The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

Filter by Date

  • Die Fackel -- May 20, 1883
    [Mass Meeting]

    The Mass Meeting was held by the Scandinavian Socialists at 742 West North Avenue, at which Peter Peterson was chairman and comrades Schilling, Parsons and a Danish party comrade who were speakers.

    The following resolutions were accepted: In consideration that the terrible murderer called the English Government, is or will ask the extradition of two freedom loving persons, whose only crime is the accomplishment of the emancipation of the Irish people against oppression and despotism and considering that it would be committing treason against the Declaration of Independence to extradite Walsh and Sheridan for the British Government - it was resolved that we will oppose and fight this extradition with all means at our disposal. We call, therefore, on our good citizens to give us their support to save this country from such shame.

    The Mass Meeting was held by the Scandinavian Socialists at 742 West North Avenue, at which Peter Peterson was chairman and comrades Schilling, Parsons and a Danish party comrade who ...

    Norwegian
    III B 1, I F 2, I E, III B 1, III B 1
  • Skandinaven -- October 03, 1890
    A Word to the Republican Politicians

    Any one who is acquainted with the Scandinavians of the West will know that in every State they have uniformly been found almost solidly massed in the Republican ranks at every election. The exceptions are so few as to prove the rule only. This is a fact of which we are proud, and for which the Skandinaven makes bold to take its share of credit. We also assert that the Scandinavians are Republicans from principle and not for office or boodle. Nor do they believe that the consideration of nationality should play any important part in politics where all are citizens of a common country, equally sharing its privileges and amenable to its laws. But the leading politicians themselves have studiously cultivated this feeling of nationality by appealing to it, and holding out inducements before elections which often have been forgotten or ignored afterwards. In this way, the nationality consideration has been dragged into our politics and must henceforth be taken into account with some care. For broken promises have produced an irritation in some quarters which, if continued, threaten to obscure the consideration of party principles, and raise the question of nationality to a dangerous place, or at least of an undue importance.

    2

    In Michigan, the Scandinavians have not been numerous enough to attain any large share in the management of public affairs, but still strong enough to be duly appreciated when votes are desired, and of considerable importance when Republican majorities are counted. For the reason above stated, we regret that we must record the fact that the Democratic party in Michigan has outstripped the Republicans in offering a prominent place on the State ticket to a Scandinavian. Democratic shrewdness may by this method reap the fruits of the seed sown by unwise and faithless Republicans.

    We regret also to say that we think it is about time this lesson was administered not only in Michigan, but also in Minnesota and Illinois.

    The Democrats have not only chosen a Scandinavian, but a man with both business and personal qualifications, which make him eminently qualified for the position, and fully the equal, if not the superior, of his opponent on the Republican ticket. Even with no grudge from past disappointments, the Scandinavian voters might well be pardoned, if pride 3and satisfaction in the recognition of a worthy countryman should lead them to cast their votes for him without regard to party allegience, especially in an election where national issues are understood to be less prominently involved.

    To insure that the Republican leaders of Michigan more fully comprehend what we mean, and to give them an insight into to the feelings which prevail in some places among the Scandinavians, we will give the substance of a communication from a creditable source, and which is only one of several of the same nature, detailing circumstances and actions which can hardly fail to allienate a large number of voters from the party in the approaching election.

    The communication referred to is from northern Michigan, and is in substance as follows: "In the election of 1888, the Scandinavians were, as usual, faithful to the Republican party. With our gray hats on, we marched in a procession night after night, and shouted ourselves hoarse for 'Harrison and protection,' while the bread-and-butter politicians and office seekers 4stood on the street corners, rubbing their hands in glee, and encouraged us with such friendly expressions as 'that's right boys!'-'the Scandinavians are in line'--'faithful as ever,' etc. The result of the election is well known. We were then told that nothing was too good for the Scandinavians. The fruits of victory were to be distributed, and in the council of the party it was determined that the deputy collectorship should fall to Ishpeming, and of course, a Scandinavian would get this 'plum'. We, therefore, were determined to present the name of Andrew Sandberg, a Swede. He is in every way an honorable and competent man. When Mr. Stone of Detroit had been appointed collector, Mr. Sandberg went to work and got the recommendations and endorsements of the prominent Republicans of the district and forwarded his application to the proper authority. He was so sure of the appointment that he already began to look for suitable office accommodation, forgetting in his ignorance the old adage that"it is imprudent to sell the skin until you have shot the bear." Mr. Sandberg soon received word from the collector that he wished to see him in Detroit. On his arrival there, Mr. Sandberg was shown letters from some of the very persons who had recommended him and indorsed his application, but who now 5opposed his appointment, giving as a reason the fact that the Scandinavians were such faithful Republicans that they needed no such encouragement.

