The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- May 22, 1872
    [Celebrate Liberty Day]

    The 17th of May, the Norwegian day of Liberty was celebrated by several Norwegian societies. The weather was as though made to order. "Nora-Lodge" celebrated in the Orpheus Hall; Norwegian Dramatic Lodge celebrated in Turner Hall; and the Norwegian Society in its own Hall.

    All members had invited non-members to participate in their celebration. In Nora Lodge had a special celebration. Norwegian ladies presented the Lodge with a beautiful banner. Mr. Jacob Johnson gave the banner to the Lodge and made a very nice speach in English. Mr. Hans Anderson thanked the ladies in behalf of the Lodge. In the Norwegian Dramatic Club a Norwegian play was presented "Tordenskjold in Dynekilen" which was well staged and later a dance was held which lasted until morning.

    The 17th of May, the Norwegian day of Liberty was celebrated by several Norwegian societies. The weather was as though made to order. "Nora-Lodge" celebrated in the Orpheus Hall; Norwegian ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, III B 2, II B 1 c 1
  • Chicago Times -- July 19, 1872
    Norway's National Day Chicago Descendants of Thor and O'din Celebrate the Event

    One of the local events yesterday was the celebration by our Norwegian residents, of the 1000th anniversary of their federation or union.

    The day was celebrated in a manner befitting the occasion. Thousandth anniversaries do not occur every day. They are scarce even in the all-embracing cycle of nature.

    The sturdy and jubilant Northmen and Northwomen, gathered about Norwegian Hall 170-188 North Peoria Street, and by eight o'clock the assemblage numbered about 2000.

    At 8:30 a procession was formed of the following participants: Northmen Singing Society; Carpenter Union No. 5; Workingsmens' Society; Sailors' Society, in uniform; ten carriages containing the chorus of young ladies dressed in white.

    2

    The attendance at Haas Park was estimated at about 5000 and the exercises at the park were of a varied and interesting character.

    The park was decorated with garlands and Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, and American flags. The musical part of the program was under the direction of Prof. Lindner. This was followed by the speeches delivered by Rev. Petersen, in Norwegian. Mr. Ingwell Olsen, in Norwegian. Dr. Julson followed in a short address on Norway's half sister, Denmark, and the chorus sang a Danish song.

    A grand ball, at Aurora Turner Hall on Milwaukee Avenue, was given under the auspices of the Harmonic Society.

    In the evening, besides the festivities at Aurora Hall, a select company under the guidance of E. T. Thorsen met at the Barnes House and partook of supper. Toasts and speeches also came in order and the festive occasion closed amid congratulations and the expression of the hope that all might again together celebrate another thousandth anniversary, if not in this, in the next world.

    One of the local events yesterday was the celebration by our Norwegian residents, of the 1000th anniversary of their federation or union. The day was celebrated in a manner befitting ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- July 24, 1872
    [Celebrate Anniversary]

    The Norwegians of Chicago celebrated the 1000 Anniversary of Norway at Haas Park. The Norwegians gathered in front of the Norwegian Hall. Then a Norwegian silk banner was brought in by the ladies of the colony and presented to the Norwegian Men's Singing Society of Chicago. Pastor Peterson gave the banner to the singers after which they walked to their place in the parade. The band leader, Mr. Lindther, gave the command to start the march. The parade was led by twenty police officers, under police sergeant Johnson's command. The band played the Norwegian national anthem. Next came a division of Norwegian sailors dressed as though attending a regatta and marching under the Norwegian flag. Next under the various Scandinavian flags came the Scandinavian turners in their white uniforms; after them came the Norwegian societies under their new silk flag. After them came the following: The Workmen's Society; Norwegian Men's Singing Society; a row of carriages carrying the speakers of the day, and 2fifty Norwegian ladies wearing the Norwegian national costume. At the R.R. station forty-three coaches waited and they were taken to the park, only one half mile from the city.

    The start of the festival was announced by three cannon shots. Pastor C.J.P. Peterson made the special speech and he was stopped several times by enthusiastic applause. He finished his speech with "Hurrah for Norway" and a telegram was sent to Norway. Nine cannon shots shocked the neighborhood.

    The Norwegians of Chicago celebrated the 1000 Anniversary of Norway at Haas Park. The Norwegians gathered in front of the Norwegian Hall. Then a Norwegian silk banner was brought in ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, III B 2
  • Skandinaven -- July 09, 1878
    [Celebrate Fourth of July]

    The Norwegians as good citizens, celebrated the 4th of July, at Chicago Avenue Park. The Norwegian Singing Society brought many people to the park. The Scandinavian Turners in uniform marched to the park early in the forenoon. The Workingmen's Union and other societies were all there, and several speakers were present. Everyone had a good time.

    The Norwegians as good citizens, celebrated the 4th of July, at Chicago Avenue Park. The Norwegian Singing Society brought many people to the park. The Scandinavian Turners in uniform marched ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 18, 1892
    [Celebrate Norway's Constitution]

    Three thousand Norwegians celebrated the eighty-eighth anniversary of the adoption of the constitution of Norway, yesterday at Kuhn's Park.

