to make an example of us and classify us as lower than any other nationality, but this is not so and we Poles should fight and demand our rights in this free country.

    Fellow citizens! Let us add our efforts and not hold back our donations so that the splendid plan of Rev. Father John Kosinski can come to reality in the shortest possible time.

    The foundation (for our Polish college in Chicago today represents a first-class high school) surpasses the European gymnasiums.

    5

    There are quite a number of educational collections gathered by the Order of Resurrectignist Fathers. There are educational faculties and above all youth is desirous to learn.

    Fellow countrymen, it is in your power, upon your willingness and sacrifices depends, the success of moving the Polish college to a new building, scientifically improved and developed, to be a fortress and guardian against outside influences, who are denationalizing our youth, depriving them of their basic belief in God and in the future of our dear Fatherland.

    Let us all lend a hand in the deed, which the Rev. Rector John Kosinski at present desire to bring into reality; lot us give our youth a higher education and ability to prepare a better future for the nation.

    Let it be that from faith and education will come a rebirth of our nation, and we will be able to celebrate in the near future our resurrection!

    6

    Having this conviction, the citizens committee organized for this aim under the leadership of the Very Rev. Bishop Paul Rhode, calls upon all fellow countrymen, without exception, to give even a small bit for this purpose, so noble and patriotic.

    May it be that in the publicly announced lists of donors there be found the humble offerings of the poorest. Let every Polish man and Polish woman lend a hand in this act.Let our old Fatherland and our foes see our unity and solidarity, let all of us receive more faith and belief in the future, when everybody, without exception, will put in their offerings for a place and the erection of institutional edifices which will be a testimonial of love for our country, language and Polish education to our future generations.

    Heartily and ardently we beseech you, fellow countrymen, with all your ability to support the Rev. Rector John Kosinski, whom we have invited as treasurer of the Committee.

    7

    All communications should be addressed to the Very Rev. Rector John Kosinski, C. R., St. Stanislaus College, 140 W. Division St., Chicago, Ill. Committee:

    Bishop Paul Rhode, Honorary President; John F. Smulski, Treasurer, State of Illinois, President; Rev. Father P. M. Wojtalewicz, President of the Administration of the P.R.C.U.; Rev. Father Jacek Gulski, Chaplain of the Polish Women's Society in America: Rev. Father D. M. Majer, Chaplain of the Polish Union in America; Rev. Father Stanley Nawrocki, President of the Polish Priests Society; Leon Szopinski, President of the Polish Roman-Catholic Union: W. J. Jozwiakowski, President of Polish Alma Mater Society; Dr. Frank E. Fronczak, from Buffalo, N. Y.; and A. Karabasz, from Pittsburg, Pa.

    Fellow countrymen: We were driven out mainly by heavy pressure and misery from the old country; we threw away our empty desperation. We did not work in the bottomless sea ...

    Polish
    I A 2 a, I A 2 c, III A, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- February 16, 1917
    A Short History of the Founding of St. Michael Archangel Parish in South Chicago by Reverend Adolph Nowicki [Second Installment]

    "Antek, Wojtek, what's the rush, where are you going?" asked the people on seeing their friends running as fast as they could go down Ontario Avenue, utterly heedless of obstacles, splashing through water up to their ankles, since, incidentally, Warsaw [Translator's note: the district was called little Warsaw by its inhabitants] abounds in this element, and at times Noah's ark would come in very handy.

    Antek turned around and, smiling, replied: "I'm running for tools; we're going to build a church!"

    "A church? What church? Where?"

    2

    "Don't you know that the archbishop has sent Reverend Nowicki as rector? There he is--over there with a hammer in his hand calling the people to work! 'Come on, people,' he says, 'we're going to build a church, and you, Antek,' he says to me 'run and get some tools.' So I'm hurrying as fast as I can!"

    "But Antek, you must be crazy! Where's the architect, who's the contractor? You can't build without a plan."

    Antek laughed. "What do we need an architect and a contractor for? We'll just build the church ourselves and have done with it. Better come and help, and bring your hammers." Having said this, he nodded his head and hurried on.

