The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- July 27, 1880
    A New Scandinavian Monthly

    The Viking seems to be a paper with a future. It has already found a great number of readers. It is published at 269 Milwaukee Avenue. The Viking is filled with humor and satire. We feel that it will be welcomed by Scandinavian readers.

    The Viking seems to be a paper with a future. It has already found a great number of readers. It is published at 269 Milwaukee Avenue. The Viking is filled ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 2
  • Skandinaven -- November 25, 1892
    Professor Boyesen on the Scandinavians (Editorial)

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor Boyesen is supposed to be thoroughly at home in this field, and it is needless to say that the picture he has drawn is in the main true to life. Yet we venture to assert that it fails to do justice either to the painter or the "paintee."

    That Mr. Boyesen should repeat and emphasize the stale slander about Scandinavians at home was a surprise as painful as it was unexpected. There is no excuse whatever for such a glaring misstatement of fact. Whatever may have been true, or not true, in the past of the Scandinavians in this respect, it certainly cannot be maintained that the Scandinavians of today are more addicted to drunkenness than are other peoples, or races, subject to similar conditions of life.

    2

    During the past generation the temperance reformer has found no more promising field than on the Scandinavian peninsula. Nowhere has he attained greater or more substantial results. Excepting the peninsulas of southern Europe there is no country in Europe where the consumption of intoxicating liquors per capita is less than in Norway. Sweden also made rapid and substantial progress in her war on the dram shop. The Danes, like their southern neighbors, are still a people of rather steady drinkers; yet it is a fact that there is comparatively little drunkenness in Denmark.

    The same is true of Scandinavians in this country. In the West and Northwest the most determined and aggressive regiments in the army of temperance warriors have been recruited from among the Scandinavian farmer population of that section. The present High License Law of Minnesota is their work, and they are the leaders in the recent movement for more rigid restrictions. It was the Norwegians who forced prohibition upon North Dakota. In South Dakota, in Iowa, in Nebraska, in Kansas, the Norwegians and Swedes--excepting those dealing in intoxicants--stand firm and united in support of restrictive legislation.

    3

    It is not necessary for the purpose in hand to search for the source of the current belief that the Scandinavians are a race of drunkards. Most of those who hold it are not to blame. They have been misinformed, and do not know any better. But certainly, it could not be otherwise than painfully surprising to find the falsehood repeated in a publication of the high standing of The North American Review over the signature of Professor Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen. Most of the readers of this excellent magazine naturally take it for granted that writers admitted to its pages know what they are talking about. Their statements are generally believed whether true or false. It is sincerely to be regretted that Mr. Boyesen should fail to make better use of his splendid opportunity to cut the roots from a current falsehood.

    Mr. Boyesen's picture of the Scandinavians in the West is rather unattractive. If it is true, he cannot be blamed for that. But we think the general verdict will be that it is incomplete and misleading. He exaggerates the mutual jealousy alleged to exist between the three Scandinavian Nationalities. In proof of this assertion it is sufficient to point to the outcome of the recent election in Minnesota. He is unjust to the Norwegian Lutheran clergy. There 4may be, and probably are, mossbacks among them as well as in all other walks of life; but it is true that as a class, the ministers of the Norwegian Lutheran Church are opposed to general and national education. Among the students in the colleges and universities of the West, the Scandinavian youth are well represented. Most of these Scandinavian boys and girls are farmers' sons and daughters, who, with their parents' consent, have gone "in search of strange gods," as it is their aim to prepare themselves for a successful business or professional career.

    No hostility to the public schools is found among Scandinavian Lutheran Churches, nor can it be said that they are endeavoring to establish a system of parochial schools, strictly speaking. On the contrary, it is well understood throughout the Northwest that Scandinavian protestantism is a strong and unyielding bulwark of the unsectarian common school system.

    Exception might be taken also to other statements made in Professor Boyesen's paper. But this will do for the present. It might be added that a portion of 5his article containing all the doubtful elements in his picture of "The Scandinavians in the United States" has caught the eye of the exchange editor; and he has already started upon a more or less extensive journey into the columns of the daily and weekly press. Thus disconnected and isolated, this part of the article is a libel upon the Scandinavians as well as upon the author. Professor Boyesen undoubtedly regrets this use of his article as much as we do.

    We have critized frankly Professor Boyesen's statements. But we have no desire to be unjust to him or anybody else. If we have misrepresented his position or views in any way, he is welcome to the use of our columns. We shall also be glad to stand corrected if it be shown that we are mistaken in our views, or have made incorrect statements of facts.