    "The office was consequently given to another nationality whose fickleness had made it necessary to strenghten their Republicanism by substantial recognition. But to show that gratitude was not a feeling entirely foreign to the Republican breast, Mr. Sandberg was graciously offered an inferior clerkship in the office he sought with the magnificent salary of $500."

    (Continued next issue).

    6

    We shall not pursue this unpleasant theme farther. Much might be said on all sides of it and all around it. We have reason to believe that the above account is substantially correct. And we may add that occurrences very similar are not unknown here in Illinois and other States than in Michigan. We will say in conclusion that while the leading politicians, themselves, are largely responsible for bringing the consideration of nationality into politics, they should also be held strictly accountable for the results of their ill-advised policy. We should regret to see the Republican party defeated in Michigan, or in Illinois, and most of all do we regret to see that end accomplished by a defection of the Scandinavians, but we are by no means disposed to find fault with the voter whose pride in nationality might lead him to resent the slight put upon him by the perfidy of political machinists. We rather think such a lesson would be wholesome discipline, and an element in our political education quite suited to the 7times. And it would do the Republican party substantial good if the leading politicians in every State in the Union would give some careful thought to these matters.

    Any one who is acquainted with the Scandinavians of the West will know that in every State they have uniformly been found almost solidly massed in the Republican ranks at ...

    Norwegian
    I F 6, III B 1, I F 4, I C
  • Skandinaven -- December 12, 1892
    Better Country Roads (Editorial)

    If it wishes to accomplish Something of substantial benefit to the country, which will entitle it to the everlasting gratitude of its constituents, the present Congress should make some suitable provision for the improvement of our country roads--the only highways which are still left to the people. The first session was barren of results, and little is to be expected from the second and last. Both parties apparently are determined to pursue the safe policy doing nothing both preferring to play a waiting game.

    This interval of political inaction, which must needs prove more or less tedious and tiresome to most of the members, offers a splendid opportunity for a thorough and favorable consideration of the question of better roads. No politics are involved in this. It is a matter which may be decided exclusively upon its merits without the slightest regard to party lines.

    2

    The people are aroused to the importance of good roads and demand that something be done along these lines without further delay. It is a matter requiring the co-operation of state and federal authorities, if the good roads movement is to be carried forward vigorously and successfully, and on broad national lines, as it should be. Consequently it is a question of which Congress should take hold with a strong, determined hand. Let the present Congress do so, and it will have done something which will be remembered with gratitude when its many and grave sins are forgotten. The session could not be devoted to a better cause nor [could the time be] more profitably invested.

    The energies and attention of the nation have been so engrossed in the task of gridironing the continent with railroad tracks, that the question of country roads has been entirely lost sight of. The means of communication between neighbors and between neighborhoods have been completely overshadowed by the great railroad enterprises enlisting millions upon millions of capital and offering an almost boundless field for speculation and gain. During the heated discussion of the problem of railroad rates, the condition of our 3country roads as an element in the cost of transportation has received only slight attention. This was natural; but the conditions now are changed. The development of the country has now reached a stage where the importance of the common roads is no longer obscured or denied. In many localities the matter of transportation has become simply a question of better roads. The time for action has come. The matter has been thoroughly discussed in the press, thanks to Albert A. Pope of Boston and other zealous champions of a civilized road policy. If Congress leads the way, the states will follow in its wage. Then let it lead.