    This, my dear parishioners, happened on a certain Tuesday in the latter part of February, 1892. In reality the good people returning from work, on seeing that I was fiddling around out there, came over and asked: "What's this going to be, Father?"

    3

    "We're going to build a church."

    "That's fine, Father; we'll build a church. But when?"

    "Well, why not right away? Let's clear the space, because we already have the lumber."

    I had no sooner finished than these good people set to work, this one with a spade, others with axes, and pretty soon saws and hammers were in evidence. "Hey!" someone yelled, "set the posts for the foundation!" And in the twinkling of an eye the posts were set. "Here, fellows!" called Frank Mazurek to the young men, "bring over the floor joists." Antek started and many others followed, and when they all started sawing, chopping, squaring, and nailing, the floor, too, was quickly completed.

    On the following day Mr. Ratkowski, a contractor, appeared on the scene. He is a real businessman and, having gotten wind of the fact that something was going on in St. Michael's Parish, he thought it might be worth the trouble to go over 4and find out what was up. So he came, looked into all the corners, giving some advice here, correcting something there, and seeing that everything was going smoothly--twirled his moustache and thought: there will be some business around here, the rector is young and therefore energetic, the parishioners are willing workers! Whereas I, taking advantage of his presence, said, "Here, brother, give us a hand; we're building this church for the glory of God." And the good fellow helped us willingly, for which we are grateful to him.

    Thus the work progressed: my poor parishioners, after working all day in the steel mills, came willingly to finish the church.

    Working thus, my parishioners built the church in three days, and would not accept a penny for their labor. I mention this so that others may know what good people the parishioners of St. Michael's at Warsaw are. The church was built, and on Saturday of the same week we celebrated our first Mass in it.

    It is true that the church did not present an overly well-built appearance, and 5sometimes it seemed to me that the window on the south side somehow looked toward the north. The little church, however, had its good points: for instance, the school children could easily study geography on its roof--one could easily discern hills and valleys there, and after rain there were gulfs and straits and other things entering into the field of geography. But all jokes aside, the little church served us well for a long time, and we were happy there.

    When the little church was finished I began to think about building a school, because a school, my good parishioners, is a most important matter--it is the soul of the parish. Close our schools and our Polish people will be lost. The school is the sun whose beams warm us to Christian virtue and national solidarity.

    I thought and planned for a long time on how to turn my most sincere wish into reality, until finally I came to the conclusion that I must call the people together, or as one says here, call a parish mass meeting. So we got together and discussed the building of the school. The parishioners, however, were of the opinion that we would not need a large building for the school, since, as they 6said, there would be at most two hundred and fifty children. Somehow it did not seem possible to me that my parishioners would be so poorly endowed with this Polish virtue, but I thought that since the people had so decided I should not oppose them. Nevertheless, I decided to go from house to house personally to collect for the church, and in this manner ascertain the true state of affairs concerning the growing young Poles.

    I therefore began my peregrination among the houses of my parishioners: I come in, look around, and see everything very modest and clean, and the children nicely dressed. Having praised God, I ask: "Well, mother, how many of these youngsters do you have?"

    I have four, Father."

    I enter another house "How many children are there here?"

    Six, praise the Lord!" I say nothing, but go on. At the next place there are eight. It seems to be going up, I think to myself. I go on--but here I see 7only one little girl and one little boy. "What's this, mother," I say, "you have only two children?"

    "No, indeed, Father, there are five; the other three got scared and hid under the bed."

    When I finally looked over this army of Joes, Walters, Stanleys, Marys, Sophies, etc., I got scared and thought I would go absolutely bankrupt: "Please, Father, may I have a [holy] picture?" said one of the youngsters--"and me, too," says another, grabbing my cassock--"and me, too," cries a third, grabbing my button--"and me, too, and me, too," cry the others surrounding me on all sides. I reach into my pocket and begin to hunt, thinking that my final hour has struck. Finally, after having gotten out of this attack by the youngsters, I thought to myself; Ha, my worthy parishioners have certainly miscalculated. No, I thought, these fours, sixes, eights, and tens are no joking matter. One has to prepare for battle with them in advance. They must have a fine building, a large, roomy school, so that they may not be scattered by all four winds. They need a large playground, and we have only six lots, which is not sufficient for Polish 8youngsters.

