The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- July 31, 1872
    [Immigration Statistics]

    Last year's Norwegian immigration to the United States amounted to 11,985. Of this number 9, 085 came from farms and 2,900 from cities.

    Last year's Norwegian immigration to the United States amounted to 11,985. Of this number 9, 085 came from farms and 2,900 from cities.

    Norwegian
    III G
  • Skandinaven -- February 25, 1879
    Limitation of Immigration from China (Editorial)

    Some time ago the House Representatives passed a bill, the chief provision of which was to forbid the captain of any ship arriving in the port of a State which restricts immigration to have aboard more than fifteen Chinese immigrants. A few days later this bill was also passed by the Senate, the only amendment being that Chinese diplomatic representatives and persons planning to stay in this country for only a short period of time for educational purposes shall be exempted from the provisions of the bill. The House will probably pass the bill in its amended form, and if so, only the President's signature is required to make it the law of the land.

    The question has been subjected to heated discussion in the American press. The idea of discriminating against any particular race is something new in this country, and some people see in it a manifestation of the "Know-Nothing" 2movement which was so widespread some twenty-five years ago.

    An influential, not numerous, group see in unrestricted Chinese immigration the means of keeping wages at a low level, and undoubtedly, in the opinion of many Americans, this is the all-important factor to consider in regard to the Chinese question.

    Undeniably, it sounds well to proclaim to the world that our country is a refuge and a haven for any race or class under the sun, but when this kind of philantrophic sentiment is tested in the laboratory of practical life, many unforeseen difficulties are encountered.

    The opposition to Chinese immigration is greatest in those localities where the native population comes in closest contact with the Mongols, and its intensity is inversely proportional to the distance.

    The Chinese cling with great tenacity to inherited customs, traditions, and 3prejudices; they do not mingle well with the rest of our population; they even display a certain contempt for everybody not belonging to the slant-eyed race. They are becoming alarmingly numerous on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, and only reluctantly do they comply with our regulations; they worship their own gods, traffic in women and children, and have small regard for marriage and family life.

    Fearing our laws, they do not openly practice the way of living that they really desire, but their stay in this country does not weaken their oriental tendencies, and if they think that they can get away with it, they trade in human lives and commit other nefarious crimes particularly abhorrent to Americans. Experience has taught us that in communities where they have settled in considerable numbers and gained a solid foothold the social order has become disrupted, and the sense of decency blunted, and a general degeneration and lowering of moral standards have ensued. Under such circumstances it is desirable to pass laws preventing too heavy an influx of Chinese.

    4

    To be sure, the great reduction of wages on the Pacific coast caused by Chinese immigration has been very profitable for a few capitalists and industrialists, but it is generally agreed that this immigration as a whole [is evil in its effect], and it is therefore the simple duty of the Congress to enact protective measures.

    Some time ago the House Representatives passed a bill, the chief provision of which was to forbid the captain of any ship arriving in the port of a State which ...

    Norwegian
    I C, I H, III G
  • Skandinaven -- April 27, 1880
    Chicago as a Harbor

    Now that the Welland Canal is completed, we can soon expect ocean traffic from Norway. We look forward to seeing our ships, because they will be a link with home. The completion of the Canal will, we think, be a boon to immigrants to Chicago and the Central States.

    Now that the Welland Canal is completed, we can soon expect ocean traffic from Norway. We look forward to seeing our ships, because they will be a link with home. ...

    Norwegian
    III H, III G
  • Skandinaven -- June 08, 1880
    People or Cattle? (Editorial)

    More than eighty thousand immigrants arrived at New York during the last few months.

    They were packed in the boats like cattle, sleeping on the decks or wherever they could find a place to lie down.

    Although few of the transatlantic boats have accommodations for more than one thousand people, between fourteen and fifteen hundred persons were usually packed in each of these ships.

    Many complain of the food and sanitation aboard. It is high time that legislation is passed to remedy these conditions.

    More than eighty thousand immigrants arrived at New York during the last few months. They were packed in the boats like cattle, sleeping on the decks or wherever they could ...

    Norwegian
    III G, I M
  • Skandinaven -- June 22, 1880
    Norwegian-Danish Immigration

    In the month of May, twenty-five hundred Norwegians and two thousand Danes landed in New York. This brings the total number for the year up to about one hundred and thirty thousand.

    Many of these Scandinavians are now scattered all over the United States.

    In the month of May, twenty-five hundred Norwegians and two thousand Danes landed in New York. This brings the total number for the year up to about one hundred and ...

    Norwegian
    III G, III G
  • Skandinaven -- March 22, 1881
    "Price War"

    Of late not only the railroads but also the transatlantic steamship lines have been carrying on a bitter "price war." They have reduced their rates considerably. The railroads now charge one dollar to travel from New York to Chicago. The steamship companies charge ten dollars for the trip from Norway or Denmark to New York.

    The result has been that thousands of Scandinavians are now taking advantage of these opportune rates to come to America. As a result, the colony here in Chicago has nearly doubled in the last year.

    Of late not only the railroads but also the transatlantic steamship lines have been carrying on a bitter "price war." They have reduced their rates considerably. The railroads now charge ...

    Norwegian
    III G
  • Skandinaven -- March 29, 1881
    The Scandinavian Immigrant Aid Society

    The Scandinavian Immigrant Aid Society has been formed here and officers have been elected.

    The purpose of the Society is to aid all Scandinavian immigrants who stop over here in Chicago on their way west.

    It is planned to operate a hotel on a non-profit basis.

    The Scandinavian Immigrant Aid Society has been formed here and officers have been elected. The purpose of the Society is to aid all Scandinavian immigrants who stop over here in ...

    Norwegian
    II D 1, III G
  • Skandinaven -- September 03, 1882
    Scandinavians in Chicago

    Today there are twenty-nine thousand Swedes, sixteen thousand Norwegians, and five thousand Danes in Chicago.

    Today there are twenty-nine thousand Swedes, sixteen thousand Norwegians, and five thousand Danes in Chicago.

    Norwegian
    III G, III G, III G
  • Skandinaven -- March 31, 1883
    Scandinavian Immigration

    The total Scandinavian immigration has reached a peak that will surprise many. The totals in the thirty-seven states are as follows: 64,196 Danes, 194,337 Swedes and 181,729 Norwegians. In Wisconsin we find the largest number of Danes, in Minnesota, the most Swedes, and in Illinois, the most Norwegians.

    The totals in the nine territories are: Danes--10,697, Norwegians--5,644, and Swedes--8,623. In Utah the majority are Danes and Swedes, in Dakota, Norwegians.

    These figures indicate that the hardiest pioneer spirit is found among the Danes and Norwegians since they are the two most populous in the territories. These figures also show that there are nearly five hundred thousand Scandinavians in America.

    Just. think what this would mean if this total were doubled in the next twenty years, [a possibility which is not too remote].

    The total Scandinavian immigration has reached a peak that will surprise many. The totals in the thirty-seven states are as follows: 64,196 Danes, 194,337 Swedes and 181,729 Norwegians. In Wisconsin ...

    Norwegian
    III G, III G, III G
  • Skandinaven -- March 18, 1889
    Immigration

    More than sixty thousand Scandinavians arrived in the United States in 1888. About twenty thousand came to Chicago.

    More than sixty thousand Scandinavians arrived in the United States in 1888. About twenty thousand came to Chicago.

    Norwegian
    III G