The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Skandinaven -- September 18, 1872
    [Girls Resent Charges]

    Three industrious shop girls asked Skandinaven to please help them defend the Norwegian girls' reputation in Chicago.

    We may perhaps be mistaken, for that K. L. may be referring to other nationalities in the Amerika of recent date. However, we feel that the Amerika's name should be "Blamerika."

    K. L. states in a translated article in the Amerika that all young girls are crazy about fashionable dresses. The rich girl buys them at $50, but the poor girl cannot afford them, However, she wants to be fashionable, and how can it be done! The answer is that she sells her virtue. He states further that that is why the houses of shame exist.

    Kund Larigelando insinuations we Norwegian girls will not tolerate. We have come to the United States of America, where we get our good, honest pay either as servants or shop girls until we get better positions. But 2it is always enough to keep us dressed respectable, and we do not wish to have our reputation spoiled by a person like L. K. We love our adopted country too much. We have always been respected by the Americans and we intend to remain so. Hence this few lines and thanks to Skandinaven for taking this article.

    Three industrious shop girls asked Skandinaven to please help them defend the Norwegian girls' reputation in Chicago. We may perhaps be mistaken, for that K. L. may be referring to ...

    Norwegian
    I H, I K
  • Skandinaven -- July 31, 1892
    The Diakonisse Hospital and Home

    Lately the daily press has printed a number of vicious articles about the "Norwegian Diakonisse Hospital", and the "Diakonisse Home".

    The lies printed, especially in the Herald, were so vicious and slanderous, that we felt something should be done about it. So we asked the Department of Health to make an investigation. When the investigation was completed, a copy of the report was mailed to the Herald, but that honest (?) newspaper refused to print same, stating that they did not care "a damn" about any report--they knew the truth.

    In order to clear up the situation, we publish the report-which reads as follows:

    2

    City of Chicago, Department of Health

    John D., Wace, M. D., Commissioner

    E. Garrott, M. D., Chief Medical Inspector

    July 28, 1892

    Dear Sir:

    As per your request, I visited the Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Institute at 190 Humboldt Street, yesterday afternoon, and remained there about one hour,carefully inspecting this place, which is also called the Diakonisse Hospital, and all that appertains to its sanitary environs, and herewith respectfully submit the subjoined report for your perusal.

    "The building is a neat two-story and basement frame structure, erected (all aboveground) upon the rear portion of a lot 41x120 ft., and contains 3eight rooms on two floors. Four rooms are on the main floor, with pantries, closets, etc., and four rooms with large closets comprise the second floor. Conveniently located in the basement is a water closet which is flushed thoroughly with water; also the laundry with the necessary conveniences, such as kitchen, drying rooms, etc. The plumbing throughout the building is excellent. The traps are good; above and under the sinks the area is dry, sweet and clean. The rooms are well-lighted and well-ventilated, and without describing everything in detail, such as beds, bedding, floors, facilities for caring for patients, etc., the interior appearance is pleasing and is kept scrupulously clean by the Christian Lutheran Sisters in charge.

    "Some of the rooms are of moderate size, one of the largest is the front room situated on the second floor, and may be named a men's ward. This ward contains four beds; each is occupied by an adult male patient; three of the patients have typhoid fever, two of whom are convalescents, while the 4other bed is occupied by a paralytic male adult. Adjoining this room is a smaller front room with one bed which is occupied by an adult male convalescent typhoid case.

    "To the rear of the large ward just described is a women's ward, occupied by two adult patients, one of whom is an aged woman who is a paralytic case, while the other woman occupant of this ward is Margrita Johnson, age 38, afflicted with uterine cancer. Adjoining this rear women's ward is a smaller women's ward, occupied by two patients, one of whom is a convalescent typhoid patient named Miss Sarah Gunderson, age 56.

    "The other patient occupying this ward is Miss Gertie Figwed, age 23; her malady is phthisis.

    "This concludes the number of patients who occupy the four wards of the second floor, summarized thus:

    5

    Four men and one woman whose illness is of a typhoid character; four of these--three men and one woman--are convalescent; two aged cases, both of whom are paralytics, one male and one female; one case, uterine cancer; one case phthisis pulmonalis; this patient sits up most of the time. This is the young lady referred to above.

