The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- January 03, 1872
    [Scandinavians in Chicago]

    The last census showed 14000 Scandinavians to be in Chicago, of whom 6,373 were Norwegians, 6,154 Swedes and 1,243 Danes. If we figure children and grandchildren it would make a total of 30,000. No wonder that there are so many Scandinavian lodges.

    The Norwegian Turner Lodge established August 14, 1867, 115 members; Nora-Lodge, I.R.H.K., founded May 17, 1863; Norwegian Dramatic Club, founded March 12, 1868, 10-15 members; Norwegian Men's Singing Society, founded October 30, 1870, sixteen active and twenty passive members. The Norwegian Band, founded July 1, 1870, ten uniform members and the Norwegian National Guard, founded September 30, 1870. Exercises and Uniforms as U.S.A. Army-Norwegian Progressive Club, the purpose is churchly and social functions.

    The last census showed 14000 Scandinavians to be in Chicago, of whom 6,373 were Norwegians, 6,154 Swedes and 1,243 Danes. If we figure children and grandchildren it would make a ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2, III A
  • Skandinaven -- May 22, 1872
    [Celebrate Liberty Day]

    The 17th of May, the Norwegian day of Liberty was celebrated by several Norwegian societies. The weather was as though made to order. "Nora-Lodge" celebrated in the Orpheus Hall; Norwegian Dramatic Lodge celebrated in Turner Hall; and the Norwegian Society in its own Hall.

    All members had invited non-members to participate in their celebration. In Nora Lodge had a special celebration. Norwegian ladies presented the Lodge with a beautiful banner. Mr. Jacob Johnson gave the banner to the Lodge and made a very nice speach in English. Mr. Hans Anderson thanked the ladies in behalf of the Lodge. In the Norwegian Dramatic Club a Norwegian play was presented "Tordenskjold in Dynekilen" which was well staged and later a dance was held which lasted until morning.

    The 17th of May, the Norwegian day of Liberty was celebrated by several Norwegian societies. The weather was as though made to order. "Nora-Lodge" celebrated in the Orpheus Hall; Norwegian ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, III B 2, II B 1 c 1
  • Skandinaven -- July 24, 1872
    [Celebrate Anniversary]

    The Norwegians of Chicago celebrated the 1000 Anniversary of Norway at Haas Park. The Norwegians gathered in front of the Norwegian Hall. Then a Norwegian silk banner was brought in by the ladies of the colony and presented to the Norwegian Men's Singing Society of Chicago. Pastor Peterson gave the banner to the singers after which they walked to their place in the parade. The band leader, Mr. Lindther, gave the command to start the march. The parade was led by twenty police officers, under police sergeant Johnson's command. The band played the Norwegian national anthem. Next came a division of Norwegian sailors dressed as though attending a regatta and marching under the Norwegian flag. Next under the various Scandinavian flags came the Scandinavian turners in their white uniforms; after them came the Norwegian societies under their new silk flag. After them came the following: The Workmen's Society; Norwegian Men's Singing Society; a row of carriages carrying the speakers of the day, and 2fifty Norwegian ladies wearing the Norwegian national costume. At the R.R. station forty-three coaches waited and they were taken to the park, only one half mile from the city.

    The start of the festival was announced by three cannon shots. Pastor C.J.P. Peterson made the special speech and he was stopped several times by enthusiastic applause. He finished his speech with "Hurrah for Norway" and a telegram was sent to Norway. Nine cannon shots shocked the neighborhood.

    The Norwegians of Chicago celebrated the 1000 Anniversary of Norway at Haas Park. The Norwegians gathered in front of the Norwegian Hall. Then a Norwegian silk banner was brought in ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, III B 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- April 27, 1881
    Scandinavian Emigration

    An adjourned meeting of the Scandinavian Emigrant Relief Society was held last evening in the Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Huron and Rucker Streets. The business was transacted in the Norwegian language, and consisted in the election of new members, making a present total of forty-four, and the discussion of a new charter. It was decided that the operations of the society would be extensive enough to require its incorporation. It was decided last night to employ an agent to carry out the objects of the society, which the constitution defines to be as follows:

    To assist Scandinavian emigrants by advice and counsel both during their stay in the city and at their departure; to meet them upon their arrival and furnish them with suitable stopping-places while they remain; to endeavor to protect them from imposition; and to furnish the destitute with the necessary assistance.

    2

    The funds for starting the work are being raised by a canvassing committee. It is intended that the society shall be in direct communication with the various steamship companies, and thus have reliable advices of the movement of Scandinavian emigrants.

    The chairman informed the Tribune reporter that during the period from January 1, to April 15, the number of Swedes who left the one port of Stockholm for America was about 25,000, against 11,000 for the same time last year. Norwegian ports are also sending out double the numbers of last year, and a dispatch from New York last night stated that contracts are completed to carry 60,000 emigrants from Norway to America.

