The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- December 16, 1882
    Scandinavian Literary Society

    Chicago's first Scandinavian literary society has been organized with a very large membership. The society hopes to perpetuate Scandinavian culture through lectures, readings and discussions.

    Chicago's first Scandinavian literary society has been organized with a very large membership. The society hopes to perpetuate Scandinavian culture through lectures, readings and discussions.

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g
  • Skandinaven -- September 02, 1892
    The Scandinavian Literary Society

    Last night a large group of Scandinavians met in the Sherman House. There, after much discussion, the Scandinavian Literary Society was organized.

    The purpose of the society is to unite all the Scandinavian people, around Art, Literature and Music. The capital already subscribed is over $10,000.

    The following officers were elected:

    Dr. Balthazar Meyer, chairman; Mr. Sverre Lie, recording secretary; Axel Wessman, president; A. C. Garde, financial secretary; O. C. Hansen, cashier.

    The organizer is Anton Koldrup.

    Last night a large group of Scandinavians met in the Sherman House. There, after much discussion, the Scandinavian Literary Society was organized. The purpose of the society is to unite ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- January 03, 1893
    Scandinavians Gathering a Library

    The Scandinavian Literary Society of Chicago is a newly incorporated club which has just opened quarters in the Schiller Bldg.

    While the main purpose will be the accumulation of a library of rare Scandinavian books and the cultivation of national literature and lore, it will have the distinctive features of a social and exclusive club.

    It already has about one-hundred members, including the leading and wealthiest representatives of the race in the city. It's spacious rooms are in the Schiller Building and are handsomely outfitted. A. E. Roewas, who won The Tribune competitive prize for municipal colors, is the libraries, and he says that in order to give this library a standing among Chicago libraries it has been decided to direct special attention to collecting such works from the 2rich Scandinavian literature, both in print and manuscript, as are not to be found in the present public libraries. Special attention will also be paid to the securing of works of Scandinavian authors in other languages and the works of foreign authors pertaining to Scandinavian history and culture. In connection with the library there will be a reading-room to be furnished with magazines and newspapers. The officers of the society, which also constitute a Board of Directors, are: Axel J. Wessman, President; Anton M. Kolderup, First Vice-Press; John Rasmussen, Second Vice-Pres; Alfred C. Garde, Recording Sec'y; Gustav Siostrom, Cor. Sec'y; S. J. Christensen, Treasurer; A. J. Roewad, Librarian. The seal of the club is the municipal design with the monogram S.L.S., the whole surmounted by a phoenix. As Scandinavia historically, as well as in literature and language, comprise the Kingdoms of Sweden, Norway and Denmark; the officers are about equally selected from the three countries. The President this year is a Swede, the First Vice-President a Norwegian, and the second a Dane.

    The Scandinavian Literary Society of Chicago is a newly incorporated club which has just opened quarters in the Schiller Bldg. While the main purpose will be the accumulation of a ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 a, I C
  • Skandinaven -- November 10, 1898
    Profitable Organizations

    In a recent issue of your paper I saw an article regarding a debating club and the difficulties through which it passed, though it survived and prospered. it matters not from what motive such objections arise; they show that such people are against progress in the nineteenth century. There are people who hang their heads in religious pretense, thinking that a debating society is a hindrance to religion. Not at all. Anybody with common sense can possess intelligence and religion at the same time. What is the use of being so radical? What is the use, I say. Is it not better to use all the honest and reasonable means you can (you who have the ability and, perhaps, the experience) to help enlighten people in these lonely country-places, where advantages are so slim and scarce? Where the people have religious services in the little schoolhouse only once a month, perhaps, is a debating society not an excellent thing in such localities? Is there anything better if they be conducted right? And in places where there is dancing, and the young people 2spend their precious winter time at these valueless amusements, what would be better than a debating society or a literary club?

    I know of a locality where there are scores of young people of all ages, all bright and ambitious, who have reveled in country dances, etc., to their hearts' content. I organized a debating club which had a literary program as one of its features. We met every Saturday night (that being the only convenient time). The first meeting was not large, but the next one was; the club grew until the schoolhouse became too small for us. Other amusements of every description became a thing of the past, and debate night was the theme and anticipation of the week. And all, even those who had never picked up a paper or a book to read, and who were looked upon as extremely unintelligent, began to study in order to attain some kind of standing in a debating society.

