The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Skandinaven -- June 03, 1892
    [Communication]

    The Editor, Skandinaven:

    "Having time and time again noticed and read with pleasure your many plain expositions and well-directed efforts to convince disbelievers and misguided persons as to the real political relations between Norway and Sweden, the writer, who is a constant reader of the daily issue of your paper, respectfully asks space for a few remarks on that vexed question.

    "The more immediate occasion for coming back to this matter is an announcement in the Milwaukee Evening Wisconsin for May 27, in which it says editorially, 'It was inspiring to see the "Swedish" flag floating from the peak of a vessel in the port of Milwaukee,' referring to the steamer 'Wergeland' which honored that city by laying to for a while outside the harbor on her late passage to Chicago. This comment seems very improbable 2in the face of the fact that the 'Wergeland' hails from Bergen and is a Norwegian craft. There is no record that a Swedish vessel has ever been seen on these great inland seas.

    "But this is not the first time that that great and good paper, the Evening Wisconsin, has betrayed gross ignorance in matters of this sort, and made a laughing stock of itself. In its issue of November 28, 1891, space is given to a long communication which gives an account of the ancient Viking ship found at Gokstad 'on the Christiania Fjord'. This article was headed in large type: 'Out of a Swedish Mound'. This was refreshing indeed! When shortly afterwards the proper editors attention was called to this perversion of facts, he refused to make a correction in the columns of the paper, yet stated in writing, 'we do not hold ourselves blameless in the matter'.

    "It is no wonder at all that the small fry often fall into the pit when 3great leaders set the example.

    "While our Swedish brethren have for generations back distinguished themselves in scientific and industrial pursuits, our countrymen, from the time of the Vikings, have been known as seafarers and navigators of the first order, and have sailed every sea, in advance of many other voyagers. When the little brig, "Sleipner", came to Chicago as early as 1862, the Inter Ocean of that day gave a full account of that notable event, describing the craft as 'a perfect gem of shipbuilding'. The Northmen yield to no other nationality in good seamanship, and their country stands third in rank as to amount of tonnage afloat."

    The ship "Wergeland" docked in Chicago last week, the second Norwegian ship ever to reach Chicago. The "Wergeland", sails under Norwegian registry, and is manned by a Norwegian crew, Capt. Wiese and first officer Amland.

    The Editor, Skandinaven: "Having time and time again noticed and read with pleasure your many plain expositions and well-directed efforts to convince disbelievers and misguided persons as to the real ...

    Norwegian
    III H, II B 2 d 1, I C, V B, I C
  • Skandinaven -- November 25, 1892
    Professor Boyesen on the Scandinavians (Editorial)

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor Boyesen is supposed to be thoroughly at home in this field, and it is needless to say that the picture he has drawn is in the main true to life. Yet we venture to assert that it fails to do justice either to the painter or the "paintee."

    That Mr. Boyesen should repeat and emphasize the stale slander about Scandinavians at home was a surprise as painful as it was unexpected. There is no excuse whatever for such a glaring misstatement of fact. Whatever may have been true, or not true, in the past of the Scandinavians in this respect, it certainly cannot be maintained that the Scandinavians of today are more addicted to drunkenness than are other peoples, or races, subject to similar conditions of life.

    2

    During the past generation the temperance reformer has found no more promising field than on the Scandinavian peninsula. Nowhere has he attained greater or more substantial results. Excepting the peninsulas of southern Europe there is no country in Europe where the consumption of intoxicating liquors per capita is less than in Norway. Sweden also made rapid and substantial progress in her war on the dram shop. The Danes, like their southern neighbors, are still a people of rather steady drinkers; yet it is a fact that there is comparatively little drunkenness in Denmark.

    The same is true of Scandinavians in this country. In the West and Northwest the most determined and aggressive regiments in the army of temperance warriors have been recruited from among the Scandinavian farmer population of that section. The present High License Law of Minnesota is their work, and they are the leaders in the recent movement for more rigid restrictions. It was the Norwegians who forced prohibition upon North Dakota. In South Dakota, in Iowa, in Nebraska, in Kansas, the Norwegians and Swedes--excepting those dealing in intoxicants--stand firm and united in support of restrictive legislation.