    The current issue of The North American Review contains an article from the pen of Professor H. H. Boyesen on the subject of the Scandinavians in the United States. Professor ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 2, I B 3 b, I A 1 a, I B 1, III C, I B 4, V B
  • Scandia -- July 21, 1899
    Gauken (Advertisement) Gauken Illustrated Weekly for Family Use Published by Sigurd Sjol (Published once and for all) Subscription Rates (never paid in advance)

    1 year free
    6 months half-price

    [Translator's note: Gauken was published by the Bjorgrin Singing Society.

    2

    It was supposed to be a humorous paper.]

    <table> <tr> <td>1 year</td> <td>free</td> </tr> <tr> <td>6 months</td> <td>half-price</td> </tr> </table> [Translator's note: Gauken was published by the Bjorgrin Singing Society. <a name="p2" class="page-break">2</a> It was supposed to be ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 2, II B 1 a
  • Skandinaven -- June 03, 1907
    Nordlandingen

    The Nordlandingen (Northlander) Society was presented with a Norwegian flag and an American flag, both of silk, by the ladies of the Society at a banquet Saturday evening in Jacobsen's Hall. More than a hundred guests were present.

    Henry Jentoft was the toastmaster. He introduced Mr. A. B. Lange, who delivered an oration on the Norwegian flag. After the speech the Norwegian national hymn was sung by the Norwegian Glee Club. H. Altern spoke for the American flag, and the "Red, White, and Blue" was sung.

    Loveur Werner then stated that the Society had been organized eight years ago and had constantly progressed. He also extended the thanks of Nordlandingen to the ladies for the flags.

    The latest number of the Club's paper, Nordlandtrompeten (The Trumpet of the 2Northland) [was read], and A. B. Lange spoke [concerning it].

    After the tables had been cleared, there was dancing till late at night.

    The Nordlandingen (Northlander) Society was presented with a Norwegian flag and an American flag, both of silk, by the ladies of the Society at a banquet Saturday evening in Jacobsen's ...

    Norwegian
    II D 1, III B 2, II B 2 d 2
  • Skandinaven -- January 08, 1909
    Why Not Hoist the True Colors? by C. K. Solberg

    A news item appearing in Skandinaven about a week ago needs correction since it tends to support a mistaken opinion by a large number of our Norwegian Lutheran people in and outside of Chicago concerning the religious paper, Evangelisten, as well as concerning the Norwegian Evangelical Free Church in this city.

    Evangelisten is not a Lutheran paper and it is not published by the Norwegian Lutheran congregation. The paper contains much good edifying material, but it supports the Norwegian free church movement which is connected with the American Congregational Church....The paper is worthy of recommendation to Congregationalists but not to Lutherans...I feel it my duty to call the attention 2of Norwegian Lutherans to the fact the Evangelisten is not Lutheran.

    Many of our Christian people who on coming from Norway are not acquainted with church conditions in America; but, being opposed to the state church in Norway, they get the impression that our Norwegian Lutheran Church in America is identical with the state church in Norway, and that the free church movement here corresponds to the Lutheran Free Church in Norway. The truth is, of course, that every Lutheran congregation in America is a free church. We have no state church here. But not every free church is Lutheran....Why need we have this lack of clear information in regard to the confession of faith and the true character of the Norwegian Free Church?

    A news item appearing in Skandinaven about a week ago needs correction since it tends to support a mistaken opinion by a large number of our Norwegian Lutheran people in ...

    Norwegian
    III C, II B 2 d 2, III H
  • Skandinaven -- January 14, 1909
    Why Not Hoist True Colors? by Ingvald Andersen

    Referring to the article in last Friday's edition of Skandinaven, by Reverend C. K. Solberg, I beg to make the following observations:

    The paper referred to in the article, the Evangelisten never sailed under false colors. In Evangelisten's first number of the present year, issued on January 1, one week before the article by Mr. Solberg was written, the following appeared, announcing the policy of the paper:

    "Evangelisten represents an organized, biblical, evangelical free religious activity in which every believer is a priest and has the right to read and interpret the Bible under the guidance of the Holy Spirit....."

    2

    Reverend Solberg is a subscriber to the Evangelisten and has undoubtedly read the statement quoted. In addition, in a conversation with him, I definitely emphasized that in the paper the question of doctrine is considered of less importance compared with the central figure in Christianity, the crucified Christ.

