The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- May 29, 1872
    [Langeland Resigns]

    K. Langeland, chief editor of the Skandinaven, has sent in his resignation. He hopes that during his six years as chief editor he has done some good and satisfied them somewhat through his different articles. He would like to continue his work, but circumstances alter everything; hence the resignation. Mr. Langeland wishes to thank all the readers for their kindness and consideration during his six years of work at Skandinaven. He also wishes to thank his co-workers for their loyalty and good work. First and foremost he sends a kind farewell to all readers of Skandinaven.

    K. Langeland, chief editor of the Skandinaven, has sent in his resignation. He hopes that during his six years as chief editor he has done some good and satisfied them ...

    Norwegian
    IV, II B 2 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- December 31, 1872
    To the Readers of Skandinaven

    In consolidating the Skandinaven with the Amerika, I take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude to the subscribers of Skandinaven for the liberal support they have given the paper. I am proud to state that in the short space of six years and eight months, the Skandinaven is the leading Norwegian-Danish paper in this country, which is owing to the increasing energy of both its editors and manager and the liberal support it has received from the public in general. At the time of the great fire in Chicago, I lost nearly all that I had worked for from childhood. But the credit and reputation that the paper had in Chicago enabled me to give the readers a Skandinaven the same week of the fire; and from that time it has increased far beyond my expectations. Now that I have decided that it is best and wisest to unite with the Amerika. I hope you will not be disappointed but on the contrary pleased with this application of the old truth that "in unity there is strength." With the sincere thanks for past favors and hoping for their continuation, I commend the Skandinaven and Amerika to a generous public.

    John Anderson

    In consolidating the Skandinaven with the Amerika, I take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude to the subscribers of Skandinaven for the liberal support they have given the paper. I ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- May 28, 1878
    To Skandinaven's Readers

    I hereby beg to inform you that I am resigning as part owner and publisher of Skandinaven and at the same time I am taking the opportunity to thank the readers, for all their consideration shown the paper during my time.

    About five years has passed since I started to work among the Scandinavians in the N.W. and I am glad to say that these five years have not been wasted. I will always think back with joy on these years.

    My former partner, Mr. John Anderson, will now be Skandinavens sole owner. The readers know him well. Thirteen years ago Anderson was one of the owners. Mr. Anderson has done a great deal for the progress of Norwegian and American papers. He made the Skandinaven a worthy representative for the Norwegians intelligence in America. Regarding Skandinavens future it looks bright; the paper is built on a solid foundation. The Skandinaven to day is far superior to any other Scandinavian paper in the U.S.A.

    I hereby beg to inform you that I am resigning as part owner and publisher of Skandinaven and at the same time I am taking the opportunity to thank the ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1, IV
  • Skandinaven -- February 11, 1879
    Literary Death Notice

    Den Norsk-Amerikanske Independent, a newspaper published in this city, announces in its last issue that after having suffered for a considerable time from progressive consumption, (probably induced by peevishness and zall-sickness),it has decided to give up its ghost.

    The publisher of Norden has taken over the mailing list and also the unpaid bills of the deceased.

    Den Norsk-Amerikanske Independent, a newspaper published in this city, announces in its last issue that after having suffered for a considerable time from progressive consumption, (probably induced by peevishness and ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- May 13, 1879
    The Seamen

    The seamen on Lake Michigan have had a hard time of it in the last few years. They have had to work long hours for small pay. Now because of the propaganda carried on in the columns of this paper, we can report that one dollar and fifty cents has been established as the minimum wage per day.

    The Scandinavian seamen, who by the way, are in the majority, can look forward to better conditions.

    The seamen on Lake Michigan have had a hard time of it in the last few years. They have had to work long hours for small pay. Now because of ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1, I C
  • Illinois Staats-Zeitung -- November 01, 1879
    Political Meetings The Scandinavians

    The Norwegian Republicans held a protest meeting yesterday at 235 Milwaukee Avenue, because the Scandinavian newspapers of Chicago scratched part of the Republican ticket and substituted Democratic candidates in the columns of the aforesaid papers. Many felt incensed, and therefore called a protest meeting. About 120 persons responded. A chorus provided musical entertainment. Peter Backes was named chairman. He criticized the Scandinavian press, which has endeavored to destroy the Republican party in Chicago at a time when the Republican party is making efforts to obtain such a plurality that the South and its ideology would have no chance for survival. The conduct of the Scandinavian press was particularly deplorable, considering that our present municipal administration fired every Swedish and Norwegian office holder. He appealed to the people, to remain forever faithful to the Republican party. We should not be misled by the Swedes because the papers proposed an independent ticket composed of candidates from both parties. It was said the action was taken because 2Scandinavians were not represented on the Republican ticket. Such a demand should have been made at the convention when candidates were nominated. As this was not done, no one would be justified in claiming now that the wishes of the people were ignored. This would be no reason to change the ticket.

    Boyeson was the second speaker. He said that no one should forsake the party just because it failed to comply to an individual's wishes. He, for instance, may have favored free trade, but the Republican party preferred a tariff; but that would be no reason for leaving the party. There were many other questions decidedly more important. This should be considered before changing one's affiliation. Such a case was presented here. The action of the Scandinavian press was inexcusable. There papers did not express the true sentiment of the Scandinavians. He regarded as traitors the Scandinavians who would vote the independent [split] ticket at the coming election. The Democratic party would use every chance to win. The impending county election would be of national significance, as the next presidential election would be influenced thereby. The Democrats should not gain the upper hand as long as the South persisted in its 3threatening attitude, which disregarded the rights of the whites and blacks alike.