    "The front room of the first floor is large and airy, and is occupied by Sister Matie Langanet who is seriously ill with typhoid fever, her illness having already extended over a period of four weeks. Her constant companions or nurses are Sister Bertha Berg, Diakonisse, and Sister Amalia Kittelson, Diakonisse, who alternate night and day in tenderly administering to their afflicted sister; if her illness should prove fatal, it can truthfully be said of her that she gave up her life in devotion to the cause of nursing and relieving others.

    "In addition to the sisters named, there is Sister Esther Koldrup, Secretary 6of the Tabitha Deaconess Society; she, however, does not reside in the hospital as do the others.

    "Reverend N. C. Brun is the estimable president of the Society; his residence is No. 64 Humboldt Blvd.

    "You asked me to report upon the treatment, or rather the disposition of the body of Chas. J. Ellefsen. Mr. Ellefsen died of typhoid fever at the hospital a few days ago. To be exact, his death occurred last Saturday morning, the 23rd; his body was embalmed and placed in a casket, thence carefully removed at 10 A. M. from the second story of the hospital, via the outside stairway leading from the yard to the room where he died. This course was adopted because otherwise the undertaker and his two assistants would have been obliged to pass with the casket containing the body through the room where poor Sister Matie Langanet was ill, before reaching the small house in the rear of the adjacent lot where the remains of Ellefson were placed. This was done carefully and decently, and the casket remained there, carefully secured until 7nine o'clock Sunday morning. There was nothing revolting in this procedure, on the other hand, the improvised death house or morgue has the appearance of cleanliness throughout its interior, and I took special pains to inquire into the condition of these premises also.

    "Pastor Brun preached a funeral sermon Sunday morning, the 24th, over the remains of Ellefson, at the church whence they had been taken for this purpose, and after this Christian service, the remains were borne to one of the cemeteries for interment.

    "While at the hospital I conversed with the pastor and the sisters above-named upon various matters, and also (unaccompanied by any of the attendants) with Carl Oulie, age 23, six weeks ill with typhoid fever; John Johnson, age 34, who had been there four weeks, suffering with this disease; P. S. Lee, age 42, who had been three months ill with typhoid, he having suffered a relapse a few weeks ago; Miss Gertie Figwed who had been there eight weeks, for previously mentioned reasons; Miss Sarah Gunderson, who had been there 8two weeks; Mrs. Margrita Johnson, who had been confined for the past six weeks, and with others, and they all united in expressing the highest words of praise, regarding the universal kindness these sisters had extended to them while at the hospital.

    "The garbage refuse is cremated in the large range in the kitchen. The water used is first boiled, then filtered or strained through a linen cloth, placed in a fine sieve, and afterwards placed in a zinc receptacle in a large refrigerator containing an abundant supply of ice.

    "The alley to the rear of the building, extending north from Cortland Street, is in good condition, no decaying vegetable or organic matter was noticed.

    "The Society operated by these good Sisters charges $7.00, $5.00, and $3.50 per week for nursing, professional services, medicines, food, etc., and in indigent cases (the latter are probably the greater number admitted), no 9charge is made. The hospital was first opened November 1st, 1891. One month later, December 1st, the first patient was admitted, and to date ninety-nine patients in all have been received, one patient having typhoid fever being admitted during the hour and a half that I was at the hospital yesterday. Of this number, six have died from the following diseases:

    "Two of consumption, one of old age (85 I was informed), one of brain disease, and two of typhoid fever. The last named was Ellefson who was brought to the hospital in a moribund condition, and was not expected to recover.

    "The Society admits sufferers from all types of disease except small pox, scarlet fever and diphtheria. Patients of all creeds and nationalities are admitted, although to date none but Scandinavians have applied for admission. I might state in addition to those I have named, that there are other women nurses, besides two scrub women, one washerwoman, one cook, and one night watchman.

