The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- March 20, 1872
    [Protest Naming of Pastors]

    With all due respect for Norwegian pastors and in behalf of my countrymen, I object emphatically against having any pastor appointed as director for any library. Poor Mayor Medill, if you do appoint ministers for such jobs, I am afraid the church will excommunicate you. Don't send the minister in the fight for the free library.

    With all due respect for Norwegian pastors and in behalf of my countrymen, I object emphatically against having any pastor appointed as director for any library. Poor Mayor Medill, if ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 a, III C
  • Skandinaven -- April 18, 1872
    Jewish Mission Meet

    The Norwegian Lutheran Jewish Mission's Ladies Society will have its quarterly meeting in Zian's Church at Patomac and Artesian Avenues on Sunday afternoon, the 21st of April at 3 P.M. The Pastors, H. A. Hanson, Geo. T. Rygh, J. J. Skarpness, and O. K. Espeseth will deliver the speeches.

    The Norwegian Lutheran Jewish Mission's Ladies Society will have its quarterly meeting in Zian's Church at Patomac and Artesian Avenues on Sunday afternoon, the 21st of April at 3 P.M. ...

    Norwegian
    III C, I C
  • Skandinaven -- August 14, 1872
    [Build Large Assembly Hall]

    A big assembly hall has been built by the Chicago Norwegians at the Methodist camp-meeting grounds of Chicago. A meeting is to be held there from August 15th to August 22nd.

    A big assembly hall has been built by the Chicago Norwegians at the Methodist camp-meeting grounds of Chicago. A meeting is to be held there from August 15th to August ...

    Norwegian
    III C, II A 2
  • Skandinaven -- October 16, 1872
    [Relief Appeal Brings Results]

    The Norwegian Emergency Committee had its meeting the 10th of October. Mr. Ole Birkeland was elected chairman, Pastor Krognass, secretary, and Pastor Krahn, cashier. The first thing attempted by the group was to make an appeal to all Norwegian from coast to coast to help the fire sufferers.

    Almost immediately this resulted in the arrival of boxes of clothes from Madison, Wis., and later on sums of money. The committee collected $1,042, of which $300 came from people not belonging to any Norwegian churches and $200 from Augustana Synoden, the balance from the Norwegian Synods. The different churches received all together $7,800 from various churches which was distributed amongst the needy in their neighborhood.

    The Norwegian Emergency Committee had its meeting the 10th of October. Mr. Ole Birkeland was elected chairman, Pastor Krognass, secretary, and Pastor Krahn, cashier. The first thing attempted by the ...

    Norwegian
    II D 10, III C
  • Skandinaven -- January 21, 1876
    [Issue Call to New Pastor]

    The members of, "Our Saviour's Congregation;" have agreed to invite the Rev. Ylvisaker from Minnesota to succeed the Rev. Krohn as their pastor; and so the idea of uniting the two larger congregations of the Norwegian Synod and make the Rev. Mikkelsen their pastor, has been abandoned. According to our information the main reason for abandoning the idea were; that both congregations' financial affairs would become too complicated; that donors might lost interest in a united church; and that the location of the churches and the residences of the members made unification undesirable.

    The members of, "Our Saviour's Congregation;" have agreed to invite the Rev. Ylvisaker from Minnesota to succeed the Rev. Krohn as their pastor; and so the idea of uniting the ...

    Norwegian
    III C
  • Skandinaven -- May 28, 1878
    [Interesting Discussion Held]

    In our Saviour's Church a very interesting discussion took place last Thursday. The question was, "Punishment after death as pictured by Pastor W. Becker, Dr. Thomas, and others".

    It must be admitted that the subject brought many things to light, which would have been very good for the ears of our unfaithful. Pastors Juul and Mikkelsen and Dr. Julson were present to answer any questions. The church was full to the last seat.

    In our Saviour's Church a very interesting discussion took place last Thursday. The question was, "Punishment after death as pictured by Pastor W. Becker, Dr. Thomas, and others". It must ...

    Norwegian
    III C, II B 2 g
  • Chicago Tribune -- June 12, 1890
    The Norwegian Lutherans United

    This morning three of the five divisions of the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America, opened what is destined to be the most important convention ever held by that denomination. For two years negotations have been going on between the anti-Missourians, the Norwegian-Danish conference, the Angustana Synod and the Hange Synod with a view to a union of their disunited church. Although in sympathy with the movement the Hange Synod is not yet prepared to enter the union, but will no doubt do so during the coming year, of the other three, each division will hold separate meetings, at which the affairs of the old organization are to be wound up and the constitution and articles of union, which have been particularly agreed upon, adopted. Then the United Norwegian Lutheran Church of America will be a reality.

