The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Zgoda -- February 13, 1889
    Polish Emigration in America

    Two great dangers today threaten our Polish emigration here in America. Americanism and, internally, our two parties standing divided as foes.

    Americanism with all of its material strength and its enormous power of superiority, stands as an enemy, an eternal foe opposing everything that is exclusively ours which constitutes our national distruction and which joins us still with our fatherland.

    Americanism wants to take away our Polish tongue, our modes, customs, morals, religion and our God.

    Two great dangers today threaten our Polish emigration here in America. Americanism and, internally, our two parties standing divided as foes. Americanism with all of its material strength and its ...

    Polish
    III A, I C
  • Zgoda -- March 13, 1889
    Polish Falcons

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically.

    It is well known, dear fellow men, that the above mentioned society has now and will have the following aims:

    First, to lend a helping hand whenever needed and to live in peace amongst ourselves like brothers. To join with other organizations, like the Polish National Alliance, and by it help to build a Polish hall here in Chicago.

    Second, to produce Polish theatricals, recitals, concerts, etc., as by this alone we shall obstruct the path to evil into which our youth might fall. So for this reason I make a plea to our friends, especially to the Polish youth, to join our Polish-American Falcons' organization, and by working together we will show other nationalities that our Polish mother doesn't 2need to be ashamed of her children.

    So come young and old to our meetings that take place every first Sunday of the month at 2 o'clock in the afternoon in the hall of Mr. Nalepinski, at Noble and Chopin street.

    As to the question of building a Polish hall, it could be accomplished in a short while.

    The gymnastic education society entitled "Polish-American Falcons" was organized with the intention of affording to the Polish youth an opportunity to educate themselves mentally and develop physically. It is well ...

    Polish
    III E, II B 3, III B 2, II E 3, II B 1 c 3, II B 1 a
  • Zgoda -- June 19, 1889
    A New Polish Lawyer

    We are informed that our young Polish comrade, Maksymilian Drzymata, has passed his examinations at the University, qualifying him for a lawyer's degree.

    He is the same person who, at the last celebration of the anniversary of May the 3rd, orated in English about the Polish foreign relations during the dismemberment of Poland.

    We are informed that our young Polish comrade, Maksymilian Drzymata, has passed his examinations at the University, qualifying him for a lawyer's degree. He is the same person who, at ...

    Polish
    II A 1, IV
  • Zgoda -- June 30, 1889
    To the Polish Singers of America

    Poles scattered in this American land, are devoting their time and talent to various pursuits. Other nationalities, seeing us busy like ants, admit that we are also people, and have strength, a soul, and possess a great ability, sometimes even greater than theirs. We can convince ourselves with facts that we hold great interest in all branches of industry and in numerous events. In order to continue to aid ourselves morally and materially, the Poles have built and continue building churches, schools, establishing various public and church organizations, also the necessary activities in singing.

    What is dearer to a person if not a song? How wonderful it is sometimes to watch in the early morning the lark ascending to the heavens and its Creator, singing a hymn of adoration and praise. In watching a thing of this sort, does it not urge every person to confine his thoughts and heart to God? If not, well, an evil one knows nothing of a song. Our Polish anthems, like every other branch of arts, had difficulties in staying on their feet, or one might say "tracks." We saw how the organizations of singers rose and fell, frequently from the lack of support, or from lack of funds and Polish tunes.

    2

    Everything was quiet, as if everybody was sleeping. It looked as if the Poles did not know how to sing.

    It was quiet and sad -- until a few years ago a couple of these organizations, which were subject to the feeling of failure, re-organized themselves on a new and stronger foundation and created "The Organization of Polish Singers in America." This was started and did not lack strength because there is plenty of it, especially upon this large American land, if only every one wanted to sincerely help and lend a helping hand and work for the benefit of this organization. Our aim is:

    To rise, and wake the nation's soul by our Polish song, to acquaint the nation with the creations of our artists, as on an occasion held before on the first concert that had taken place in Chicago in the month of May 1889. Another aim is to be supporters for these new creations pertaining to music, by donations and increasing our fund for this aim.

    So for this reason, then, our organization of Polish singers in America requests all other existing organizations to join us and work together, bringing praise to the Polish names. As for others, who do not yet belong to any such kind of an organization, and feel capable of singing, should join an existing singers organization, and help aid together this one large Polish Singers' Organization in America.

    3

    At the first concert sponsored by Organized Polish Singers of America, held in Chicago, there were represented three choirs: The Chopin Singers' Organization as the first; the Harmonia Organized Singers as second; and the Z. S. P. Choir from Milwaukee as third.

    Which organization shall be the fourth choir? We hope that in the future gathering of singers in Milwaukee, there will be at least ten choirs represented.

    Poles scattered in this American land, are devoting their time and talent to various pursuits. Other nationalities, seeing us busy like ants, admit that we are also people, and have ...

    Polish
    II B 1 a, III B 2
  • Zgoda -- July 10, 1889
    News in America Forty-Two States

    July 14, 1889, there were four new stars added to our American flag, because on this day four new states were composed and admitted to the American Union. We have today forty-two stars hovering in the sky of our Republic, the United States of America.

    This same day in the year of 1790 there were only thirteen stars shining on their area of 325,065 square miles; today the expansion of this same Republic covers the area of 2,405,070 square miles.