    "So far as I am aware, this is the first hospital of the kind established by 10this Society anywhere in the West, and I am pleased to add in conclusion that there are other points I could suggest in this report is necessary. The fact that this Society is performing a Christian and noble duty, their devotion to cause and principle, almost without hope of pecuniary reward, I may say, should merit success and the best wishes of a well-disposed and philanthropic public".

    Very respectfully yours,

    Liston H. Montgomery,

    Medical Inspector.

    Lately the daily press has printed a number of vicious articles about the "Norwegian Diakonisse Hospital", and the "Diakonisse Home". The lies printed, especially in the Herald, were so vicious ...

    Norwegian
    II D 3, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, I K, IV
  • Skandinaven -- December 31, 1896
    The Norwegian Hospital and its Training School for Nurses

    The first two nurses trained at the Norwegian Hospital (Tabitha) have received their diplomas. It was two years ago that the nurses' school at the hospital was opened. The superintendent, Mr. Oscar Torrison, congratulated the staff on its success, and said:

    "On behalf of the Norwegian Lutheran Tabitha Society of Chicago and its board of directors, I wish to bid you all a hearty welcome to the first graduating exercises of the Norwegian Lutheran Tabitha Hospital Training School for nurses.

    "Our hospital and training school for nurses have been in existence a little over two years. I congratulate the society upon having passed through these two years without any loss or accident by fire or the 2elements, and upon the fact that during these two years of financial depression and hard times, the hospital has been able not only to live, but to relieve much suffering and want among the poor, unfortunate, and sick Scandinavians of our community. During these two years, our hospital has rendered 3,442 days of service to charity patients and 926 to those that are classed as half charity patients. That we have been able to do this much for the cause of charity is largely due to the self-sacrifice of the women of our society, who with so much kindness and sympathy, have devoted themselves to the cause represented by the hospital.

    "I congratulate the society upon having so many noble women enlisted in its cause, and I congratulate them upon the success which has crowned their efforts. Our hospital is fortunate, and is to be congratulated, too, upon the great interest that has been taken in it by its able medical and surgical staff members who have devoted so much of their valuable 3time to the advancement of the hospital, to the medical attendance and surgical aid offered not only to hospital patients who have been able to pay for themselves, but also to the charity patients who have been so unfortunate as to need medical or surgical aid without having means of their own to secure it.

    "I should like to pause here to pay a tribute of respect and thanks, on behalf of the Society and its board of directors, to that distinguished surgeon who stands at the head of our surgical staff--our surgeon-in-chief--I refer to Dr. C. Fenger (a Dane), whose high ideals in regard to his noble profession and whose greatness of heart have led him to give so much of his valuable time and skill to our hospital for the cause of humanity and charity. We thank him for it; we congratulate ourselves upon having it.

    "The nurses in our training school are to be congratulated upon the opportunity afforded then of getting their knowledge and instruction from 4men of such high standing in their profession. Our society has reason to congratulate itself upon the further fact, that in the selection of applicants for admission to the training school, we have found a corps of nurses whose ambition to succeed in their calling, whose devotion to their duty, whose conduct and behavior during their connection with our institution have been a constant source of gratification to our board of directors. Of our first graduating class, the class that graduates this evening; Mrs. Amelia Wandell and Miss Balborg Brekke, I am glad to be able to say, conscientiously, that they have the confidence and respect of the entire board of directors, and that we feel and believe that in the career which they are now about to carve out for themselves, they will not only reflect credit upon the institution from which they graduate for proficiency in their chosen profession, but, that wherever duty calls them, they will go with the devotion of the true woman and the true nurse upon their mission of charity among the sick.

    5

    "Others will speak to you of the importance of trained nurses to the community. Others will talk to you of our training school, of charity and of other matters. I wish only to speak by way of introduction, to bid you welcome and to say to you that we have a hospital: bright, cheerful and homelike; well-equipped for giving medical and surgical aid; an operating room, much praised by the attending surgeons; a larger staff of Scandinavian physicians, surgeons and specialists than any other hospital in the country and containing many men eminent in their professions and in their specialties.

    "Yet the real work of the hospital has only just begun. It remains with a generous public, and for the future to bring it to that full measure of usefulness which the nobleness of the cause deserves, and which we hope and believe it will attain."

