The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Skandinaven -- April 22, 1879
    The Leif Ericson Fund (Editorial)

    To our forefathers belong undeniably the honor of being the first white men ever to tread upon American soil. We have authoritative historical data evidencing their early arrival on this continent, while reports of still earlier discoveries of this hemisphere are vague and uncertain and shrouded in mythological fog.

    In a couple of decades it will be nine hundred years since this great discovery took place, and it is now proposed to erect a monument in memory of this historical event, near the coast where Leif Erikson and his men landed after having sailed their tiny goat across the ocean. On this same continent, which Leif discovered, thousands of his nationals, men and women, have later found their homes, and this monument will for the coming generations, bear proud witness of the race which counts America's first discoverer among its 2sons.

    But if this undertaking, so honorable for the Scandinavians, is to attain the national significance which it merits, the funds necessary for its completion should be contributed by our own people. The amount of each individual contribution is not so important but the participation should be general, so that it can truly be said that Scandinavians in America erected this monument. If, for instance, every man and woman of our nationality were to donate 25 cents, on the average, a sufficiently large sum would be collected to really show the world that we, as a people, honor our ancestors.

    But if a national subscription is to be undertaken, the invitation should be issued by our most prominent men. Supposing Ole Bull and Professor R. B. Anderson took the lead? The honor and fame which the violin virtuoso has won in the old as well as in the new world, has been reflected back on the nation, and among our countrymen on this side of the ocean, none has done more to 3spread the knowledge of our people's history than Professor Anderson. Both of these men feel warmly for the mother country and our precious memories, and we hope that for the sake of promoting our national honor and dignity, they will go to the front and organize a national subscription for the Leif fund.

    To our forefathers belong undeniably the honor of being the first white men ever to tread upon American soil. We have authoritative historical data evidencing their early arrival on this ...

    Norwegian
    II C, I J, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- May 18, 1892
    [Celebrate Norway's Constitution]

    Three thousand Norwegians celebrated the eighty-eighth anniversary of the adoption of the constitution of Norway, yesterday at Kuhn's Park.

    Fritz Meyer delivered the address of welcome. Then followed B. Bjornson's old and popular song "Ja vi elsker dette landet" (Yes we love this land), sung by the entire crowd. A. O. Thorpe made the festival speech. B. T. Richolson, Coroner, H. L. Hertz, and Peter Svanoe, Vice-Consul for Sweden and Norway also spoke.

    After singing "The Star Spangled Banner" the program was brought to a close.

    The proceeds will be used to purchase an oil painting of Lief Erickson to be exhibited at the World's Fair.

    Three thousand Norwegians celebrated the eighty-eighth anniversary of the adoption of the constitution of Norway, yesterday at Kuhn's Park. Fritz Meyer delivered the address of welcome. Then followed B. Bjornson's ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, II C
  • Skandinaven -- March 19, 1894
    [To Celebrate Norwegian Day] (Summary)

    On May 17th the Leif Erickson Monument Society will celebrate the Norwegian day of independence at Kuhns Park. All Scandinavians are invited. The surplus is going to be used for the erection of a statue of Leif Erickson, first discoverer of America.

    On May 17th the Leif Erickson Monument Society will celebrate the Norwegian day of independence at Kuhns Park. All Scandinavians are invited. The surplus is going to be used for ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, II C
  • Skandinaven -- August 26, 1896
    Save the "Viking" (Editorial)

    The arrival of the "Viking" on July 12, 1893, will be remembered as one of the most interesting and memorable incidents in the history of American Scandinavians. It was only after much effort and trouble that it was arranged, and the Scandinavians here can now say that the effort was worth it.

    The "Viking's" reception in this harbor was the most brilliant naval demonstration Chicago has ever witnessed. The whole city turned out to view the coming of the swan-like craft, and the press extended generous and enthusiastic greetings to the ship and its crew of brave, daring sailors..... The voyage of the "Viking" had been a victorious one from the hour it left its home port until it approached the port of the "white city". Great and enthusiastic crowds lined the shores of the inland waters it traversed, and the reception given it on the coast of New England has been repeated everywhere that its sail has been furled. The "Viking" is an especial object of eager and justifiable pride to our Scandinavian population.

    2

    Their fellow Americans recognize their special claim to the honors of the day, but insist on sharing the interest with them. The hardy craft that carried its high and doughty stem across ocean billows before the science of navigation had made progress adequate even to the later needs of Columbus is well worth the wonder and admiration with which it is everywhere hailed. Now with the caravels and the "Viking" in port, the waters at the "white city" present a more complete appearance of historical dignity and beauty. The little ships will be among the most pathetic (sic) and noble attractions of the Fair from the time of their arrival until the snows of next winter will hide their frail but heroic forms from view.