    3

    It is not necessary for the purpose in hand to search for the source of the current belief that the Scandinavians are a race of drunkards. Most of those who hold it are not to blame. They have been misinformed, and do not know any better. But certainly, it could not be otherwise than painfully surprising to find the falsehood repeated in a publication of the high standing of The North American Review over the signature of Professor Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen. Most of the readers of this excellent magazine naturally take it for granted that writers admitted to its pages know what they are talking about. Their statements are generally believed whether true or false. It is sincerely to be regretted that Mr. Boyesen should fail to make better use of his splendid opportunity to cut the roots from a current falsehood.

    Mr. Boyesen's picture of the Scandinavians in the West is rather unattractive. If it is true, he cannot be blamed for that. But we think the general verdict will be that it is incomplete and misleading. He exaggerates the mutual jealousy alleged to exist between the three Scandinavian Nationalities. In proof of this assertion it is sufficient to point to the outcome of the recent election in Minnesota. He is unjust to the Norwegian Lutheran clergy. There 4may be, and probably are, mossbacks among them as well as in all other walks of life; but it is true that as a class, the ministers of the Norwegian Lutheran Church are opposed to general and national education. Among the students in the colleges and universities of the West, the Scandinavian youth are well represented. Most of these Scandinavian boys and girls are farmers' sons and daughters, who, with their parents' consent, have gone "in search of strange gods," as it is their aim to prepare themselves for a successful business or professional career.

    No hostility to the public schools is found among Scandinavian Lutheran Churches, nor can it be said that they are endeavoring to establish a system of parochial schools, strictly speaking. On the contrary, it is well understood throughout the Northwest that Scandinavian protestantism is a strong and unyielding bulwark of the unsectarian common school system.

    Exception might be taken also to other statements made in Professor Boyesen's paper. But this will do for the present. It might be added that a portion of 5his article containing all the doubtful elements in his picture of "The Scandinavians in the United States" has caught the eye of the exchange editor; and he has already started upon a more or less extensive journey into the columns of the daily and weekly press. Thus disconnected and isolated, this part of the article is a libel upon the Scandinavians as well as upon the author. Professor Boyesen undoubtedly regrets this use of his article as much as we do.

    We have critized frankly Professor Boyesen's statements. But we have no desire to be unjust to him or anybody else. If we have misrepresented his position or views in any way, he is welcome to the use of our columns. We shall also be glad to stand corrected if it be shown that we are mistaken in our views, or have made incorrect statements of facts.

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 2, I B 3 b, I A 1 a, I B 1, III C, I B 4, V B
  • Skandinaven -- July 02, 1893
    Viking

    Mr. C. Brewick is very much opposed to having the "VIKING" sold to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. He favors the raising of a fund to keep it in Chicago.

    Mr. C. Brewick is very much opposed to having the "VIKING" sold to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. He favors the raising of a fund to keep it in Chicago.

    Norwegian
    V B
  • Skandinaven -- May 10, 1896
    "The Scandinavian Contingent" (Editorial)

    "The Scandinavian Contingent," a paper by K.C. Babcock in the current issue of the Atlantic Monthly, is a very valuable contribution to contemporary history.

    The author has devoted many years and a vast amount of patient labor to the study of the Scandinavians in America, as well as in their old homes. His opportunities for observation and study in this particular field have been exceptional. He has lived for some nine years in Minneapolis, a city with a large Scandinavian population representing all three branches of the Norse family and making itself felt in all walks of life. As a student and as a teacher of history in the University of Minnesota, he has maintained close relations with a large number of Scandinavian young men and women of the best type. As a citizen of Minnesota he has been in a position to observe 2the Scandinavians in politics; one fourth of the population of Minnesota are of Scandinavian birth or blood, while one fourth of the Scandinavians in the United States are residents of Minnesota. The University of Minnesota at Minneapolis affords the best view to be obtained of the Scandinavians in the United States. Moreover, Mr. Babcock is familiar with the languages and literature of Norway, Sweden and Denmark. He has personally visited a large number of Scandinavian settlements in the northwest, and has extended his investigations and observations to the Scandinavian countries. He is singularly well qualified to discuss "The Scandinavian Contingent" intelligently and instructively, and in his paper in the Atlantic Monthly he has done justice to his subject and to himself alike.