    Mr. Torreson was followed by Dr. Hetoen, who delivered his address.

    6

    After referring to the methods of caring for the sick in olden times and during the Middle Ages, he showed that the modern training school for nurses was essentially an American institution, the first effort in this direction having been made in the Philadelphia Lying-in Charity Hospital, in 1828.

    "The American training schools have reached the highest degree of excellence, and the evolution of the training school and the trained nurse was traced to the higher value now being placed upon human life and health, as shown by the universal efforts made to improve the sanitary conditions and to give the sick and injured the most intelligent care.

    "Nursing is no longer a low, menial occupation, but trained nursing is an art and a science. In America it is looked upon as a dignified profession, the followers of which are women of refinement and some culture.

    7

    "Sickness is universal and trained nurses are, in reality, just as much a necessity, perhaps more so, in the country than in the city. The field for the activity of the trained nurse, especially among the Norwegian settlers, is practically unlimited. As long as birth, sickness and death do not pass away, trained nurses will remain a necessity; this being so, the quality of the nurse is not a matter of indifference, but of profound interest to the sick as well as to the healthy.

    "The trained nurse is the right hand of the physician and surgeon. Many a case of sickness recovers more because of good nursing than as a result of the doctor's skill. Trained nurses relieve a vast amount of needless suffering of the curable as well as incurable sick. 'When I come to die,' says Gross, America's greatest surgeon, 'give me plenty of light and fresh air in my room; and at my bedside, a trained and kind nurse.'

    "The qualities that make the trained nurse so indispensable were stated 8to be: good health, neat habits; kindness, patience, and a sweet temper; a discreet tongue; good judgment; and alertness of mind--a rare combination, but, when present in some degree, and improved by training, the requirements of the sick room would be fulfilled. Poor, indifferent nurses are often dangerous persons, liable to degenerate into gossips, vendors of wonderful cures, illicit practitioners of medicine, and frauds. The lack of proper knowledge on the part of the honest, untrained nurse, stands in the way of her usefulness, even though she may have the 'knack' of nursing in the highest degree. The trained nurse not only knows but feels that the secrets of the sick room are sacred. Her pride in, and consciousness of, the dignity of her calling prevent her from ever becoming quack. She knows that to be honest and punctual in following the directions of the doctor is her first duty. She knows the hygiene of the sick room, of the patient, of her own person. She aims to have only pleasant impressions reach the patient, and sheds light and courage about her which rob disease of half its fears and pangs.

    9

    "The trained nurse must be trained in heart, in hand, and in mind. This requires hospitals. American hospitals, in general, have training schools for nurses. In Chicago, all the hospitals have training schools, except Catholic hospitals and a few others. This fact alone shows that the training school is considered to bring the best and the largest results. It does, indeed, give the best nurses to the hospital, because there is a general belief that whenever we do a practical thing and teach others how to do it, then we do it best and most carefully. The graduate nurses continue the good work of the hospital outside of its walls; maybe in places where it is even more necessary.

    "The Norwegian Hospital is to be congratulated upon having established, so early in its career, a training school with comprehensive, modern, and the best views. The public, which naturally contributes to this hospital, should have just as much interest in its training school, as in its work of caring for the sick in its wards and rooms. As each year sees a small flock of trained nurses pass out to earn their living 10and do good, the work and influence of the hospital are extended. The friends and well-wishers of the hospital should never forget that the training school for nurses is the best way to enlarge the scope of the work of the hospital and at the same time secure the best kind of nursing for the patients in the hospital.

    "It should be the duty of the individual father of a family, as well as his privilege, to secure the best attention in case of sickness or ailment of any kind, by either having the patient enter the hospital or by transforming the private dwelling into a temporary hospital. In sickness, so far as economy in money is concerned, relief from pain and suffering, saving time, the best hope for a speedy recovery are secured by availing oneself early of the best means now in existence for the care of the sick, namely: the careful physician, the modern hospital, and the trained nurse.

    ...."The first nurses to leave the hospital were loath to go. They said they 11would feel the loss of continued training. It seemed that probationary nurses taking their places were happy.