    The Norwegian Lutheran Synod a distinct body from the above, and which has been in annual session here, denounced the Bennett law today. The principal underlying 2the law was admitted to be just. The state was justified in demanding that its citizens should receive a certain degree of education. The Bennett law went further and deprived the parents of the right to educate their children. The law was more of Russian than of our own free country. Ansbury Seminary will be endowed with $115,000.00 and will be the theological school of the United Society.

    This morning three of the five divisions of the Norwegian Lutheran Church in America, opened what is destined to be the most important convention ever held by that denomination. For ...

    Norwegian
    III C, I A 1 a
  • Skandinaven -- August 20, 1891
    A Movement of Importance to Chicago

    Every legitimate effort for the Christian culture and Americanization of the young people of foreign extraction in our city should meet with the hearty support and encouragement of all good men. Hitherto no movement better calculated to reach this goal has been inaugurated than the mission work now being organized by the United Norwegian Lutheran church of the North West. It may not be generally known that this Church is the result of an effort for the union of the various factions in the Lutheran church which, for many years, has been rent by doctrinal discord. The union of three of these factions was accomplished a year ago, and the United Church is showing a commendable zeal in a wiser and more wholesome work than in dogmatic hairsplitting. This Church now numbers about three hundred ministers and one hundred thousand church members or communicants. Cessation from learned debates has given the church the leisure to look about and it has discovered that its young people are rapidly drifting away from the church and from all religious association. Especially in the great cities are they more likely to be influenced by the saloons than by 2any civilizing and elevating institutions. This demoralization has largely resulted from the dissensions in their church, and the consequent failure to provide adequate places of worship attractive to the young, and an opportunity to study the English language, which is preferred by the young Scandinavians. Fortunately, the Church is now beginning to see the error of its ways, and the United Church, especially, is putting forth vigorous efforts in order to recapture the young people, and throw about them the influences of Christian refinement in the true spirit, and in the free use of the language of their choice, which is the language of the land.

    At the recent annual meeting, liberal appropriations were made for this kind of mission work, and it was decided to make the first and most determined onslaught here in Chicago.

    It may be remarked incidentally that this is not the branch of the Lutheran 3Church which is antagonistic to the American school system, or opposing the laws for compulsory school attendance. The United Church has put itself on record as being heartily in sympathy with American institutions, and it is this spirit which now is at work in the movement here described.

    Here in the city several missions have been established in the outlying districts, as for instance, at South Chicago, Englewood, Moreland, and three or four in the west and northwest divisions of the city.

    But for a work so extended, large funds are needed. Men can be furnished to do the work, but to provide suitable places of worship is not a small matter. Chapels which might be attractive and an ornament to their surroundings should be provided in order to insure the success of the movement. As an aid to this work, a committee of well-known Christian merchants from Iowa, Minnesota, and other states prominent in this Church, are now visiting Chicago, and will lay the matter before business men, especially wholesale merchants, with whom they 4have been accustomed to deal, in the hope that the work will commend itself to their judgment, and elicit their sympathy and aid. We think nothing could be more opportune or more worthy of generous support than this work, and we bespeak for it the kindly consideration of all men who have the moral elevation of all classes of citizens in our great metropolis at heart.

    Every legitimate effort for the Christian culture and Americanization of the young people of foreign extraction in our city should meet with the hearty support and encouragement of all good ...

    Norwegian
    III C, I A 1 a, I B 1
  • Skandinaven -- February 16, 1892
    Norwegians in Chicago (Editorial)

    It is not known when the first Norwegian arrived in Chicago, but we do know that there were a number of Norwegians here in 1850.

    Pastor Paul Anderson organized the first Norwegian Lutheran Church here, about 1850. There are only a few of the original settlers left, among whom is Mrs. Iver Larsen, whose son Victor Lawson, is the owner of the Daily News.

    John Anderson, the publisher of Scandinaven, came here about 1848; at that time Jens Olsen, Mrs. Andrew Nielsen, and Dr. Paoli were already settled here.

    John Anderson began to publish Scandinaven in 1865. Norden and Amerika 2were started in the seventies.

    The Norwegian settlers lived around Huron, May, Erie, Indiana and Superior streets. Milwaukee Avenue was their main street.

    The first bank in Chicago was started by a Norwegian, The Chicago State Bank; the president, H. A. Haugan, came to Chicago in 1859 and in 1879 he and Mr. Lindgren started the bank.