    The names of the officers, who also constitute the Board of Directors, are as follows: O. L. Strangeland, president; L. Thoen, Andrew Moberg, L. Skielvig, vice-presidents; O. Rosler, corresponding-secretary; Henry Schreil, recording-secretary; A. Nelson, Treasurer.

    An adjourned meeting of the Scandinavian Emigrant Relief Society was held last evening in the Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Huron and Rucker Streets. The business was transacted in the Norwegian language, ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2, II D 1
  • Skandinaven -- January 25, 1889
    Ole G. Gudmundson

    In answer to an article in your paper, written by Ole G. Gudmundson, in which the said Mr. Gudmundson attacks the veracity of our presiding officer Ivan Schley in an interview with the reporter of your paper, the members of the St. Julian Lodge #92, passed the following resolutions for publication during their convention on January 23:

    Be it known that Ole G. Gudmundson, after an impartial trial for charges preferred against him, was unanimously suspended for a term of twenty-five years.

    Be it further known that brother Ivan Schley had nothing whatever to do with the matter, in his official capacity as presiding officer of the lodge:

    The members of this lodge further wish to state that it is an outrage that 2this man, Gudmundson, who claims to be a lawyer, assailed the veracity and character of brother Ivan Schley who had nothing whatever to do with the suspension of Ole G. Gudmundson.

    St. Julian Lodge #92.

    W. C. T. Nelson, Secretary.

    In answer to an article in your paper, written by Ole G. Gudmundson, in which the said Mr. Gudmundson attacks the veracity of our presiding officer Ivan Schley in an ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2, I F 6, IV
  • Skandinaven -- August 01, 1890
    Scandia Hall

    The cornerstone of Scandia Hall will be laid August 3. This will be the largest building enterprise yet attempted by the Scandinavians.

    The cornerstone of Scandia Hall will be laid August 3. This will be the largest building enterprise yet attempted by the Scandinavians.

    Norwegian
    II F, III B 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 11, 1890
    Scandinavian Bricklayer's Club

    The picnic held at Belmont Park yesterday afternoon under the auspices of the Scandinavian Bricklayers' Club was one of the most enjoyable of the season. Indeed it seemed more like a family reunion than a public picnic, so sociable were all present. It was the second annual picnic given by the club, which was organized Feb. 3, 1889, for the mutual benefit of its members, none but union bricklayers can belong to the club. It now has about 150 members. Each member is paid $5.00 a week during sickness or disability, and about $450.00 was paid out for sick benefits last winter. The officers of the club are: Ed. Sundling, President; Andrew Lind, Secretary; Andrew Pearson, Financial Secretary; and John Stone, Treasurer.

    The attendance at the picnic was large. There was excellent music by a band of Scandinavian musicians, and dancing was indulged in by young and old.

    The picnic held at Belmont Park yesterday afternoon under the auspices of the Scandinavian Bricklayers' Club was one of the most enjoyable of the season. Indeed it seemed more like ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2
  • Skandinaven -- October 26, 1890
    The Scandinavian Workers' Society

    The Scandinavian Workers' Society was organized June 13, 1870. A few of the old timers are still with us, among the most active ones we have are: John Hafsten, (Norwegian), H. S. Mathisen (Dane), and M. Handerup (Dane), one of the organizers of Dania. The history of the society is very interesting, and we will give a few of the highlights.

    The first meeting place was on the corner of Desplaines Street and Milwaukee Avenue, which was, at that time, a residential neighborhood. At the time of organization, there were only about ten or fifteen members, but the following winter they numbered three hundred fifty.

    In 1871, the following well-known men became very active: Fritz Frantzen (Dane), Hoffman Smith (Dane), Moller and Lundin. Then, after a successful period, came the Chicago fire, which destroyed everything they owned.

    2

    In the Fall of 1872, they bought an old church on the corner of Desplaines Avenue and Randolph Street. The church later was moved to the property the society owned on Halsted and Richlieu Streets. The membership, during the time after the fire, dropped from three hundred fifty to sixteen, and in 1873-1874, this membership dropped to seven, so they moved in the Dania Hall.

    This seemed to help. It was a better location, as the neighborhood around Peoria Street and Milwaukee Avenue had not suffered so much from the fire.

    In 1881, the society sold its building, and rented the Aurora Turner hall. Here they stayed until 1883. Now they again had over three hundred members, and they kept on growing. In 1881, two prominent people joined. They were Martin Fjeld (Norwegian), and P. Nielsen (Dane). These two people helped build the society to what it is today.

    Late in 1883, the society moved to larger quarters, The Norwegian Singing Societies' hall, and in 1884, they moved to still larger quarters in Concordia Hall.