    Fritz Meyer delivered the address of welcome. Then followed B. Bjornson's old and popular song "Ja vi elsker dette landet" (Yes we love this land), sung by the entire crowd. A. O. Thorpe made the festival speech. B. T. Richolson, Coroner, H. L. Hertz, and Peter Svanoe, Vice-Consul for Sweden and Norway also spoke.

    After singing "The Star Spangled Banner" the program was brought to a close.

    The proceeds will be used to purchase an oil painting of Lief Erickson to be exhibited at the World's Fair.

    Three thousand Norwegians celebrated the eighty-eighth anniversary of the adoption of the constitution of Norway, yesterday at Kuhn's Park. Fritz Meyer delivered the address of welcome. Then followed B. Bjornson's ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, II C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- October 28, 1892
    Norwegians Celebrate

    The brilliant festival of last week in commemoration of Columbus did not prevent the Norwegians from paying tribute and honor to their own countryman, Leif Erikson, who discovered America, according to their claim, four hundred years before Columbus did. The Norwegians celebrated the occasion last night in the Scandia Hall. It was called the Festival of Grapes, in memory of the story that the discoverers after their return to the homeland in 1000 A.D. described the newly discovered country as a land abundant with grapes.

    The Normania Military Orchestra started the festivity off with a musical performance. Many more musical entertainments were rendered during the evening by the choir Kjerulf and several soloists. Mr. A.J.Elvis spoke in English, and Conradi in Norwegian. Than the original document about the discovery of America was read by Mr. Diserud. After the program refreshments were served consisting of grapes and other fruits; a lively ball finished the festive affair.

    The brilliant festival of last week in commemoration of Columbus did not prevent the Norwegians from paying tribute and honor to their own countryman, Leif Erikson, who discovered America, according ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 c 3, III B 3 a, I J
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 28, 1892
    Lief Eriksen's Day

    Columbus had the honor last week. Leif Eriksen had his turn last night at Scandia Hall at West Ohio Street near Milwaukee Avenue, where a large company of sons and daughters of the land of Vikings paid their tribute to the man whom they claim discovered America four-hundred years before Columbus set fort on San Salvador. Speech making, dancing, songs and instrumental music were the features of the Eriksen "Fest".

    Pretty little girls with red frocks and garlands in their hair gave away grapes to the guests out of big baskets to commemorate the discovery of Vineland the Beautiful. It was an evening that bore much significance from the Northland, for it meant nothing less than a claim on the part of the Norwegians to the honors for discovering America. It was no idle boast either, for the speakers of the evening backed up their claims with testimony from such eminent historians as Prof. John Fiske of Harvard University, Prof. Harsford, Prof. Bancroft, Prof. Gustav Storm, and Prof. Anderson, who concede that Lief Eriksen touched Americas shores 2long before Columbus was born. The Norwegians lay much stress on the statements of Prof. Harsford who believes so thoroughly in Eriksen that he has erected three monuments to his memory. One in Baltimore, one in Boston, and another near Boston. On the stage behind the speakers table was a painting of Eriksen, said to have been taken from sketches found among the archives of Iceland. The program was as follows:........The celebration was sponsored by L. E. Olsen and a committee;......Many prominent persons were present;.......Addresses and speeches were made by Mr. Elvig, and P. A. Conrodi;..........The adherents of Lief Eriksen continued their music and dancing at Scandia Hall until a late hour.

    The Norwegians of Chicago are planning to have a big celebration in honor of Eriksen during the World's Fair. They will dispute the claims of Columbus on his own grounds.

    May 17, is the Norwegian national holiday, and on that occasion next year the grand celebration will be held. An effort will be made to have the royal family 3of Norway in Chicago that day at least. A procession will parade the streets as an escort for the guests of honor. There will be floats representing Lief Eriksen in his ship and landing on American shores.

    The projectors of the celebration intend to make the demonstration compare as favorably as possible with the Columbian display. Prof. Harsford and other historians will be asked to prepare addresses.

    The Lief Eriksen Memorial Association is having a $3000.00 portrait of the famous Viking for exhibition at the Columbian Exposition.

    Columbus had the honor last week. Leif Eriksen had his turn last night at Scandia Hall at West Ohio Street near Milwaukee Avenue, where a large company of sons and ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 16, 1893
    [Celebrate Norwegian Independence Day]

    Tomorrow will be the first of the special days of the Exposition. The Norwegians of Chicago will gather to hear from eloquent lips the story of the independence of the sturdy Kingdom of the Northland.