    From the time of the daring and heroic associates of Washington, consisting of bold and brave generals, among whom we find Kosciuszko and Pulaski, who fought gallantly for the freedom of our Republic, our country grew consistently in area and that is why today it is so large it could easily, without any damage or injury to itself, take in the population of Europe.

    2

    In the years of 1791, 1792, 1796, three new stars were added to the original: Vermont, Kentucky and Tennessee. In the year 1802, Ohio; 1812, Louisiana; 1816, Indiana; 1817, Mississippi; 1818, Illinois; 1819, Alabama; 1820, Maine; 1821, Missouri; 1836, Arkansas; 1837, Michigan; 1845, Florida and Iowa; 1846, Texas; 1847, Wisconsin; 1850, California; 1858, Minnesota; 1859, Oregon; 1861, Kansas; 1862, West Virginia; 1864, Nevada; 1867, Nebraska; 1875, Colorado. Washington, Montana and both of the Dakotas were just admitted into the Union, July 4, 1889.

    The area of the United States is large, and frequently there is a creation of a new settlement. The people always migrate forward. This, then, creates material for future stars in the form of budding states.

    July 14, 1889, there were four new stars added to our American flag, because on this day four new states were composed and admitted to the American Union. We have ...

    Polish
    I J
  • Zgoda -- July 31, 1889
    From the Central Government

    The secretary of the Polish Union Organization informs us that among our fellow men who work in the mines there is a strike bringing poverty to them and their families.

    So, for this reason the central government of the Polish Union Organization appeals to our fellow men's hearts in the United States, begging them to make a donation, if able to do it.

    The ill fate that befell them today might happen to us tomorrow, so let us help now, and in the future let us pray that our plea for help shall not be rejected.

    The secretary of the Polish Union Organization informs us that among our fellow men who work in the mines there is a strike bringing poverty to them and their families. ...

    Polish
    I D 2 a 4
  • Zgoda -- August 14, 1889
    Local News

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an active movement in order to try to secure the holding of this fair in our city. The mayor of our city then selected a committee consisting of the most prominent citizens of the state for this aim, so that they could take care of this matter.

    From among the Poles only two citizens belong to this committee and they are Mr. Peter Kiolbasa and Mr. Zbigniew Brodowski.

    There shall take place in America, in the year 1892, a world exposition for the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus. In Chicago there was an ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, I F 5, I F 4, IV
  • Zgoda -- August 28, 1889
    American News - World Exposition

    There is no doubt whatsoever that this exposition is to be held here in Chicago in the year 1892, in honor of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Christopher Columbus.

    As soon as there occurred an idea of holding a fair for this occasion, there began a scramble among various cities to receive this honor. Especially cities such as Washington, New York and Chicago, but our city showed its quickness and readiness to meet this event with the aid of the representatives of Congress, who will unanimously vote for Chicago. A large committee has already been selected and is composed of the most prominent known people in the state, who immediately went to work energetically on this affair. From among the Poles selected for this committee were citizen Peter Kiolbasa and Zbikniew Brodowski, an editor. Mr. Brodowski first heard about his nomination for the committee from the papers. Probably if he had known of this before he was selected, he would 2perhaps have refused this honor and placed his position upon someone else, because it requires money to work on this committee, as his salary is small working as an editor for a Polish newspaper. But he eventually accepted this position and will do the best he can, because he does not care to prejudice the Polish name in any way.

    There is no doubt whatsoever that this exposition is to be held here in Chicago in the year 1892, in honor of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 3, IV
  • Zgoda -- November 20, 1889
    Polish Hall Named "Pulaski."

    Poles in Chicago, in the south central part of the city, always had the idea and ambition to construct a Polish hall in their section of the town. A few weeks ago they purchased four lots, on which there shall stand the Polish hall. Friday, the 15th of November, there was an unusual meeting, at which they chose nine directors. They are Mr. Napieralski, Smietanka, Blaszezynski, Drzymaly, Rosanski, Grzegorzewski, Fruzyn, Marcinkowski, and Maciejewski.

    They formed an organization under the name of Pulaski Hall Builders Organization. To this organization in that part of town various groups, organizations, likewise church, gymnastic organizations and the Polish Falcons No. 1, joined in. Good luck.

    Poles in Chicago, in the south central part of the city, always had the idea and ambition to construct a Polish hall in their section of the town. A few ...

    Polish
    II D 6, IV
  • Zgoda -- December 18, 1889
    Local News

    This year's carnival of events among our Polonia is expected to be popular. Many organizations are arranging banquets and thetrical programs. The dramatic circle from the South Side will present a play on New Year's Day, "Women and Hussars," after which amateurs will dance a "Mazurka" in four parts.

    The Central Polish Women's Alliance in America will present a stage play, entitled "The Two Orphans," the first Sunday in January, on the South Side. The play has been translated into Polish by the author of "Three Floras," Miss T. Somolinska.

    We also hear that our carnival singers will be in the concert program. The variety of entertainment will be extraordinary.

    This year's carnival of events among our Polonia is expected to be popular. Many organizations are arranging banquets and thetrical programs. The dramatic circle from the South Side will present ...

    Polish
    II B 1 c 1, II B 1 c 2