    If it wishes to accomplish Something of substantial benefit to the country, which will entitle it to the everlasting gratitude of its constituents, the present Congress should make some suitable ...

    Norwegian
    III B 1
  • Skandinaven -- February 25, 1894
    [The New Federal Building]

    Skandinaven demands that the interest of the west side be dully considered in the matter of selecting the site of the new post office. It insists upon nothing which is not fair to all parties deserving consideration. The question of the location of the new Federal building should be decided on broad grounds. The prosperity of the whole community, and the present and future needs of the city should determine the choice of the site. A Federal building in a city the size of Chicago is not an ephermeral structure. It is supposed to last for generations and to satisfy the needs of the city for some decades at least.

    If it should be located on the lake front it would be comparatively little use to the majority of the people. Within ten years the need of a more centrally located post office would be apparent, whereas the location suggested by the Skandinaven will serve the best interests of all concerned, not for a day, or for a few years, but for all time, if we may judge the future in the light of recent developments.

    Skandinaven demands that the interest of the west side be dully considered in the matter of selecting the site of the new post office. It insists upon nothing which is ...

    Norwegian
    III B 1, III A
  • Skandinaven -- July 09, 1896
    Their Responsibility (Editorial in English)

    If the Populists are willing to lay aside temporarily those principles which differentiate the Democratic and the Populist parties, they will claim a share in the responsibility for whatever may happen if Mr. Bryan should be elected. Whether they desire it or not, the work of the next administration would be accredited to the two elements in common. Populists and silver Democrats alike would come out of the situation four years hence, hand in hand as the administration party, and as such they might be inclined to stand together in the subsequent campaign. The amalgamating effect of four years of joint control in the White House and Congress would be very great.

    It all depends. The probability is that "four years of Bryan" would result even more disastrously than "four more years of Grover", and that Democrats and Populists 2would vie with each other in disclaiming "a share of the responsibility".

    As everybody knows, the Wilson-Gorman law is the one great feat of the present administration. The Democrats and the Populists are jointly responsible for the law. But for the support of Populist Senators it could not have been enacted. However, it does not appear that the Populists are anxious to claim credit for their share in this un-American piece of legislation; on the contrary, their angry denunciations of the law are heard throughout the land.

    The Republicans of the House presented to the Democratic-Populist silver majority of the Senate a bill for an increase of revenue. It was a necessary measure, which, if adopted, would have put the treasury upon a sound footing and prevented more bond issues. But the Democrats and Populists wanted none of it, though the proposed law was to be only a temporary enactment.

    The treasury keeps on running behind and the gold reserve keeps on going down, as everyone, including silver Democrats and Populists, knew they would. But 3it does not appear that either "element"is jealous of its share in the responsibility for the continued deficit or the prospective bond issue.

    Our Scandinavian voters should bear this in mind, and cast their votes accordingly.

    If the Populists are willing to lay aside temporarily those principles which differentiate the Democratic and the Populist parties, they will claim a share in the responsibility for whatever may ...

    Norwegian
    III B 1
  • Skandinaven -- August 09, 1896
    A National Issue (Editorial in English)

    The Skandinaven has received a number of inquiries from voters concerning the relations of Henry C. Payne to the Republican National Committee and the conduct of the present national campaign. One correspondent is under the impression that Mr. Payne was not re-elected to succeed himself on the Committee, while the majority want to know whether he has been placed in charge of the headquarters here in Chicago, the vigorous protest of labor to the contrary notwithstanding.

    In reply to the first question it may be stated that Mr. Payne was re-elected to succeed himself as committeeman--in defiance of the clearly and emphatically expressed will of the people. Mr. Payne was one of the four candidates of the Sawyer-Spooner-Payne combine for delegates-at-large, and it was well understood among the Republicans of the State that he is anxious to remain on the Committee.

    2

    But he suffered a crushing defeat in his own home [district], and among all the delegates in the State convention not one could be found who dared to whisper that the repudiated leader be sent as a delegate to St. Louis. John C. Spooner did not lift a finger to save his associate in the receiver business, and--what is still more significant--not even Sawyer, who never was suspected of being fainthearted, had the courage to intervene in the behalf of his faithful lieutenant. The work of the convention was generally approved throughout the State, especially the shelving of Payne.