    Mr. Babcock's narrative [style] is easy and steady. He writes as one who knows, and at once gains the confidence of his reader. His picture of the Norseman in America is fair, truthful, and sympathetic. As a citizen, the 3Norseman ranks very high in Mr. Babcock's opinion; yet he is not blind to his racial defects. His characterization of the three Scandinavian types is apt to be impartial. The article concludes as follows:

    "As Swedes, Norwegians and Danes, they fast disappear; merging, not into Scandinavians, but into Americans. They earn their right as such, and are proud of their possession. They readily fit into places among our better classes, and without hammering or chiseling, add strength and stability to our social structure, if not beauty and a high level of culture. Because of their habits of thought, their respect for education, and their conservatism, the difficulties of adjustment to their presence are at a minimum. The Scandinavians will not furnish the great leaders, but they will be in the front rank of those who follow, striving to make the United States strong and prosperous--'a blessing to the common man'. As Americans, they will be builders, not destroyers; safe, not brilliant. Best of all, their greatest service will be as a mighty steadying influence, reinforcing those high qualities which we sometimes call Puritan, sometimes American."

    4

    As has been stated, Mr. Babcock's paper is a very careful piece of literary workmanship. It is singularly free from mistakes; and such inaccuracies as may be found are merely suggestions or incidental remarks. The Norwegians' "distrust of the Irish," to which he refers, is largely confined to a few cities, for example, Chicago where competition for work is apt to run along national lines. In the country districts Norsemen and Irishmen get along peacefully, as neighbors should. The author's reference to statistics on intemperance in the Scandinavian countries would indicate that he is not fully familiar with the great improvement which has taken place in recent years. The consumption of "strong drink" has decreased materially in Sweden and Denmark, while Norway for a number of years has exhibited a smaller consumption of intoxicating beverages per capita than any other country in Europe, excepting the southern peninsulas of that continent. Here in Chicago the Scandinavians are not heavy drinkers, in fact, little drunkenness is noticed.

    5

    In the opinion of the author, "the Scandinavians will not furnish great leaders," of this great people. He may be right, and probably is; their comparative numerical weakness in the country at large, places them at a disadvantage in this respect. But they have produced great leaders in the past and even in our own days. The late John Sverdrup of Norway was a leader of rare genius and power; in England he would have been a Gladstone, in America a James G. Blaine. And in the Northwest the Scandinavians have already furnished leaders of considerable power and influence. Mr. Babcock will, it is believed, admit that the sturdiest and strongest political leader in Minnesota today is a Norwegian.

    Here in Chicago, and in Illinois, we have leaders who are not only popular, but of real importance.

    It may be assumed that Mr. Babcock is preparing a more exhaustive presentation of the subject so admirably outlined in "The Scandinavian Contingent".

    6

    He does speak of the professional men and women of note who live in Chicago and the middle west.

    "The Scandinavian Contingent," a paper by K.C. Babcock in the current issue of the Atlantic Monthly, is a very valuable contribution to contemporary history. The author has devoted many years ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I F 5, III A, III G, I B 1, V B
  • Skandinaven -- March 01, 1897
    Luther College (Editorial)

    The Luther College Club of Chicago held a festival in the Auditorium, in honor of the men and women graduates of the College.

    O. W. Torrison, the chairman of the evening, opened the festival with a few words, welcoming those present. The first speaker was professor Larsen, who spoke about the success of the College. He mentioned that twenty-three were graduating and two hundred and sixty were left; these were expected to graduate in the fall. The college has produced one hundred and thirty ministers, fifty-five teachers and a great number of lawyers, doctors, editors, etc. Reverend A. Bredesen spoke as follows:

    "I have not had the honor of writing the history of the Norwegian pioneers; but I may say that I have lived that history. My earliest recollections 2cluster around men and things in a struggling frontier settlement in central Wisconsin, more than forty years ago. I have known the Norwegian pioneer long and well, and in my appreciation of him and regard for him, I yield to no one.

    "It is meet and proper that the Norwegian pioneer should have recognition at a festive gathering of the loyal sons of Luther College. Our Alma Mater and her alumni owe him a great debt of honor and gratitude. Who was it that thirty-five years ago, in a frontier hamlet, called our Alma Mater into existence? Not, I trow, some multimillionaire in the East, some merchant prince, coal baron or oil king, but the horny-handed Norwegian pioneer on the prairies and backwoods of Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota. Who, but the Norwegian pioneer, has been the best friend and patron that our Alma Mater ever had? His good will was for many years her only endearment. Very little of material or moral support did the struggling college receive from any other source. The Norwegian pioneer of the past and the present has contributed cheerfully and liberally from his hard earnings to establish, equip, and support our Alma Mater.

    3

    He has sent hundreds of thousands of his brightest boys to fill her classes. Luther College is the college of the Norwegian pioneer, and stands today, and will ever stand, a noble monument of his sincere devotion and heroic endeavor in the cause of "Scientia vera et fides pura" [True knowledge and pure faith].