    We therefore bought twelve lots and erected an imposing building, which contains roomy and comfortable classrooms downstairs and a large church upstairs; it will suffice for us for many long years. And we did well in erecting a large school, one for fifteen hundred youngsters rather than for two hundred and fifty, because already, five years after the founding of the parish, we have, praise the Lord, eight hundred children in the school. We also have a fine playground for the children and a drill ground for the parish societies. Just come and see when out youngsters pour out into the playground and begin racing, because Polish nature must have space and freedom; or come and see us when all our societies get dressed up in their uniforms and stand in line, and the marshal orders: "Shoulder arms, forward march!" It is a thrilling sight! They march, they play, and there is plenty of room!

    We had only one difficulty and that was with our dear neighbor Michigan (the lake on which Chicago is situated). It is a great friend of Neptune and sometimes played serious tricks on the parish property; all it has to do is blow once and 9you have a foot of water! Our mayor and city fathers, to whom I went for advice, maintained that really this has a rather favorable effect on the Poles, because they are hot tempered, they say, and the water supposedly has a cooling effect on them.

    (To be continued next Friday.)

    "Antek, Wojtek, what's the rush, where are you going?" asked the people on seeing their friends running as fast as they could go down Ontario Avenue, utterly heedless of obstacles, ...

    Polish
    III C, I A 2 a, I A 2 c, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- March 30, 1917
    Activities of the Students' Aid Society of Chicago

    The Students' Aid Society of Chicago held its annual meeting last Sunday, March 25, and elected the following officers: I. M. Helinski, president; W. Perlowski, vice-president; A. J. Danisch, recording secretary; Stanley Biegalski, financial secretary; Adam Majewski, treasurer; and Paul Marciniak, marshal. A special commission, consisting of Reverend Casimir Sztuczko, T. M. Helinski, Paul Nawrot, W. Janiszewski, B. Majchrowicz, Mrs. J. Litewski, and Mrs. J. Orlowski, was appointed.

    The Students' Aid Society has been in existence for five years. According to the secretary's report, the gross income of the Society during the five years of its existence amounts to $2,967.54. The total disbursements were $2,811.79, not including $800.25 in unpaid bills. Immediately after the reading of the report, a collection was taken which yielded $456.15. The amount of this collection, plus cash on hand of $155.75, will be used to pay $588 for tuition fees up to the end of 1916 and $8.25 for stationery and postage. Therefore, 2the cash left on hand actually amounts to $15.65, and the unpaid tuition fees for the first three school months of 1917 amount to $204. The following contributions were made at last Sunday's meeting:

    The St. Vincent de Paul Society, $200; the Literary Society, proceeds of its benefit social, $100; the Casimir Pulaski Citizens' Club, $25.15, collected during the installation of its officers; Holy Trinity High School Alumni, $15, from a dance; T. M. Helinski, $5; W. Perlowski, $5; A. J. Danisch, $5; Mrs. W. Slominski, $5; Reverend C. Sztuczko, $5; Reverend B. Iwaszewski, $2; Reverend S. Gruza, $2; Reverend S. Hosinski, $2; Reverend A. Rozewicz, $2; the W. Swiatkiewicz Society, Group 189 of the Alliance of Polish Falcons, $2.50; Order III of the Franciscan Fathers, $2; T. Lissy, $1; A. Kulesza, $1; Society of Young Industrialists, $1; Adam Majewski, $2; Sons of Poland Society, $2; Stephanie Ceremuga, $1; Mary Rozczynalski, $1; the women's society Apostles of Prayer, $5; Women's Sodality, $3; Literary Circle, $5; Federation of Societies, $10; J. Stelnicki, $1; J. Wiermanski, $2; White Eagle Society, $2; F. Kryc, $1; Boleslaw the Great Society, $5; the Teen Age Society, $5; Mrs. J. Orlowski, $1; St. Ann's 3Society, $54; J. Struzyk, $1; F. Borta, $1; F. Borta, $1; Brotherhood of the Sacred Heart of Mary, $3; St. Elizabeth Society, $5, Stanley and Josephine Lisewski, $2; Paul Nawrot, $2; Eagle and Chase Society, $2; H. Mankowski, $2; a. Witanski, $1; St. Lawrence Society, $2.50; Adam Politowicz, $1; Joseph Wolowski, $1; and St. John the Baptist Society, $1.