    But Mr. Payne is a past master at the art of circumventing the will of the people, and snatched at re-election from the delegation in St. Louis. It was pointed out by those members of the delegation who kept faith with the people that his long service as a paid lobbyist for corporations had aroused the wrath of the farmers and workers and that his re-election would be a copious source of weakness to the party. But the thumbscrews were put on by the machine, and Mr. Payne secured another lease to power.

    So much for his continued membership on the Committee.

    3

    The Skandinaven is unable to define the exact nature of Mr. Payne's relations to the national Republican headquarters in Chicago. It is reported at this time that he had been chosen as chairman of the Western headquarters. The labor organizations at once registered protest. Subsequently, rumor had it that his frail health would not permit him to take any active part in the work of the campaign. As regards the charges preferred against him by the workers it is said that he has been exonerated from blame by certain labor leaders in Chicago. But it is asserted by spokesmen of labor that this exoneration was a bare fraud.

    Mr. Hanna and his associates on the National Committee will make a very serious mistake if they disregard the objections to Mr. Payne. There is no reason whatever why his services should be retained at the risk of alienating the farmers and workers. His alleged political generalship is largely a myth, except, perhaps, in his own belief. The battles he has won, a dunce could not have lost, while the reverses the Republicans have suffered in his State are attributable in no small measure to his efforts toward subverting the 4interests of the party to those of the corporations. As a matter of fact, his political spurs have been won mainly on the battlefield of the lobbyist and the buttonholer, in the service of great corporate interests in their efforts to trench upon the rights of the people. As a corporate employer of labor he has incurred the ill will of his employees to an extent that is almost unparalleled. As a lobbyist in the service of Armour he has done his utmost to block legislation designed to protect the farmers against unjust and ruinous competition of bogus butter and cheese. Every dairyman is thoroughly familiar with his record in this respect.

    These are plain facts which cannot be refuted or obscured. It is difficult to conceive why a man so obnoxious to large bodies of voters, should be entrusted with the management of the Republican campaign here in the West. McKinley is popular. Farmers and workers alike admire his sterling qualities, believe in the wisdom of the principles which he represents, and trust his leadership. But Sinbads have broken strong backs before and may do so again. No party can afford to load itself with barnacles, if it desires to retain 5the confidence and love of the people. Mr. Payne may be a gentleman of many qualities; but his character as a private citizen is not in question. What this paper desires to emphasize is that it would be extremely unwise to place Mr. Payne in a conspicuous and responsible position during the present campaign. He would cost the party thousands of votes, where it may need every vote it can possibly get.

    Let your voices be heard; protest, there is still time.

    The Skandinaven has received a number of inquiries from voters concerning the relations of Henry C. Payne to the Republican National Committee and the conduct of the present national campaign. ...

    Norwegian
    I F 6, III B 1
  • Skandinaven -- August 16, 1896
    Socialists and Silver (Editorial)

    One of the Republican spellbinders is in the habit of stigmatizing the fifty-cent dollar as the "socialist dollar." The term is improper and foolish. People in this country have as much right to be Socialists as they have to be Republicans or Democrats. "Socialists" and "socialistic" are no longer used as epithets or as terms of opprobrium except by people who are devoid alike of culture, common sense, and good breeding. As a matter of fact, the Republican platform is somewhat tainted with socialistic notions. Nor is the Democratic platform, despite its strong anarchistic coloring, entirely free from socialism.

    The expression is foolish because the Socialist party does not believe in free silver. Far from supporting the Bryan ticket, it has a Presidential ticket of its own in the field, and has condemned the sixteen-to-one fallacy in strong and emphatic language. The Socialists may be mistaken 2in some of their views. But many able men are found in their ranks. Nor can it be denied that they are sincere in their efforts to better the condition of the workers. But they do not believe in free silver because they know that free silver will rob the worker of part of his wages and cripple his power to support his family and educate his children. Spell-binders had better be careful.