    "The Norwegian pioneer deserves honorable recognition also at the hand of the whole American people, for the splendid service which he has done in the advancement of civilization throughout the West and Northwest. If there is anything to which Americans of Norwegian birth may well point with pride, it is the Norwegian pioneer and his achievements. I do not know that the Norwegian-American has been a conspicuous and dismal failure in any respect--unless it be as a Democratic campaign shouter. His record as a thrifty, law-abiding, intelligent, and patriotic American citizen is very good. His percentage of pauperism, crime and illiteracy is as low as the lowest. In the trades, in the learned professions, in business, and in politics he his been reasonably successful. He has dotted the whole Northwest with his churches, schools, and charitable institutions.

    4

    He is an excellent farmer. He is the American sailor of today, and, whenever Uncle Sam wants to beat the Britishers in a sailing match, he calls his Norwegian sailor boys to do it for him. If, perhaps, in some respects the Norwegian American has done only passably well--as a pioneer, he has certainly been, as was to be expected, a splendid success. The typical Norwegian is a born pioneer. With his passion for ownership of land and a home, and his decided liking for adventure, combined with physical stamina, courage, and endurance, he is the stuff that pioneers are made of. And of this he has given abundant proof.

    Sixty years ago (1837), when immigration from Norway began, Chicago and Milwaukee were rough frontier towns, and the great Northwest was an almost unbroken wilderness, the haunt of wild beasts and wilder men. Many of the Norwegian pioneers settled here, by the great lake; lived here; struggled here; died here. And still, today, some of them are here to tell us the story of Chicago's growth from a small frontier town to a metropolis. As by a miracle, in the brief space of sixty years, this vast wilderness has been transformed into a splendid galaxy of wealthy, enlightened and 5progressive states. In the face of bloodthirsty savages and prowling beasts, blizzards and drought; dangers, difficulties, and hardships of every description, a grand army of brave, sturdy pioneers, men and women, has advanced civilization from the shores of the Great Lakes to Puget Sound.

    "To that noble army the Norwegian American has furnished far more than his quota of men and women; and they have not been camp followers, but have marched in the forefront, and borne more than their just share of toil, hardships, and dangers. On our Western and Northern frontiers, after the fur trader, with his 'Indian goods,' or the prospector, the timber thief and the cowboy--they were the first settlers to come. They were the harbingers of civilization, usually some were brawny descendants of the Vikings with their worthy helpmate and a half-dozen tow-headed children. The history of every state from Wisconsin to Washington, will, I believe, bear me out in this. The last national census shows that the Norwegians have been least given to huddling together in villages and in the great centers of population.

    6

    Though newcomers as compared with other nationalities, as owners of farms and homes, they already outrank all other elements of the population, the native American included. It is safe to say that this country never saw, and never will see more hardy, pushing, plucky and successful pioneers than the sons and daughters of old Norway.

    "Such is the stock that helped build our Luther College. Without them we would not have been able to build. We, here in Chicago, have done a small share in keeping the college going, but the main credit goes to the sons and daughters who have graduated from Luther and gone out into the world to sow the culture of Norway among the people. Our ministers are many, and they have done much to lighten the hearts of the people, living in the small towns, on the prairies, and in the forests. All hail these pioneers of our Lutheran faith. May our college keep up the good work of educating our people, and may it send them out to help those who need us. Long live Luther College."

    The Luther College Club of Chicago held a festival in the Auditorium, in honor of the men and women graduates of the College. O. W. Torrison, the chairman of the ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 1 c 3, I A 2 a, I D 1 a, I F 4, III G, I J, V B, IV
  • Skandinaven -- April 20, 1904
    [Lots of Coffee--Little Tea] (Summary)

    Skandinaven informs its reader that the Norwegians are the greatest coffee drinkers in the United States, but that they drink very little tea.

    Skandinaven informs its reader that the Norwegians are the greatest coffee drinkers in the United States, but that they drink very little tea.

    Norwegian
    V B
  • Skandinaven -- June 02, 1907
    Chicago Aldermen Will Play Baseball in the Interest of the Norwegian Crphanage on Irving Park Blvd

    On Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the Republican aldermen of Chicago will play a baseball game against the Democratic aldermen of the city, the proceeds to go to the Norwegian Children's Home at Irving Park Blvd. The game will take place at the White Sox ball park, 39th St. and Wentworth Ave.

    The umpire will be Mayor F.A.Busse.