    ...The "Viking" comes on a peaceful mission. Its errand is only to remind the people of America of the voyages made by the daring Bjorn, the son of Herolf, in the year 981, and by Leif Ericson, in the year 1000, to the eastern shores of this country. The ancient Vikings have received too little credit for their discovery of the New World; their fame has been overshadowed by that of Columbus and the Spanish navigators. It is not to set history right that the"Viking" is brought here, for history has duly recorded the achievements 3of the Norsemen, but it is to impress the historical facts more deeply upon the minds of the people. The thousands who will look upon the staunch little ship while it remains at the World's Fair will not soon forget that to the Norsemen belongs the honor of first having seen and set foot upon the new continent. That is the lesson the "Viking" is meant to teach.

    .... Today is Leif's day, and the model of his little boat is queen of the Chicago harbor. What a wonderful little craft she is to be sure--this "Viking"!

    Last week you wondered at the caravels and at the skill and daring of the sailors. Now go look at the tiny, open boat in which the bold Norsemen went to sea, not only to discover lands, but to conquer them and to pile up material for the romancers of a later century. It is wonderful, yes, wonderful; no less so whether the stout Leif really went a-continent-hunting or whether he was blown out of his course to the rocky coast of Vineland (sic).

    .... Neither the "Viking" nor the Vikings who sailed it all the way across 4the stormy Atlantic and the great fresh-water lakes can complain that there was any lack of warmth in the reception tendered them yesterday on sea and shore.

    They were received in Evanston by a flotilla larger than that which went forth to greet the caravels, and crowded with men more imbued with exuberant enthusiasm than those who went to meet the Santa Maria and her consorts.

    Nor was the Mayor absent from the reception. The reception at Jackson Park, though late in the afternoon, was a great success.

    .... Another ship of discovery now rides at anchor off the "white city". The "Viking" is at last side by side with the three caravels, the Santa Maria, Pinta and Nina. Their wonderful voyages of discovery were five hundred years apart in time and still wider apart in routes and accessories, but they find common anchorage at Chicago.

    Judging from the public interest taken in the arrival of the "Viking" one 5would suppose Leif Ericson's discovery of America was the beginning of the New World's history. The "Viking" may be said to have come into her own and to have been received with a sense of national fellowship. But even had there not been a Scandinavian in our entire population, the "Viking" would have been assured of a most cordial welcome, for every intelligent American must recognize in that voyage of nine centuries ago one of the most remarkable feats of human enterprise.

    When the route of the original Vikings is taken into consideration it is not surprising that no more came of it. That was before the days of the mariner's compass. America reached from Europe only via Greenland and Iceland would have probably remained an unexplored wilderness. Columbus discovered a practical route, having the compass as a guide to his rudder.

    The "Viking" was ahead of the times. The science of navigation needed to be further developed before the New World could become a veritable annex to the Old World. But the very fact that the Norsemen made their great achievement 6before the day of modern navigation had developed so much as a morning star to relieve the darkness of the horizon, makes it all the more astonishing that Scandinavian sea kings crossed the Atlantic just as the tenth century was making room for the eleventh, and while Europe was still black with medieval night. No welcome could have been more cordial or sincere.

    While she remained at Jackson Park the "Viking" was admired by countless and eager throngs from all parts of the country.

    Captain Magnus Anderson intended to present the ship to the national government, and in the fall of 1893 she left Chicago to make her way to Washington by way of the Illinois Canal and River and the Mississippi River. But among the Scandinavians of Chicago it was generally held that the ship ought to remain here. A committee of representative men was formed to ascertain whether the Columbian Museum would accept the "Viking" as a gift from the Scandinavian citizens of the United States, if the ship could be secured for that purpose. To a letter addressed to him by the chairman of the 7"Viking" committee, Mr. Ed. E. Ayer, chairman of the finance committee of the Field Columbian Museum on December 16, 1893, replied as follows:

    "Your letter asking whether the Columbian Museum would like to have the 'Viking', at hand. We do desire it very much. The caravels will be in the Museum, and we want the 'Viking' with them. There will be a special effort made to show the evolution of transportation by sea and land, and nothing would fit in better than the 'Viking'. I trust you will have no difficulty in securing her and having her brought back to Chicago in the Spring."