    "The hospital stands as a monument to Scandinavian thrift and culture. May it, thus, stand forever!"

    The first two nurses trained at the Norwegian Hospital (Tabitha) have received their diplomas. It was two years ago that the nurses' school at the hospital was opened. The superintendent, ...

    Norwegian
    II D 3, II D 10, III B 2, II A 1, I C, I K, I M, IV
  • Skandinaven -- March 28, 1898
    Ladies on Wheels (Letter)

    Editor of Skandinaven.

    Dear Sir: I think the columns for the young people are very interesting and I would like to say a few words in behalf of the ladies on wheels.

    In the first place, there is no exercise that sets the blood tingling through a person's veins quicker than a short trip on a bicycle. I could advise nothing better for a lady that has to stand behind the counter of some dry goods store or tailor shop, than to own a bicycle and take a spin in the fresh air on her way home for her meals. And if she has any spare moments she may take a trip out into the open country, as fresh air cannot always be had in large cities. On the other hand, if she were to follow the advice of a previous writer, she would have to trudge home afoot with her body already overtired.

    As to bicycle riders being deformed, I think they were that way long before 2they got their wheels. One thing I know is that it has not deformed me, and I rode over five hundred miles last fall, and the only time I could ride was Sundays because I had work to do during the week. I used to take my wheel on Sunday morning and visit distant churches, which I could not have done if I had not had a wheel. And I cannot see why a lady should not go to church on a bicycle, instead of going on foot in the company of some one who may be of no interest to her.

    Editor of Skandinaven. Dear Sir: I think the columns for the young people are very interesting and I would like to say a few words in behalf of the ladies ...

    Norwegian
    I K
  • Skandinaven -- March 28, 1898
    Ladies on Wheels (Letter)

    Editor of Skandinaven.

    Dear Sir: I think the columns for the young people are very interesting and I would like to say a few words in behalf of the ladies on wheels.

    In the first place, there is no exercise that sets the blood tingling through a person's veins quicker than a short trip on a bicycle. I could advise nothing better for a lady that has to stand behind the counter of some dry goods store or tailor shop, than to own a bicycle and take a spin in the fresh air on her way home for her meals. And if she has any spare moments she may take a trip out into the open country,as fresh air cannot always be had in large cities. On the other hand, if she were to follow the advice of a previous writer, she would have to trudge home afoot with her body already overtired.

    As to bicycle riders being deformed, I think they were that way long before 2they got their wheels. One thing I know is that it has not deformed me, and I rode over five hundred miles last fall, and the only time I could ride was Sundays because I had work to do during the week. I used to take my wheel on Sunday morning and visit distant churches, which I could not have done if I had not had a wheel. And I cannot see why a lady should not go to church on a bicycle, instead of going on foot in the company of some one who may be of no interest to her.

    Editor of Skandinaven. Dear Sir: I think the columns for the young people are very interesting and I would like to say a few words in behalf of the ladies ...

    Norwegian
    I K
  • Skandinaven -- November 28, 1898
    Schoolma'ms and Wives (Article in English)

    Mr. Thompson shows a decided preference for the schoolma'm above any other class of women. Now, unfortunately, I have never possessed the necessary accomplishments for obtaining or holding a position as a teacher, but I fully realize that a teacher occupies a very responsible position in society and that we should always be ready to praise her efforts and give her due honor and consideration. Certainly, none of us feel disposed to criticize Mr. Thompson for praising the work of the schoolma'm; we all entertain similar ideas in greater or lesser degree.

    But what, actually, is the social problem that Mr. Thompson has apparently so successfully solved to his own satisfaction? He is evidently not in search of the ideal schoolma'm, but is, or has been once upon a time, in search of an ideal wife, and he now wishes to impart some of his valuable experience to others.