    In his article Reverend Solberg says that the contents of the Evangelisten are good and even recommendable....Everything considered, I can but come to the conclusion that Reverend Solberg finds that the paper under discussion is not very dangerous--even for a Lutheran. I am afraid that there are other than doctrinal fears which have been inducing Reverend Solberg to make his attack.

    [Translator's note: The paper and certain churches connected with it had been comparatively successful in their work. Mr. Andersen intimates that the cause of Mr. Solberg's attack is jealousy.]

    Referring to the article in last Friday's edition of Skandinaven, by Reverend C. K. Solberg, I beg to make the following observations: The paper referred to in the article, the ...

    Norwegian
    III C, II B 2 d 2
  • Skandinaven -- January 22, 1909
    Norwegian Orphanage Society Annual Meeting--Report by Financial Committee

    During the year the financial committee has sent out a large number of subscription-books to people in Chicago and in the Norwegian Lutheran congregations about the country. The treasurer reports that only a few of these have been returned to him in spite of repeated requests in writing and in the papers to the holders of the books.

    The financial committee has also sent out 10,000 copies of the first issue of Orphans' Friend for free distribution in churches and societies.

    During the year the financial committee has sent out a large number of subscription-books to people in Chicago and in the Norwegian Lutheran congregations about the country. The treasurer reports ...

    Norwegian
    II D 4, II B 2 d 2
  • Skandinaven -- July 29, 1909
    The Norwegian National Association (Editorial)

    The Norwegian National Association's sixth booklet for 1909 contains the annual report of the Association for 1908-1909, and also an account of the annual meeting on June 22.

    The booklet contains two special articles, one by J. B. Wist, the other by J. A. Jacobsen, of Duluth, Minnesota. The former describes the historical growth and development of "Norway in America", the purpose being mainly to give the Norwegians in Norway a better understanding of our people in this country. The latter, which advises the Norwegians to stay on their "Mothers' farms", treats of some of the difficulties connected with the change of homeland. Mr. Jacobsen has seen much which has awakened his ire, and is writing in ink colored somewhat with "heated blood". [Translator's note: There are also articles by Dr. Kohman, Messrs. Quam, H. Rued Holand, and 2W. Halvorsen.] The subscription price is $4 a year.

    The Norwegian National Association's sixth booklet for 1909 contains the annual report of the Association for 1908-1909, and also an account of the annual meeting on June 22. The booklet ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 2, III B 2
  • Scandia -- December 21, 1910
    Portraits Otto Christian Ericson

    Otto Christian Ericson was born in Guldbrandsdalen, Norway, in 1852. He arrived in Chicago with his father in 1868. He worked as carpenter's apprentice for a year. In 1869 he went to work for Christian Jevne on Kinzie Street.

    Ericson was, as far as, is known, the first businessman in Chicago to publish a "house organ"; he called the weekly paper Bon Vivant. Bon Vivant is considered the best house organ in America today.

    In 1887 H.H. Kohlsaat, then owner of the Chicago Inter-Ocean offered to Ericson a half interest in a western chain of restaurants. Jevne then, because of Kohlsaat's offer, gave to Ericson a quarter interest in Jevne and Company.

    After Jevne's death Ericson purchased the remaining interest in Jevne and Company. He employs today 125 people in his [grocery] business. He has a branch store on the South Side.

    Otto Christian Ericson was born in Guldbrandsdalen, Norway, in 1852. He arrived in Chicago with his father in 1868. He worked as carpenter's apprentice for a year. In 1869 he ...

    Norwegian
    II A 2, II B 2 d 2, IV
  • Skandinaven -- June 12, 1911
    [Norwegian Lutheran] Hauge's Synod

    A report on the schools and publications maintained by the Synod was recently given at the sixty-sixth annual conference of the Norwegian Lutheran Hauge's Synod.

    The two colleges, the Red Wing Seminary and the Jewell College, have both grown enormously....During the last three semesters, the schools were filled to capacity.....Twenty students were ordained in the colleges this year.

    The monthly paper, Budbeareren, has doubled its circulation in the last year.....

    A report on the schools and publications maintained by the Synod was recently given at the sixty-sixth annual conference of the Norwegian Lutheran Hauge's Synod. The two colleges, the Red ...

    Norwegian
    III C, II B 2 d 2, I A 2 a