    We know that the Scandinavians are not easily fooled, but they should think twice before they vote for any kind of legislation that may be opposed to the best interests of the majority.

    One of the Republican spellbinders is in the habit of stigmatizing the fifty-cent dollar as the "socialist dollar." The term is improper and foolish. People in this country have as ...

    Norwegian
    I E, III B 1, I C
  • Skandinaven -- January 21, 1897
    Victory

    Because of the defeat of Madden and Lorimer, we were able to elect the better man. The Scandinavian voters are very much satisfied with the outcome.

    W. E. Mason's election as John Palmer's successor will be received with general satisfaction throughout the state among republicans and the people at large. His was a victory well deserved and worthily won although his supporters should give due credit to the Cook County machine, which by overreaching itself made its own defeat inevitable and thus paved the way for Mason's election.

    The Skandinaven believes that Mr. Mason will discharge the duties of his high office creditably in every respect. We is brainy, able, eloquent and cultured, and his hands are clean. His reputation for wit, a gift which in the minds of some well-meaning people is prejudicial to dignity, will probably not materially detract from his usefulness as a senator. He is a man of good common sense, and will bottle up his wit if a proper regard for the traditions of the toga 2requires it. However, the people may rest assured that Mr. Mason will make a good senator and a useful servant of the state, even if he should be so mischievous as to venture to relieve to some extent the monotony and general dullness of senatorial debate.

    Our readers can be sure that this paper will lead in the future as we have in the past. We fight for the man and what he stands for.

    Because of the defeat of Madden and Lorimer, we were able to elect the better man. The Scandinavian voters are very much satisfied with the outcome. W. E. Mason's election ...

    Norwegian
    III B 1, II B 2 d 1, I F 6
  • Skandinaven -- January 26, 1899
    Let the People Speak (Editorial in English)

    The obstructionists in Washington have been unmasked. Their frothy declamations about the Declaration of Independence, their concern for the Constitution, their solicitude for the liberties of the Filipinos, their dreary wailings and evil prophecies, are only varying shades of a cloak of stupendous hypocrisy.

    How long is this farce to go on? Is the honor of the nation to be sacrificed in order to cover up the desperate condition of a bankrupt party? Is the United States of America to be held up by a low, cunning politician? Are buffoons and renegades to control the destinies of this country?

    In all the long-winded speeches that have been made against the peace treaty in the Senate, not one syllable can be found that has any bearing whatever upon the ratification of the treaty. That is a question, not of expansion 2or anti-expansion, but of national honor or dishonor, of peace or war.

    We are still at war with Spain, and every day that ratification of the treaty is delayed by obstruction postpones, unnecessarily, the restoration of peace. The fortunes of war and the treaty have imposed upon us certain duties to Spain, the Filipinos, and other countries--duties which we are in honor bound to fulfill. But sacred obligations and the honor of the country are ruthlessly cast to the winds by Gorman and his followers. The difficulties that have arisen in the Philippines are the legitimate fruits of their responsible obstruction; but they are proud of their achievements, proud of their success in tarnishing our matchless victories, and of exposing the country to perils and the American name to ridicule and contempt.

    The American people are proverbially long-suffering; but there is a limit to their patience. The limit has been reached, and they should speak in tones that will drive the bushwhackers into their holes. Legislatures that have not spoken should forthwith demand the instant ratification of the treaty, 3and constituents of Senators who glory in their shame should flood them with dispatches and letters commanding them to abandon their irrelevant obstruction and vote for the treaty.

    The obstructionists in Washington have been unmasked. Their frothy declamations about the Declaration of Independence, their concern for the Constitution, their solicitude for the liberties of the Filipinos, their dreary ...

    Norwegian
    I G, III B 1
  • Skandinaven -- November 24, 1899
    [Criticism of the Editorial "Lutherans and Expansion"] 1. Reverend Haas

    "I can only reply that in my sermon I uttered no opinion on political expansion, that I did not mean to utter such and opinion, and that the council no doubt did not understand me to utter such an opinion.