    2

    I do not wish to cast any discredit upon the profession of the schoolma'm, but I must frankly confess that, in my estimation, Mr. Thompson exhibits a greater amount of cheek and audacity than is usually found among social reformers of his class. He positively declares, "without any mental reservation," that in seeking for an ideal wife, "the schoolma'ms should inevitably be given the first consideration in making a choice." Schoolma'ms frequently get married, and it would not seem strange to anyone that Mr. Thompson should see fit to choose his "ideal" from their ranks; but it does seem strange, indeed, that he utterly ignores the many virtues that are found in women of other callings in life, and even finds occasion to speak of them in a derogatory way, and to dismiss them as ignorant and narrow-minded. We can well imagine how such assertions, entirely unfounded, strike the tender feelings of many a good cook or seamstress who is humbly and faithfully trying to supply those things that may call forth the sunshine of happiness, and cause it to be reflected upon the countenance of everyone around her.

    Mr. Thompson appeals to common sense. I wish to ask him to bring his common sense into play, and to tell us in what respect his favorite class is better 3fitted to maintain a good and happy home than a representative of any of the other classes that he mentions. Now, anyone who possesses just a little common sense and is willing to reason can readily see that there is a vast amount of difference between the home and the schoolroom. The work of the schoolma'm may resemble that of a mother in a few things, but in a great many things of equal weight and importance her work bears no relation to the happiness of the home. Is it not a fact that the work of the domestic, the dressmaker and the dishwasher stands more closely related to the duties of an ideal wife than does the work of anyone else, schoolma'ms not excepted? Not only the success and happiness of the home are dependent upon the work of these three classes, but even the success of a schoolma'm, as she performs her work in the schoolroom, is entirely dependent upon them.

    Then why should Mr. Thompson throw so much discredit upon these classes, and give the schoolma'm all honor for perpetuating the principles laid down by our forefathers? Does he really think that this precious inheritance would long be preserved, if it were not for the faithful and effective work of the domestic, the dressmaker, and the dishwasher? Does he really think that a 4few dry facts, gained through the study of history, literature, and so forth, and stored away in some corner of his ideal schoolma'm's head, are going to aid her in overcoming the various obstacles that she may possibly meet with in a home? Don't build too much upon these things; you may rue it when it is too late.

    Mr. Thompson says that Patrick Henry did not gain much knowledge by looking into the potato kettle. The potato kettle is not everything in a well-regulated home, but a home does not have everything unless it has a well-regulated potato kettle. Patrick Henry possibly did not gain a great amount of knowledge in his home, but he, as well as all of our truly great men, gained something of far greater value, something that forms good clean character, which can only be built up under the influence of a good home. You may praise the knowledge necessary for obtaining a second- or third-class certificate of a schoolma'm, and yet it will always remain an inadequate factor in the maintenance of a successful home. I simply ask you to place your multiplication table and table of logarithms alongside a table of well-prepared and tastefully arranged food, and then let anyone judge which of these will exert the greater influence.

    5

    It is useless to call one's attention to the fact that there are other accomplishments necessary in the formation and maintenance of a happy home than simply the ability to tell who was the first President; there are other duties than simply sharpening lead pencils and whitewashing blackboards. Yet, in the face of these self-evident facts, Mr. Thompson places these many good qualities and praiseworthy accomplishments beyond all consideration, and positively asserts that, in seeking an ideal, the garland of honor should be placed upon the head of a schoolma'm in preference to anyone else.

    Mr. Thompson evidently would think it disgraceful that his ideal should spend any of her time in the kitchen or the dressmaker's shop. Now, does he mean to say that, by reason of his favorite schoolma'm's knowing the particulars concerning the death of Sitting Bull, his bread will be of better quality, his butter possess a finer flavor, or the aroma of his coffee be more inviting, or does he mean to say that these attainments in a home are of no value? I do not mean to infer that it is impossible for a schoolma'm to become a good housekeeper, but we have every reason to believe that in preparing herself for her chosen profession, and later in following it, she will not pay any particular 6attention to domestic cares, and consequently cannot develop much in that direction.

    You talk about the development of the finer senses and the ability to talk intelligently along the various educational lines. But humanity is generally so constituted that these finer qualities are dependent upon one's physical being, and, consequently, in order to nourish these higher thoughts and finer feelings, one's physical wants must be supplied.