    3

    In 1888, the organization became so large that it was necessary to divide it into eight branches, as follows:

    1. Concordia; 2. Skandia, at Morland; 3. Humboldt, at Humboldt Park; 4. Crown, at Lake View; 5. Maplewood, at Maplewood; 6. John Ericksen; 7. Phoenix, at Englewood; 8. Eau Clair, in Wisconsin. The total membership now is eleven hundred, of which seven hundred thirty belong to Lodge No. 1, Concordia. The total assets are $62,000.

    Following are the names of the men who built the organization to what it is today, they all held office in the years given:

    John Nielsen (Dane) 1876; A. Midling (Norwegian) 1877; John Nielsen, 2nd term, 1878; H. S. Mathisen (Dane) 1879; Ole Bendixen (Dane) 1880; John Hafsten (Norwegian) 1881-1882; H. Gorder (Norwegian) 1882; Svend Olsen (Dane) 1883-1884; M. Julsrud (Norwegian) 1885; O. Thorud (Norwegian) 1886-1887; J. Thorwold (Norwegian) 1887; M. Fjeld (Norwegian) 1888-1889; John Olsen (Dane) 1890.

    4

    We think this is an excellent piece of work and grand results to show after twenty years.

    The Scandinavian Workers' Society was organized June 13, 1870. A few of the old timers are still with us, among the most active ones we have are: John Hafsten, (Norwegian), ...

    Norwegian
    II D 1, III B 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- October 31, 1890
    Music and Patriotism Thirtieth Anniversary of the Organization Celebrated with Stirring Songs and Loyal Speeches

    The Norwegian Singing Society of Chicago was organized Oct. 30th 1870, with sixteen charter members. Since then the society has flourished..., last night seventy active and upwards of three hundred contributing members sat down to an elegant and bounteous anniversary banquet in Baer's Hall, Milwaukee and Chicago avenues. Before the banquet several stirring songs were sung and Dr. A. Doe spoke in Scandinavian giving a brief history of the society, which is the oldest, the wealthiest, and largest of its kind in the United States. The members (were accompanied by their families. During the evening an address in the English language was delivered by Olaf Ray, who spoke of the educational requirements of his mother country and said that all Scandinavians who have come to America are emphatically in favor of compulsory education. He believed that the great majority of his fellow-countrymen are good citizens and are unswerving in their allegiance to the Stars and Stripes. They have no respect for mitre an crown, and are willing at any time to respond to the call of their adopted country to assist in defending the liberty which has made America the proudest of Nations.

    2

    A number of the original charter members were present among them being Dr. Bernard Olsen, the first president of the Society.

    The Norwegian Singing Society of Chicago was organized Oct. 30th 1870, with sixteen charter members. Since then the society has flourished..., last night seventy active and upwards of three hundred ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2
  • Chicago Tribune -- August 10, 1891
    United Turners Picnic

    The Norwegian Turners of Chicago and Pullman and the German Turners of Pullman held their annual picnic at Savdener's Park yesterday. This was the first time the German and Norwegian Turners have united to hold a gala day. About sixty Turners of Chicago left the train at Pullman, where they were joined by the Pullman delegation and the procession marched to the park.

    The procession numbered about 125 members of the society and 200 friends. Notwithstanding the intolerable weather a gay time was experienced when the delegation arrived at the ground, a crowd of probably 1000 people had assembled and were scattered beneath the trees. The day was too warm for dancing although splendid music was furnished by the Scandinavian Musical Society. After lunch some races were on the program, but few participated.

    A children's race of fifty yards was run and won by Charley Robinson, who was awarded an autograph album. John Duffey took first prize in the 100-yard dash and 2received a box of cigars. D. Erikson won the second prize, a cigar holder. No more contests were held although there were prizes offered and the managers made attempts to get starters, but the broiling sun shriveled all the ambition of the athletically inclined. An excellent drill was given by sixteen young ladies who compose the Norwegian Drill Corps. They executed difficult maneuvers with great skill and their efforts were loudly applauded.

    Another interesting feature of the day was the horizontal bar performances of Frighof Anderson, Anbert Anderson and O. Schulsig. Frighof Anderson is a man of wide reputation as an acrobat and won round after round of applause from the large audience.

    The festivities of the day were somewhat dampened by the heavy rain that came about 4:00 o'clock. When the time arrived to go to the train a numb bedraggled caravan started on its way across the fields to the station. Bangs that in the early morning curled gracefully above the eyes of the fair sex, felt damp and 3straight over their foreheads and white dresses were spattered with mud and water so that their former beauty was a thing of the past.

    Among the prominent members of the order were present were Ch.........

    President of the Chicago Turners, R. Eck, A. Stahl and Charles A. Smith, Captain. The management were well pleased with the success of the days outing although a much larger attendance was expected. The receipts of the picnic will be devoted to the general expenses of the society.

    The Norwegian Turners of Chicago and Pullman and the German Turners of Pullman held their annual picnic at Savdener's Park yesterday. This was the first time the German and Norwegian ...

    Norwegian
    III B 2, I C