    The line-up will be:

    Republicans Democrats.
    Pitcher: Bernhard W. Snow Pitcher: James B. Bowler
    Catcher: Lewis W. Sitts Catcher: Daniel Herlich
    1. Base: Joseph Badenoch 1.Base: Joseph Kohout
    2. Base: Henry J.Siewert 2. Base: Rudolph Hurt
    3.Base: Francis W. Taylor 3. Base: Dennis J. Egan
    2
    Republicans Democrats
    Left Field: Chas. M. Foell Left Field: John S.Derpa
    Right Field: W.J.Pringle Center Field: J.W.McNiell
    Manager: Frank J. Bennett Righ Field: Thomas F. Scully
    Manager: Michael Zimmer.

    Amission is 50 cents, and every cent goes to the children's home.

    Of course, all the players are well-known. Several of them are extremely well fed,and it will be quite a sight to see them to run for the bases! And then how is the ball to pass Mayor Busse - well, go to the park and see for yourself! -

    On Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the Republican aldermen of Chicago will play a baseball game against the Democratic aldermen of the city, the proceeds to go to the Norwegian ...

    Norwegian
    II B 3, II D 4, I C, V B
  • Scandia -- July 01, 1911
    World's Largest Turbine (Editorial)

    p.8................Uninformed people are prone to ridicule and belittle Norway and Norwegians, as well as American citizens of Norwegian descent, fondly imagining that America always has the largest and best of every known (and unknown) thing. We present here an item of interest to our colony and for the enlightenment (we hope) of detractors of Norway and Norwegians. The world's largest turbine in the world's largest electrical power station has recently been put to work at Vemork Station in Telemark, Norway.

    The plant produces a current of 145,000 H. P. through the ten generators now installed and running. Construction was started late in 1907 and is practically completed. "Rjukan Foss" (Rjukan Falls) is now the world's highest water fall. Throughout Norway, hydraulic stations have been constructed and the percentage of users of electrical current in Norway is greater than either the U.S.A. or Great Britain. Norwegian engineers are always in demand in both these countries.

    p.8................Uninformed people are prone to ridicule and belittle Norway and Norwegians, as well as American citizens of Norwegian descent, fondly imagining that America always has the largest and best of ...

    Norwegian
    I C, V B
  • Scandia -- August 26, 1911
    [An Amazing Incident]

    p.8....Last Monday evening a police officer founda man peacefully asleep on the curb at North Clark St. and Chicago Ave. Something about the man struck the officer as being different from the general run of curb and park bench tenants, so he awakened him and took him to the nearby police station. Upon being questioned as to his identity and residence he slowly shook his head and from his pockets he brought forth $3,500 in currency, and a bank book with a $6,000 balance.

    The man was cared for at the station for the night and an investigation on Tuesday morning finally revealed that the apparent tramp was Torsten Isaacsen Rosgaard, born in Kongsberg, Norway, and that he had been in America fifty years. During this time he had been in the real estate business, in Minnesota and Dakota, and traveled far and wide as a salesman. By hard work, and thrift, he had saved this tidy sum for his old age; he is now eighty-one years of age.

    2

    Mr. Haugan, Norwegian Consul, Chicago, conducted the investigation, and on Wednesday he was appointed guardian for Mr. Rosgaard. The Consul brought the old gentleman to the Tabitha Hospital for care and observation, and is endeavoring to locate relatives of Mr. Rosgard in the U.S.A. and Norway, to care for him. Should he fail to locate such relatives, he will be placed in an Old People's Home, where he will be properly cared for.

    When details of the case were reported to our police commissioner he said, with a dry little smile, "Chicago can't be so bad when an eighty-one year old man with $10,000 in his pockets can sleep, unmolested, on the city curbstones." We agree that this is unusual, to say the least.

    p.8....Last Monday evening a police officer founda man peacefully asleep on the curb at North Clark St. and Chicago Ave. Something about the man struck the officer as being different ...

    Norwegian
    V B, IV
  • Skandinaven -- August 21, 1917
    Four Brothers for the Army

    Four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Gunderson, 4345 North Albany Avenue have been drawn for military service, probably a unique case in Chicago. All the four have passed the required tests, and none of them have claimed exemption so far.

    Mr. and Mrs. Gunderson are Norwegians.

    Four sons of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Gunderson, 4345 North Albany Avenue have been drawn for military service, probably a unique case in Chicago. All the four have passed the ...

    Norwegian
    V B, III D, I G