    The success and happiness of the human family is dependent upon all classes who pursue an honorable course; it is simply ridiculous for anyone to show contempt for one class and to honor another. The more one thinks of it, the more ridiculous it seems. For an illustration, we will suppose that Mr. Thompson's ideal was not the possessor of these ordinary and valueless accomplishments of the domestic and the dishwasher, as he seems inclined to put it, but instead was the possessor of what in his estimation constitutes a highly cultivated mind that can see and appreciate the beautiful and the sublime. Now, what would be the result if a ten-year-old boy should enter the dining room about 7six o'clock, with the expectation of getting a good supper, and, on finding that the table had not been cleared since their last meal, would enter the parlor and there find his mother deeply absorbed in reading Shakespeare or Dickens? Could she satisfy him by quoting select passages from either of these famous authors, by calling his attention to the Stars and Stripes in some part of the room, or by begging him to notice the glowing sunset and the beautiful colors of the rainbow? Will any of these things satisfy or even please him? No! He will simply cast a hasty glance at things in general, leave the room, and hasten to find one of his comrades, whose mother possibly never possessed the necessary ability to teach school. He will accompany him to his home, enjoy the hospitality there, get a good square meal, and feel satisfied. This is only human nature. When we return to our home after a day's work, possibly tired and hungry, the music of the frying pan and the sight of a well-arranged kitchen seem just as dear to us as the finest selection that may be rendered upon the piano. The latter is good, but the former must come first.

    Mr. Thompson apparently thinks that the term "education" involves only such 8knowledge as may be obtained from books. But education comprises something more than this. Every member of society who faithfully applies himself to the furtherance of a good cause is a truly educated man or woman. All classes are doing work of vital importance, and all are entitled to receive their due honor. It is, therefore, absolutely unreasonable to bestow honor upon one class of society at the expense of another. We will do well to bear in mind always that "Honor and fame from no condition rise", but that these are only a reward for an honest and faithful effort governed by a good intention. In closing, Mr. Thompson, we city girls should have some chance.

    Mr. Thompson shows a decided preference for the schoolma'm above any other class of women. Now, unfortunately, I have never possessed the necessary accomplishments for obtaining or holding a position ...

    Norwegian
    I B 3 a, I K
  • Skandinaven -- March 13, 1899
    Woman Suffrage

    Shall the coming generation of women be permitted to vote, or shall they continue to obey the laws made by men without a murmur? It has been said, and truly so, that "the peculiar mission of women is to become wives and mothers." Is it not as true, that the peculiar mission of men is to become husbands and fathers? They are to be each other's helpmate. They are alike bound to protect and educate their children, and to perform the other duties of parents. The private improvement of self and the public improvement of society rest on them both.

    Women must be subject to the same laws as men; why can she not have a voice in the making of these laws? The truth is that men like to monopolize the power, and they hold up passive obedience as the fittest type of womanliness. Of course, women have their faults; many are vain and like the flattery of the stronger sex; but remember there are all kinds and degrees of women as well as 2of men. The question is not what women desire; it is what is right and best for the average woman. Some say the women are not qualified. What about four-fifths of the men, whose votes can be bought at a very low price? Are they better qualified? Let us have a law for the qualification of voters and not of sex.

    The "son of Adam" knows women to be a step or two lower than men, both in physical power and intelligence. I wonder what kind of a mother he has that he can display such knowledge of all the low meanness which can be found in a woman's character. Remember my friends, God Almighty made women to match men. You forget that women have not had any liberty until the last fifty years. If you will take a peep out of your grave about two hundred years hence, you will most likely be astonished by the work done by women, for they are progressing and do not intend to stop.

    Shall the coming generation of women be permitted to vote, or shall they continue to obey the laws made by men without a murmur? It has been said, and truly ...

    Norwegian
    I K
  • Skandinaven -- April 13, 1899
    Woman Suffrage (Editorial in English)

    Recently a reader asked if the coming generation of women shall cast a vote or if they shall continue obeying the rules made by man. The women have now for nearly nineteen hundred years obeyed the rules made by man, and what wonderful progress has not the world made! Would woman suffrage have abolished slavery in the United States any sooner than it was done? Would it have destroyed Spanish tyranny in Cuba any sooner than it was done? Remember what wonderful progress has been made in the United States during these last two hundred years. Could it have been possible for the American people to have prospered any more than they have done if the women had had the right to vote? We think not.