    "The commonwealth in which expansion is a fundamental law is defined in the next sentence: The Kingdom of God. This should be, and is, clear enough to any impartial, half-way intelligent reader, except perhaps to reporters of a political paper, for they are phenomenally obtuse on all matters concerning the church and the Kingdom of God. I preached the gospel, not politics.

    "Yours in Christ,

    George C. Haas."

    2

    [Translator's note: Reverend Haas was the preacher whose sermon the Skandinaven criticized in the editorial, "Lutherans and Expansion".]

    2. The General Council Says Nothing

    "The general council [of the Lutheran Church] has not, so far as I know, expressed itself either pro or con regarding the expansion policy of our government.

    "M. C. Ranseen President of the General Council."

    [The general council was accused of making certain statements, at their last meeting, on expansion.]

    3. Reverend Haas' Sermon

    3

    The Skandinaven reprints the part of Reverend Haas' sermon that caused the misunderstanding:

    "Whether it is in accord with the principles laid down in its Constitution and expedient unto the welfare of the country that this nation should be extending its domain over far distant lands and bringing under its sway a strange people, is a question now agitating the minds of many. But whatever be the position we take with reference to the policy of the land of our nativity or our adoption in the matter of expansion, we are by these facts reminded that we are citizens of a commonwealth in which expansion is a fundamental law, and the carrying out of the injunction, 'Make ye disciples of all nations,' a prime duty of every citizen. The Kingdom of God on earth, His holy church, is growing and will continue to grow, conquering nation after nation and extending its beneficent sway to the most distant climes. Unto Israel of old the evangelical prophet bore the message, 'Enlarge the place of thy tent,' and what was then enjoined in prophecy was fulfilled in fact with 4the advent of the Lord, the establishment of the new convenant and birth of the spiritual Israel that embraced all nations and tongues."

    4. Skandinaven's Criticism

    The Skandinaven was impressed by the foregoing part of the sermon as follows:

    "Reverend Haas emphasizes, clearly and tersely, the dominant phases of the question; he treats expansion as a fundamental law of the land and of Christian civilization. The prophetic injunction, 'Enlarge the place of thy tent,' expresses the divine policy for the propagation of the gospel of salvation upon earth; and it likewise voices the law of national growth and the spread of human civilization.

    "The American people, buoyant with strength and vitality and mindful of their mission, have neglected no opportunity to fulfill the God-given command. 'Enlarge the place of thy tent' has been the guiding and the controlling principle 5of American policy from the dawn even unto the dusk of the present century. Surely, expansion is a fundamental law of the land whether applied to our recent acquisitions or not, as expansion is, and must be, the fundamental law of our Christian-American civilization. For the only alternatives are stagnation, retrogression, and death."

    Reverend Haas states that he did not want to give the impression that he and the Lutheran Church were for expansion. But he did give that impression. He does not deny that the editorial is correct.

    The readers will remember his statement on expansion--political expansion, especially in reference to the Philippines. He then states that "no matter what stand we take in reference to expansion,....we are by these facts reminded that we are citizens of a commonwealth (republic) in which expansion is a fundamental law and the carrying out...."

    Reverend Haas must remember that expansion rests on the fundamental law;

    6

    Hawaii, Porto Rico, and the Philippines were acquired on certain tracts that are fundamental law. The Reverend's expression is one thing, and his explanation is not necessary. The people of a commonwealth elects its own officers. The citizens of God's Kingdom do not elect their leader. The expressions, as they were made by a preacher, fit a republic, but are absolutely not appropriate to God's Kingdom; the Kingdom of God cannot be compared to a republic.

    The Skandinaven does not feel that it needs to apologize. We have history on our side of the discussion. Expansion has, through the ages, been necessary in order to spread Christianity. Expansion is the fundamental law of the land, of Christianity, and of the entire Christian civilization.

    The president of the general council informs us that the council has made no statement regarding this matter. This statement was unnecessary; we have never claimed this.

    "I can only reply that in my sermon I uttered no opinion on political expansion, that I did not mean to utter such and opinion, and that the council no ...

    Norwegian
    III C, III B 1, I J