    After about two years this society was the boast of the town; every schoolboy 3was aspiring for a place on the program, or as an officer of the society. Everyone wanted to debate, and they did, and profited by it. Those whom the people had called ignoramuses began to speak about books, politics, and even science and art, taking a part in the entire program of the society, and soon they were so developed that we could not get along without them. They became our star speakers, and they did not need much urging on account of their natural brightness.

    How proud I am when I think of our little organization! What a noble effort it is to help enlighten and develop the youth, whether it be politically, spiritually or educationally. I have spent some years of my life doing so, and am most deeply interested in such work. I shall do more in the future along this line.

    What do you think of this, worthy readers of Skandinaven? Let us hear from you, and soon, through the columns of this grand old paper, which is read by 4so many who seem to devour its every word. People who object to an organization of this kind are not in it, in this age of kodaks and snapshots. "Keep abreast of the times," my friends; you need not abandon your religion by so doing.

    In a recent issue of your paper I saw an article regarding a debating club and the difficulties through which it passed, though it survived and prospered. it matters not ...

    Norwegian
    II B 2 g, II B 1 d, III E
  • Skandinaven -- February 07, 1904
    [Plan Series of Four Lectures] (Summary)

    "The Norwegian League" is going to give four public lectures in the Schley School, Leavitt Street and Patomac Avenue. Professor Julius C. Olsen from Wisconsin University is to speak in English about the four foremost Norwegian authors: Henrik Ibsen, Bjornstjerne Bjornson, Jonas Lie and Arne Garborg. This will give all Norwegian-American a chance to get acquainted with their own authors at home.

    "The Norwegian League" is going to give four public lectures in the Schley School, Leavitt Street and Patomac Avenue. Professor Julius C. Olsen from Wisconsin University is to speak in ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, II B 2 g
  • Skandinaven -- June 25, 1904
    [Hold Successful Festival]

    The Norwegian Reading Club had a very successful St. Hans Festival in the Norwegian Turner Hall, 586 California Avenue. The hall and the garden were decorated with flags and lanterns. The Norwegian Singing Society entertained the crowd.

    The Norwegian Reading Club had a very successful St. Hans Festival in the Norwegian Turner Hall, 586 California Avenue. The hall and the garden were decorated with flags and lanterns. ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, II B 1 c 3
  • Skandinaven -- October 12, 1907
    [Social]

    The Evanston literary society, Fram (Advance), had a social at Connor's Hall last Thursday, to which more than one hundred people attended. Andrew Junl, instead of Consul Gade, was the orator of the day. The latter, who was scheduled to speak, had to go to Milwaukee on business.

    The program, devoted mostly to singing and music included. Sigvard Borgen, who sang a few funny songs which were received with applause. The female members of the society served an excellent lunch. Eight new members were received. The music was by Ludw Haugan's Music Corps.

    The Evanston literary society, Fram (Advance), had a social at Connor's Hall last Thursday, to which more than one hundred people attended. Andrew Junl, instead of Consul Gade, was the ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, II B 1 a
  • Skandinaven -- January 31, 1909
    Aurora Borealis Is Twenty Years Old The First Norwegian Literary Society Celebrates

    Aurora Borealis, the first Norwegian female literary society, yesterday celebrated its twentieth anniversary with a banquet at the home of Mrs. Aagot Johnson, 666 North Hoyne Avenue. The Society has set for itself the task of spreading knowledge of Norwegian literature; it can have no more than twenty members; it was organized by Mrs. E. Pihlfeldt, Mrs. S. Mathiesen, Mrs. C. Arnet, Miss Svanoe, M. D., Miss F. Horstad, Mrs. A. Ibenfeldt, and Mrs. Selma Lunde.

    The present board of directors consists of Mrs. C. Anderson, president; Mrs. T. Holt, vice-president; Mrs. Anna Hansen, treasurer.

    At eight o'clock the members took their places about the tables...Mrs. 2Johnson had decorated the tables tastily with evergreens and with Norwegian and American flags. The ladies who assisted in the preparations were praised for their work. The president, Mrs. Carl Anderson. . . . welcomed the participants, especially the men who were the guests of honor. Mrs. Cecilie Gerner gave the following speech in honor of the day:

    "I have the impression that we have arrived at the Zenith of the day of life, from which point we have a better view of the past and the future than we had in our days of youth, that period when one is racing enthusiastically up the hillsides and mountainsides toward the ideals that one wishes to reach in order to bring home the victory. Youth is magnificent. We do not wish to deprive youth of a single hope, a solitary enjoyment. The ideals of youth are immortal, for they spring anew in every young girl and in every young man. Perhaps, also, every new generation arrives somewhat closer to the realization of these ideals than did the previous one.