    We now live in a wonderful age of prosperity, and when you have a good thing keep it. A woman should not interfere with a man's business because "too many cooks spoil the broth".

    Recently a reader asked if the coming generation of women shall cast a vote or if they shall continue obeying the rules made by man. The women have now for ...

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  • Skandinaven -- August 14, 1899
    Let the Women Vote

    Should women have the right of suffrage? A great many say no and attempt to give some reasons for their positions, but these reasons either contradict one another or else are so ridiculous that they cannot settle to the ground. There is no solid foundation to build them upon. The class of people that do not have a right to vote are lunatics, criminals, insane people--and women. What an injustice to include women in that class! It is a shame! How long will the women tolerate it?

    People say this is a free country, where all have equal rights. If so, why do not women have the right to vote? Or are they not included in the "all"? It appears to me that women are in the same condition as The Old Thirteen [Colonies]. Do they not have to abide by the laws that are made, without having any voice in the making thereof? Are they not taxed without being represented in the government? Are they allowed to have anything to say about taxes? No, all they have to do is just to pay them.

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    Again, we say that "the majority rules". Does that mean the majority of the people, the citizens, or does it mean the majority of the voters? And when we boast of having a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, we do not seem to remember that women are people too. There has been a theory entertained by some, that if women get the right to vote they will have to exchange places with men--give up the kitchen and assume the duties of men. If that is what we call women's rights, let them never be granted. Let women and men stay where they belong on that point; but let women help form the government that governs them as well as men.

    Should women have the right of suffrage? A great many say no and attempt to give some reasons for their positions, but these reasons either contradict one another or else ...

    Norwegian
    I K
  • Skandinaven -- September 05, 1899
    Not Wanted at the Ballot

    In some articles favoring woman suffrage it has been asserted that our women are kept back by their male brothers who deny them the rights which would bring them up to the level of men. If given the right of suffrage, a right which is not her right, women would, it is said, strike the first blow of reform by choking the liquor traffic.

    It seems to be an easy task on paper, in resolutions, etc.; but, alas, just think of it for a moment! These weaklings that need the protection of men, even while going a few blocks to church in the evening, to say nothing of their more distant expeditions into this world of danger, claim to be able to crush such a mighty power as the liquor organizations! Never on earth can they do it. Consequently, the argument of giving women the right of suffrage on that basis is out of place.

    Still we hear the everlasting plea for women's rights. But let us raise the question: What rights are they enjoying, and what more do they demand? Meet 2a lady on our streets, and if circumstances demand, you have to give her the right of way every time. You get into a crowded railway coach or streetcar and pay your hard cash for a seat; but if a woman enters she has undisputed right to your seat if the seats are all occupied. She has the advantage of men in the courtroom, a very sacred advantage. In war the order is given to save the women. On sinking ships, with open watery graves on all sides, the captain's first order, after the boats are lowered, is "women first".

    Poor creatures, how I sympathize with them when we hear the cry that they are robbed of their rights and privileges by us poor males. The most substantial argument against woman suffrage is that the best of women do not want to vote. These women say it is not their mission to mix in vulgar, currupt politics, as they have a grander and nobler calling to fill at home. They are not willing to exchange the exalted position they occupy in the minds of brave and honest men for the privilege, so unbecoming a woman, of mixing in modern politics. The grave difficulties confronting our government today strain the abilities of men who have spent nearly a lifetime in public service. Right here I want to ask the question: What could these delicate things, with their 3"riot act" theories, do if put in the places of the men? Let us assume the dear creatures have a majority in Congress and a Frances Willard for President, and that circumstances should arise which necessitated a declaration of war. Would it be justice that one class of our race that is unable to go to war should have the privilege and power to order the other class into mortal combat, to kill or be killed? Arbitration--Oh, how seldom it prevails!

    Ladies, be thankful that you can stay at home and be protected. The ballot box never was intended for you.

    In some articles favoring woman suffrage it has been asserted that our women are kept back by their male brothers who deny them the rights which would bring them up ...

    Norwegian
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