    The celebration has a double meaning to all the subjects of King Oscar. It marks not only the practical completion of the Norwegian Building at Jackson Park, but is as well the annual day of rejoicing in commemoration of the separation of the kingdom from Denmark. Every year on May 17, there is a general holiday throughout Norway. So tomorrow these dwellers in an alien land will follow the custom of their country. The Norwegian societies of the city will meet at Scandia Hall on the West side. Commissioner General Ravn and his fellow Commissioners, representing the imperial government, will be there also, and, headed by bands which will play Norse airs, they will march to Jackson Park.

    2

    In Festival Hall the celebration will begin with the singing of the Norwegian national hymn, "Ja, vi elsker dette landet", "Yes,we love this land", the first line reads when translated into English. Every Norseman knows the song by heart, and its singing by 7000 patriotic voices should make such music as the wall of Festival Hall have not yet echoed.

    Some of the Norwegian singing societies will celebrate Independence day by a festival at Kuhn's Park.

    Tomorrow will be the first of the special days of the Exposition. The Norwegians of Chicago will gather to hear from eloquent lips the story of the independence of the ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a
  • Skandinaven -- March 19, 1894
    [To Celebrate Norwegian Day] (Summary)

    On May 17th the Leif Erickson Monument Society will celebrate the Norwegian day of independence at Kuhns Park. All Scandinavians are invited. The surplus is going to be used for the erection of a statue of Leif Erickson, first discoverer of America.

    On May 17th the Leif Erickson Monument Society will celebrate the Norwegian day of independence at Kuhns Park. All Scandinavians are invited. The surplus is going to be used for ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, II C
  • Skandinaven -- May 17, 1897
    Seventeenth of May

    This year, as usual, the Norwegians celebrated their Independence Day. This year's celebration was the most successful in years. More people attended than ever before. Many were the speeches delivered, and excellent ones, but the outstanding address which is herewith published was delivered by Attorney Fred Gade:

    Fellow Countrymen:

    "Patriotism, great and deep-seated, has been demonstrated here today. On a foreign shore, thousands of miles away from our beloved homeland, this patriotism asserts itself and finds expression in a celebration similar to those at home. We march in a procession with our national colors, as they do far away, there in Norway, where we ourselves, most of us as children, some even at a more advanced age marched with flag in hand to the honor and glory of the dear motherland and her day of rejoicing. Today we unite in mind and heart with our brothers at home--for home it still is and ever 2will be, however good citizens we may be here--and we sing the praises of that home in our national hymns and commemorate the day when there was given to her that bulwark of liberty and independence, the constitution of "Syttende Mai" (17th May).

    "Of what does this patriotism consist? Love of our country with its beauty, traditions and customs? Love of all that is dear to us from our childhood; our relatives, friends and other ties there at home? Yes, love certainly and something else beside, which perhaps after all is part of that love: gratitude, deepfelt and lasting, gratitude for all she was and still is to us every day of our life.

    "We are told we make good citizens in this country, that we are found to be an honest, industrious trustworthy people. It is said that we are the kind of immigrants this country wants and needs, and that we seem to bring with us from across the seas a knowledge of institutions and conditions of the freest kind, presumably similar to those existing here. It is said 3that we are an element for good and that we benefit the country by standing on the right side where principle is involved, above all, that we are law-abiding.

    "If this be true and if we are deserving of such commendation, if we are in truth law-abiding, it must be due to the conditions and institutions of our homeland where that quality which naturally obeys and respects the law was fostered in us. It must be because we are accustomed to a law that commands respect, and deserves obedience.

    "To learn the nature of a people one must look to their laws and institutions. The rules and regulations laid down by a people for its own conduct are a criterion of its sense of responsibility and honor, and in proportion to their justness, goodness, liberality, or the reverse, those laws advance or retard that people's growth, development and happiness. They cannot but affect the attitude, not only of the people as a whole, but in some degree of the individual towards every question met with in life.

    4

    "What laws has Norway? What is her constitution? It is a constitution that is freer and more just than any on earth. Some would object to this statement on the ground that Norway is not a republic, under the impression that a monarchial form of government implies curtailment of the people's power, that in fact the very word "king" means loss of the rights of the people. But is it so after all in Norway? Do we not know that the will of the people is asserted there in more prompt and telling manner than in this republic, and that our constitution retained as chief executive "king" because our traditions, abounding with the leadership of a king, so demanded it? Have not the Norwegian people repeatedly passed the measure they wished above the king's veto in accordance with their constitutional right to do so? Did not the democratic spirit of the Norwegian people bring about the abolition of titles against the expressed wish of King Carl Johan--nobility being the last remnant of class distinction repugnant to the spirit of the constitution?

    "And it is to the constitution to which we today pay honor and respect with a deep feeling of gratitude in our hearts not only for its sturdy care and 5protection of us at home, but also for its lasting benefit to us here, in training and adapting us to American citizenship.

    "God keep that constitution safe, and give to our people strength to preserve it intact and sacred!"

    This year, as usual, the Norwegians celebrated their Independence Day. This year's celebration was the most successful in years. More people attended than ever before. Many were the speeches delivered, ...

    Norwegian
    I C, III B 3 a, V A 2, III H, I E, IV