    The speaker then explained why no Scandinavians were nominated. It was because so many Scandinavian candidates were offered and their respective constituents refused to support any man other than their own nominee. The Germans and other nationals acted more sensibly. They came to the convention fully organized, and if one of their men had been nominated, he would have been given support by all factions.

    Gilbert Olsen was the third speaker. He attacked the Scandinavian press vigorously and considered it an insolence that these papers intended to foist a ticket on the Scandinavians which the people did not want. But the Scandinavians were not the kind of people who would vote any sort of ticket advocated by the press.

    Mr. Backen was the next speaker. He said that the Scandinavian press offered a 4fusion ticket without having held a political meeting to consider the will of the people. He believed Republicanism was so firmly rooted among the Scandinavians here that none would forsake it. He was of the opinion that, as far as the papers were concerned, in this particular instance the views of the people were not sufficiently considered. But this was not done intentionally.

    By this time, the committee which had been named to draft a resolution had finished its work; the resolution was read to the assembly, which adopted it. The procedure of the Scandinavian press was criticized, and the people were urged to object.

    Finally, Mr. Matson spoke. He said that the Scandinavian editors did not use their heads. It was expedient under the circumstances to oppose the machinations of these newspapermen. It would make a bad impression if the people who were at the Republican convention and adopted the platform should now withdraw.

    The assembly conveyed the impression that the Norwegians would vote unanimously for the Republican ticket.

    The Norwegian Republicans held a protest meeting yesterday at 235 Milwaukee Avenue, because the Scandinavian newspapers of Chicago scratched part of the Republican ticket and substituted Democratic candidates in the ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, II B 2 d 1, I F 2, I C
  • Skandinaven -- May 19, 1883
    Scandinavian Culture

    Most of the Scandinavian organizations have libraries with many volumes of books of an excellent quality. Some of the societies publish papers, and all sponsor lectures which have proved beneficial.

    There is at this time an idea being discussed which should be interesting if it materializes; namely, the organization of a radical political club. The proposed name is "The Karl Marx Club." Of course, those joining this club for the most part will be the social Democrats who had to leave Denmark, Norway, and Sweden suddenly. A club of this kind should find many supporters among the Democratic element here, but we feel that the Republicans would fight any organization of this type, so we may or may not live to see this club organized.

    Most of the Scandinavian organizations have libraries with many volumes of books of an excellent quality. Some of the societies publish papers, and all sponsor lectures which have proved beneficial. ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 a, II B 2 d 1, II B 2 g, I E
  • Skandinaven -- March 29, 1889
    [The Dagbladet Begins Publication]

    A new paper has been started here in Chicago, a paper which hides under the label "non-partisan," but which must be, to judge by its editorials, a mouthpiece of the Democratic party.

    According to its editor, a very, very, young man, the paper will not bother with anything old; it will only concern itself with what is new and modern.

    We are rather at a loss to know what to think about this new venture, because we do not believe there is room for a Democratic paper here. The Skandinaven fills the dual role of spokesman for both parties.

    A new paper has been started here in Chicago, a paper which hides under the label "non-partisan," but which must be, to judge by its editorials, a mouthpiece of the ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 d 1
  • Skandinaven -- February 16, 1892
    Norwegians in Chicago (Editorial)

    It is not known when the first Norwegian arrived in Chicago, but we do know that there were a number of Norwegians here in 1850.

    Pastor Paul Anderson organized the first Norwegian Lutheran Church here, about 1850. There are only a few of the original settlers left, among whom is Mrs. Iver Larsen, whose son Victor Lawson, is the owner of the Daily News.

    John Anderson, the publisher of Scandinaven, came here about 1848; at that time Jens Olsen, Mrs. Andrew Nielsen, and Dr. Paoli were already settled here.

    John Anderson began to publish Scandinaven in 1865. Norden and Amerika 2were started in the seventies.

    The Norwegian settlers lived around Huron, May, Erie, Indiana and Superior streets. Milwaukee Avenue was their main street.

    The first bank in Chicago was started by a Norwegian, The Chicago State Bank; the president, H. A. Haugan, came to Chicago in 1859 and in 1879 he and Mr. Lindgren started the bank.

    Paul O. Stensland started the Milwaukee Avenue State Bank; he came to Chicago in 1871.

    It is not known when the first Norwegian arrived in Chicago, but we do know that there were a number of Norwegians here in 1850. Pastor Paul Anderson organized the ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II A 2, III A, III C, III G, IV
  • Skandinaven -- February 17, 1892
    Norwegians in Chicago

    Olaf E. Ray came to Chicago in 1880; he became a lawyer in 1886. P. D. Stromme, editor of Norden, and E. M. Kalheim, editor of Amerika, arrived in Chicago in the seventies, and have become leaders in many of our large societies.

    Olaf E. Ray came to Chicago in 1880; he became a lawyer in 1886. P. D. Stromme, editor of Norden, and E. M. Kalheim, editor of Amerika, arrived in Chicago ...

    Norwegian
    I C, II B 2 d 1, II A 1, IV