    This authoritative reply was considered satisfactory. The "Viking" committee immediately went to work to collect funds. The ship was bought from the committee in Norway, and on October 13, 1894 it was formally transferred to the board of directors of the Museum with the understanding that it was to be placed in the Museum in accordance with the letter of Mr. Ayer.

    But thus far the directors have failed to fulfill their part of the agreement. From October 13th, 1894, until last fall the "Viking" remained in the open air without any protection whatever. That she suffered great damage while thus 8exposed to wind and weather goes without saying. Last fall she was housed in with boards and has remained in that condition until recently. Now it is proposed to put her in the lagoon, which cannot but work speedy and complete destruction.

    The Skandinaven is loath to believe that the Museum directors will fail to prevent what would be a flagrant instance of disgraceful vandalism. The ship is a gift to the Museum, solicited by the representatives of the board and accepted on the express condition that it should be put in the Museum to form, permanently, part and parcel of its collection of ethnographic and historical specimens. As yet the board has done nothing to fulfill its agreement, and now it is proposed to make such disposition of the historic craft as would make her speedy destruction inevitable.

    It is impossible to explain the attitude of the directors in this matter by assuming that they have not been fully aware of the precise nature of the terms upon which the ship was presented and accepted. They are honorable gentlemen who would not knowingly commit such a self-evident breach of faith.

    9

    Now that their attention has been called to the character of the contract they have entered into, it is confidently expected that they will take prompt and final action regarding the situation and place the "Viking" in the Museum where she belongs. This paper will do its part to make them do so.

    The arrival of the "Viking" on July 12, 1893, will be remembered as one of the most interesting and memorable incidents in the history of American Scandinavians. It was only ...

    Norwegian
    III F, II B 2 d 1, III B 2, III H, II C, I C, I J
  • Skandinaven -- November 29, 1897
    Nansen in Art (Letter)

    Editor of Skandinaven

    Dear Sir: Sometime ago, Mr. Olaf Ellison suggested in these columns that a bust of Dr. Nansen, in bronze or marble, be made by a Norwegian artist, and that some public-spirited Norwegian, or Norwegians, of Chicago, furnish the necessary funds. He suggested further that the bust be presented to the Chicago Art Institute, where it would serve as a lasting monument to the name of the man whose features were reproduced, to its generous donor, and incidentally, to the Norwegians of Chicago.

    It is singular and not at all creditable that the Norwegians, alone of the three Scandinavian nationalities, are as yet absolutely without representation in the Art Institute, not to mention our heretofore evident failure to erect 2a monument in some park. Our brethren, the Swedes and the Danes, are well represented in the Art Institute and in the parks as well.

    Are the rich, old Norwegian Vikings hiding?

    Of course, they dug into their pockets when the Viking ship was brought [over] and presented to the Fields' Columbian Museum, and when they brought [over] C. Krogh's painting and presented it to the same institution.

    Neither the donors, nor the Norwegian people in general, have been entirely satisfied with the manner in which the proper authorities have treated these generous gifts. But the possible lack of appreciation shown in these two cases does not bar success, if Mr. Ellison's suggestion be acted upon.

    That the idea of selecting Dr. Nansen as the subject for such a bust is a happy one, is demonstrated by the esteem and popularity he is enjoying, so deservedly, among all classes and nationalities, and by the eager interest and sincere 3admiration with which the story of his deeds is received.

    Mr. Asbjornson, whom Mr. Ellison proposes as the right man to do this work, is, as we all know, a young, talented Norwegian sculptor, struggling hard in our midst to reach his goal: a name and success as a Norwegian sculptor in the United States. His several busts of prominent Norwegians and others in this and other cities--lately that of Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesn--have gained for him confidence in his talent from all who are acquainted with his works.

    Is there any Norwegian with heart and means--there are many with either--to put this idea into reality, thus engraving his name on the honor roll of the Norwegian colony in Chicago, as the donor of a bust of Dr. Nansen to the Art Institute? A name thus made will endure, even though the rest of the donor's deeds may be forgotten.

    Editor of Skandinaven Dear Sir: Sometime ago, Mr. Olaf Ellison suggested in these columns that a bust of Dr. Nansen, in bronze or marble, be made by a Norwegian artist, ...

    Norwegian
    II C, II A 3 c, III H, I C
  • Skandinaven -- September 08, 1898
    The Luther Statue Peter M. Balken Approves of the Idea and Starts the Fund

    "Editor of Skandinaven.