    Paul O. Stensland started the Milwaukee Avenue State Bank; he came to Chicago in 1871.

    It is not known when the first Norwegian arrived in Chicago, but we do know that there were a number of Norwegians here in 1850. Pastor Paul Anderson organized the ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II A 2, III A, III C, III G, IV
  • Skandinaven -- November 25, 1892
    Professor Boyesen on the Scandinavians (Editorial)

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor Boyesen is supposed to be thoroughly at home in this field, and it is needless to say that the picture he has drawn is in the main true to life. Yet we venture to assert that it fails to do justice either to the painter or the "paintee."

    That Mr. Boyesen should repeat and emphasize the stale slander about Scandinavians at home was a surprise as painful as it was unexpected. There is no excuse whatever for such a glaring misstatement of fact. Whatever may have been true, or not true, in the past of the Scandinavians in this respect, it certainly cannot be maintained that the Scandinavians of today are more addicted to drunkenness than are other peoples, or races, subject to similar conditions of life.

    2

    During the past generation the temperance reformer has found no more promising field than on the Scandinavian peninsula. Nowhere has he attained greater or more substantial results. Excepting the peninsulas of southern Europe there is no country in Europe where the consumption of intoxicating liquors per capita is less than in Norway. Sweden also made rapid and substantial progress in her war on the dram shop. The Danes, like their southern neighbors, are still a people of rather steady drinkers; yet it is a fact that there is comparatively little drunkenness in Denmark.

    The same is true of Scandinavians in this country. In the West and Northwest the most determined and aggressive regiments in the army of temperance warriors have been recruited from among the Scandinavian farmer population of that section. The present High License Law of Minnesota is their work, and they are the leaders in the recent movement for more rigid restrictions. It was the Norwegians who forced prohibition upon North Dakota. In South Dakota, in Iowa, in Nebraska, in Kansas, the Norwegians and Swedes--excepting those dealing in intoxicants--stand firm and united in support of restrictive legislation.

    3

    It is not necessary for the purpose in hand to search for the source of the current belief that the Scandinavians are a race of drunkards. Most of those who hold it are not to blame. They have been misinformed, and do not know any better. But certainly, it could not be otherwise than painfully surprising to find the falsehood repeated in a publication of the high standing of The North American Review over the signature of Professor Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen. Most of the readers of this excellent magazine naturally take it for granted that writers admitted to its pages know what they are talking about. Their statements are generally believed whether true or false. It is sincerely to be regretted that Mr. Boyesen should fail to make better use of his splendid opportunity to cut the roots from a current falsehood.

    Mr. Boyesen's picture of the Scandinavians in the West is rather unattractive. If it is true, he cannot be blamed for that. But we think the general verdict will be that it is incomplete and misleading. He exaggerates the mutual jealousy alleged to exist between the three Scandinavian Nationalities. In proof of this assertion it is sufficient to point to the outcome of the recent election in Minnesota. He is unjust to the Norwegian Lutheran clergy. There 4may be, and probably are, mossbacks among them as well as in all other walks of life; but it is true that as a class, the ministers of the Norwegian Lutheran Church are opposed to general and national education. Among the students in the colleges and universities of the West, the Scandinavian youth are well represented. Most of these Scandinavian boys and girls are farmers' sons and daughters, who, with their parents' consent, have gone "in search of strange gods," as it is their aim to prepare themselves for a successful business or professional career.

    No hostility to the public schools is found among Scandinavian Lutheran Churches, nor can it be said that they are endeavoring to establish a system of parochial schools, strictly speaking. On the contrary, it is well understood throughout the Northwest that Scandinavian protestantism is a strong and unyielding bulwark of the unsectarian common school system.

    Exception might be taken also to other statements made in Professor Boyesen's paper. But this will do for the present. It might be added that a portion of 5his article containing all the doubtful elements in his picture of "The Scandinavians in the United States" has caught the eye of the exchange editor; and he has already started upon a more or less extensive journey into the columns of the daily and weekly press. Thus disconnected and isolated, this part of the article is a libel upon the Scandinavians as well as upon the author. Professor Boyesen undoubtedly regrets this use of his article as much as we do.

    We have critized frankly Professor Boyesen's statements. But we have no desire to be unjust to him or anybody else. If we have misrepresented his position or views in any way, he is welcome to the use of our columns. We shall also be glad to stand corrected if it be shown that we are mistaken in our views, or have made incorrect statements of facts.

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 2, I B 3 b, I A 1 a, I B 1, III C, I B 4, V B