    "Well, how far did we get? Did we reach our goal? Did we manage to accomplish 3that of which we were dreaming? Did we attain happiness? Perhaps on reaching one after the other of the glittering goals they appeared to us as mere mirages, fata morgana! But if through these we found the real values, if we discovered the great secret that joy has it origin within, that happiness consists in giving rather than in receiving, then we did attain happiness.

    "If life has taught us charity and understanding and sympathy for all the children of men; if it has taught us to be mild in our judgment about others and stern only in our demand on ourselves; if life has taught us to be faithful in the little things, to do that which we found for our hands to do, and do it well; if the sorrows of life have cleansed our souls' windows, as it were, then our lives have not been lived in vain.

    "It was stated at our tenth anniversary celebration that Aurora Borealis was a ten-year-old girl. On that basis she would now be a young woman of twenty--the flower opened to the sun and to life, wondering, waiting for 4the wonderful! Yet, even though we grow far past the twenty we still retain this attitude of wonder, of waiting for the wonderful; this profound, indescribable longing in every human soul never desists; I believe it grows stronger as the years go by. Some call this longing the quest for happiness; others call it the quest for God. We seek to satisfy it through love, through religion, through work, through art, through study, and it is at this point that Aurora Borealis, the literary club, becomes significant. This is the principle which has hold us together for twenty years. We have not reached far; we have not accomplished anything remarkable; we are not even of the women's suffrage movement--we are merely women who for twenty years have been able so far to rise above the everyday life so that we could gather about books. This much I know, that when we are to summarize the various individual sums in our lives, the Literary Club must be counted in. Besides, the Literary Club has had this significance: it has preserved Norway for us and within us, Norway, our Norway, its culture and its thinking."

    5

    From two of the other literary societies, Vala and Glimt came telegrams and congratulations.

    Aurora Borealis, the first Norwegian female literary society, yesterday celebrated its twentieth anniversary with a banquet at the home of Mrs. Aagot Johnson, 666 North Hoyne Avenue. The Society has ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d
  • Scandia -- June 10, 1911
    [Founder of Society Will Make Home in Norway]

    p.8.....Mrs. Pihlfeldt (nee Lehman) will sail for Norway in a few days to spend her declining years there. The Norwegian literary society "Aurora Borealis" was organized by Mrs. Pihlfeldt. Members of the society gathered for a farewell festival, in her honor, at the home of Mrs. Wm. Gerner on Wednesday, June 14th and Mrs. Gerner, on behalf of the society thanked Mrs. Pihlfeldt for her many years of service and presented her with emblem of the society in gold.

    Mrs. Pihlfeldt is a woman of unusual ability and culture and will long be remembered by our Norwegian colony for her ever faithful efforts to bring to the fore the beauty of Norway, its art, literature and traditions. Scandia wishes Mrs. Pihlfeldt pleasant future in which she may realize to the fullest the thankfulness of our people and that love and respect we have for her will ever remain.

    p.8.....Mrs. Pihlfeldt (nee Lehman) will sail for Norway in a few days to spend her declining years there. The Norwegian literary society "Aurora Borealis" was organized by Mrs. Pihlfeldt. Members ...

    Norwegian
    IV, II B 1 d
  • Scandia -- September 07, 1912
    [Norwegian Students Honor Their Alma Mater]

    Norwegian students of Chicago honored their Alma Mater, on Sept. 2nd at the club rooms of the Chicago Norwegian Club. Twenty former students of the Christiana (Norway) University gathered for a reunion banquet honoring their old school. The senior student of the group was Ivan Doe, who graduated from the C. U. 51 years ago and the baby of the group was student Dybing, a second year student, who is now in Chicago studying dentistry.

    Among the students were also Dr. Warloe and Dr. Holmboe, (who had arranged the banquet). Emil Midelfart, Dr. Doe, engineer Nygaard and editor Sundby Hausen of Scandia.

    The reunion was such a success and so pleasant that it was unanimously decided to hold a like affair on Sept. 2nd every year. Mr. Doe was chosen chairman and Dr. Doe (brother) vice chairman of the alumni association and banquet committee.

    Norwegian students of Chicago honored their Alma Mater, on Sept. 2nd at the club rooms of the Chicago Norwegian Club. Twenty former students of the Christiana (Norway) University gathered for ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 d, II A 1, IV