    "Dear Sir:

    "I became very much interested when I read the articles written by Reverend Alfred Johnson, wherein he suggests to the Scandinavian people the splendid idea of erecting a statue to the memory of the world's greatest reformer, Martin Luther. I think with him that Mount Olive is the ideal place for a colossal statue upon a grand pedestal facing the contemplated grand entrance soon to be erected, with the inscription of his own famous declaration: 'Here I take my stand. I cannot do otherwise, so help me God. Amen.'

    "It seems to me that every man, woman, and child who loves the great name of Luther will be glad to contribute their bit. Therefore, allow me to 2suggest that Reverend Johnson go right to work and appoint a secretary and a treasurer, he himself acting as chairman until such a time as it will become necessary for him to make up an active working committee of men thoroughly known to the Scandinavian public for their honesty and integrity.

    "I,like many of the Scandinavian old settlers of Chicago, own a lot in Graceland, and I am afraid it will not be many years before the fashionable residences on grand Sheridan Drive will compel its removal, the same as we were driven out of Lincoln Park. Naturally, Mount Olive will be our choice, at least mine. It is so far removed that it will never be disturbed by any of those disturbing influences, and at the same time within easy reach for all.

    "Please permit me to become the first to lay my little offering as a nucleus. I hope that I am the first to donate the twenty-five cents as suggested by the pastor, and that one hundred thousand will in like manner follow suit. And I earnestly pray that God in his bountiful 3mercy will add his blessing, as I remain

    "Yours truly,

    "Peter N. Balken."

    "Editor of Skandinaven. "Dear Sir: "I became very much interested when I read the articles written by Reverend Alfred Johnson, wherein he suggests to the Scandinavian people the splendid idea ...

    Norwegian
    III C, II C
  • Scandia -- November 11, 1899
    The Leif Ericson Committee

    The recently formed Leif Ericson Committee has started a campaign to raise money for the erection of a monument in honor of the Norwegian explorer and discoverer of America.

    The Committee announces that a fall festival will soon be held.

    The recently formed Leif Ericson Committee has started a campaign to raise money for the erection of a monument in honor of the Norwegian explorer and discoverer of America. The ...

    Norwegian
    II C
  • Skandinaven -- May 30, 1900
    The Leif Ericson Monument

    The Leif Ericson Monument Society had a general meeting last Monday evening at Scandia Hall. The treasurer, Mr. C. H. Lee, presented a report for the past half year, showing a balance of $2,030.52 in the treasury.

    Mr. L. E. Olson was re-elected president and C. H. Lee, P. A. Sjolie, C. Neargard and A. C. Thorsen were chosen directors. F. Ferdinantsen, Lind Hansen, A. Jorgensen, and Hans Hansen will continue as directors.

    A sketch of the monument, presented by Mr. Emil Bjorn, was accepted. The directors were instructed to contract with the sculptors' firm of Black & Company for the making of a statue in the course of the summer. The monument is to be nine feet high and will be cast in bronze. The board of directors reserves the right to accept or reject any model which the firm may present. It has been estimated that the monument will cost over three thousand dollars, so that the Society still needs about one third of the required amount.

    2

    The question arose, at the meeting, as to where the monument ought to be located. Some suggested Logan Square, others Humboldt Park. Final decision in this matter was postponed until another meeting.

    The Leif Ericson Monument Society had a general meeting last Monday evening at Scandia Hall. The treasurer, Mr. C. H. Lee, presented a report for the past half year, showing ...

    Norwegian
    II C, III B 2, IV
  • Skandinaven -- June 02, 1900
    The Leif Ericson Monument A Norwegian Protests against Suggested Plan by a Norwegian

    In a report from the last meeting of the Society for the Leif Ericson Monument, published in Skandinaven for May 30, it is stated: "A sketch for the monument, presented by Mr. Emil Bjorn, was adopted, and the board of directors was instructed to contract with the sculpture firm Black and Company for the making of a statue in the course of the summer."

    It is true, then, that the Society for the Leif Ericson Monument actually intends to erect a monument as indicated in Humboldt Park. It is no use to try to camouflage the matter by designating Black and Company as a sculpture firm. The firm is simply a company which executes whatever is 2ordered, in iron or in bronze, in accordance with drawings submitted. Statues of this type may be quite agreeable to look at--as ornaments in private gardens, at water outlets, etc.--but there is hardly anybody who would call these productions works of art. When, on the other hand, the question is concerning a statue to be erected in one of the parks of the city, and especially where it is a question of a man, the looks of whom nobody knows, then we must demand, first of all, that the statue be a work of art.