    Fifty-one societies and 122 individuals belong to the Students' Aid Society. Those who could not attend Sunday's meeting are asked to bring their contributions to the rectory or to the undersigned. New members are invited to join.

    Respectfully,

    STUDENTS' AID SOCIETY:

    T. M. Helinski, president,

    1201 Milwaukee Avenue

    Adalbert J. Danisch, recording secretary,

    1025 Milwaukee Avenue

    The Students' Aid Society of Chicago held its annual meeting last Sunday, March 25, and elected the following officers: I. M. Helinski, president; W. Perlowski, vice-president; A. J. Danisch, recording ...

    Polish
    I A 2 c, II B 1 d, III B 2, III C, IV
  • Dziennik Związkowy -- March 31, 1917
    Tag Day for Working Girls' Home

    In connection with tomorrow's celebration of Palm Sunday, our women are arranging an annual Violet Day, that is, a tag day for the benefit of the school, the nursery, and the home for working girls conducted by the Sisters of Resurrection. This tag day will be sponsored by the Society for the Care of the School and Nursery, and it has the sanction of the municipal authorities, as well as the approval of our parish rectors, who consider this society's work worthy of the support of all people of good will. It is a well-known fact the Sisters have to help support these institutions, especially the nursery and the home for working girls, both of which are located at 1849 Hermitage Avenue. Our women are appealing to all of us to make contributions, no matter how small, once a year around the Easter holidays, for a cause so dear to our hearts.

    The taggers will be Polish young women, daughters of our citizenry. They will give the passers-by violets, harbingers of spring, in exchange for their 2contributions. May their contributions be as large as they can afford.

    The young women entrusted with the task of collecting are Victoria Biedka, Helen Augustynowicz, and Elizabeth Zamorski (St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish); W. Perlinski, Mary Rutkowski, and Constance Chrustowski (St. Mary of Angels Parish); Mary Kuflewski, Anna Pask, and Helen Herman (St. Casimir Parish); Josephine Dolazinski, Anastasia Wiedemann, and Helen Larkowski (St. Hedwig Parish); Elizabeth Szczepanski, Louise Szwajkart, and Mary Kosobucki (Avondale); Czaja and Rosalie Kozlowski (Logan Square); Frances Glomski (St. John Berchman Parish, Belgian); and Frances Pawelczyk and Ann Choinski (St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr Parish, Cragin, Illinois).

    In connection with tomorrow's celebration of Palm Sunday, our women are arranging an annual Violet Day, that is, a tag day for the benefit of the school, the nursery, and ...

    Polish
    III B 3 b, I A 2 c, II D 4, II D 6, III C, I K
  • Chicago Society News -- [Unknown date]
    Holy Trinity High School [$200,000 School to Be Erected]

    The drive for the $200,000 school building, the only Polish High School in Chicago is still on. Those desiring to contribute should do so at once. It is not how much you give, but the fact that by giving, you approve of the idea of higher education for the coming generation of young men of Polish extraction.

    The various teams are out working in their respective fields and interviewing prospects for donations. If you are approached by any of the workers, do not turn them down, but listen to what they have to say and then contribute your mite. Every little helps. The cause is a worthy one and we heartily recommend it to you. When sending your contribution, mention the News. This is your last chance to help this worthy cause.

    The drive for the $200,000 school building, the only Polish High School in Chicago is still on. Those desiring to contribute should do so at once. It is not how ...

    Polish
    I A 2 c