    Black and Company possess many statues already finished. Why not buy one of these, then paint in large letters easy to read: "This is supposed to be Leif Ericson." If this were done the fee to Mr. Emil Bjorn would be saved, too. Nobody could claim that the figure thus placed in the park would not be a true likeness of Leif Ericson.

    The Society for the Leif Ericson Monument has taken upon itself the responsibility 3of acting for the Norwegians in Chicago. But in doing so, the Society is under obligation to carry out its undertaking in a manner worthy of the Norwegians.

    The Society must not attempt a short cut in order to get rid of the whole matter. Either the Society must get enough money to secure the erection of a monument which is a piece of art, or else wait until the necessary money can be raised in other ways.

    We, who are not members of the Society for the Leif Ericson Monument, are not satisfied to have the Society place in one of the City's parks a statue of the explorer that will be laughed at by people who understand art.

    The members of the Society for the Leif Ericson Monument are nice, decent people, but it is hardly a misstatement to say that they do not understand 4art. The present writer begs to urge the Norwegian artists in Chicago to present their views on the matter.

    The sketch presented by Mr. Emil Bjorn is attractive and well executed, as is everything coming from his hand, but this fact does not alter the matter in question. Does Mr. Bjorn really believe that a statue constructed by the firm mentioned above to coincide with his sketch will be a work of art as the term is understood in our days? In other words, does Mr. Bjorn believe that the statue to be ordered will compare, from the point of view of art, with that of Linne erected by the Swedes, or that of H. C. Andersen erected by the Danish, etc.? What do Messrs. Asbjornson, Svendsen, and Hawlins think of the matter?

    And finally, does the Society for the Leif Ericson Monument know that there is in existence a committee, appointed by the Governor, the objective of which is to determine whether or not a statue is worthy of being placed in 5the parks of the city, and has the Society made inquiry as to whether this committee will accept a statue which will bear the earmarks of the ready-made? Many Norwegians in Chicago would be interested in some information on these questions. If a monument is to be erected, it ought to be one of which the Norwegians may justly be proud.

    In a report from the last meeting of the Society for the Leif Ericson Monument, published in Skandinaven for May 30, it is stated: "A sketch for the monument, presented ...

    Norwegian
    II C, III B 2, I C, IV
  • Skandinaven -- June 05, 1900
    The Leif Ericson Monument The Manner of Ordering the Monument by "Fair Play"

    We hear that a tombstone is to be erected for Leif Ericson here in Chicago. Chicago has about 60,000 Norwegians, and since it had been shown that no worthy monument had been erected for Leif Ericson, it was resolved that Chicago should do it.

    For many years the committee in question has been at work, and now we hear of the result: a tombstone! A tombstone over Leif Ericson, and at the same time, over the Norwegians in Chicago!

    Some wild stories are abroad about Mr. Sigvald Asbjornsen, the sculptor, and his attitude in this matter. We regret to have to say that certain members of 2the Leif Ericson Monument Society have been instrumental in spreading these stories. The present writer heard the story from the president of the Society, Mr. L. E. Olson, in person, and the gist of the matter was that Mr. Asbjornsen had attempted to force the Committee to pay him an unreasonable price for doing the work. The plain fact is that Mr. Asbjornsen has never received any proposition in regard to the matter. Four years ago Mr. Asbjornsen met one of the members of the Society in a streetcar, and the latter then asked Mr. Asbjornsen about the probable cost of this possible monument. Mr. Asbjornsen gave an indefinite answer to the indefinite question, and since then he has heard nothing about the question and knew nothing of it until he read about it in the papers and was informed by Black and Company that the contract had been signed. And after that, Mr. Black came to Mr. Asbjornsen to ask him if he would make the statue in accordance with Mr. Bjorn's drawing.

    Mr. Asbjornsen answered that under any circumstances, if he were to make the statue, he must make it in accordance with his own ideas and not with the drawings of somebody else. Such is the status of the matter now.

    3

    Of course, Mr. Black understands that a statue which does not carry the name of a sculptor would be more or less worthless and would not be permitted to be erected in a civilized city. For this reason he is now trying to have Mr. Asbjornsen lend his name to the statue, at a ridiculously low fee.

    This piece of history, then, was enacted in Chicago in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred, and the actors in the scene were "representative Norwegians"! And thus the Norwegians will be planting a nice tombstone--over themselves!

    We hear that a tombstone is to be erected for Leif Ericson here in Chicago. Chicago has about 60,000 Norwegians, and since it had been shown that no worthy monument ...

    Norwegian
    II C, III B 2, IV