The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

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  • Chicago Tribune -- March 23, 1877
    Ole Bull Serenade by the Norwegians

    The gilded walls of the promenade corridor in the Grand Pacific Hotel, echoed, yesterday evening, with simple Norwegian songs. As was previously announced, a serenade was given to the famous master of the violin, Ole Bull, by a number of his admiring countrymen in this city. At about 9:30 o'clock, the "Norwegian Singing Society" grouped outside of the hotel at the Clark Street corner, and without delay struck up the familiar air "Hoja Noer". They followed this with "Wir Har Bort Lenkens Wingar". At its conclusion the vocalists were summoned into the hotel, and on arriving in the corridor they were met by Ole Bull and G. B. Carpenter, who introduced all parties. Mr. Bull shook hands with each member of the society, and after completing the rounds acknowledged the compliment shown him in a brief speech.

    2

    He said he was heartily glad to see so many friends, old and new, and wanted to tell them how thankful he was for their encouraging aid and friendship. Speaking in a low voice, yet one full of meanings, Mr. Bull referred to the history of the Norwegian race in America, which race had always been foremost in the cause of liberty. He hoped they would keep on the same honorable road and keep the flag hoisted. They were a truly united people having fewer prejudices of caste than any other nationality, and it was good for the country that it had such a people. After toiling many years against obstacles of poverty and sickness, they had at length risen to a nation so important, that no American of intelligence could overlook them.

    The Society then sang "Ossian", and soon afterward dispersed. The whole affair was informal and exceedingly pleasant.

    The gilded walls of the promenade corridor in the Grand Pacific Hotel, echoed, yesterday evening, with simple Norwegian songs. As was previously announced, a serenade was given to the famous ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, II B 1 a
  • Scandia -- March 24, 1900
    The Norwegian Glee Club

    The Norwegian Glee Club gave a Folk Concert at Scandia Hall last Tuesday.

    The stage was decorated as a battle-field of the Boer war. The scenery was done by the artist John Larsen.

    The program was as follows:

    Part One

    1. Selections from "The Fortune Teller" Victor Herbert

    Orchestra.

    2. a) "Mit Faderland" Conradi
    b) "Solnedgang" [Sunset] ABT

    The Norwegian Glee Club

    3. "Then You'll Remember Me" Balfe

    Trombone Solo by A. F. Wenzel

    2
    4. "The Bjornborgar March"

    The North Star Singing Club

    5. German Selection Andauer

    Orchestra.

    6. "Hark! The Trumpet Calleth" Buck Amphion Singing Club Ten-minute intermission

    Part Two

    1. Potpourri of Norwegian Melodies Alfred Paulsen

    Orchestra.

    2. "I Brollops Gaarden" Soderman

    North Star Singing Club.

    3. "The Anchor" Watson

    Tenor Solo by Adolph Gill.

    3
    4. "My Old Kentucky Home" Fischer (sic) Concert Solo and Orchestra
    5. "Altar of Nuth" Mohr Amphion Singing Club and Orchestra
    6. a) "To My Country", Op. 9 Karl Kromer.
    b) The Boer National Hymn The Norwegian Glee Club

    The Norwegian Glee Club gave a Folk Concert at Scandia Hall last Tuesday. The stage was decorated as a battle-field of the Boer war. The scenery was done by the ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Scandia -- March 31, 1900
    Scandinavian Concert

    Math Pedersen's concert last night was one of the most successful given in Chicago in years. The thirty-piece orchestra, the Viking Marine Band, Miss Nora Olsen, alto, George Bass, violinist, E. Gnepper, trombonist, and the Chicago Trombone Quartet participated.

    The program was as follows:

    Part One

    1. "Leif Ericson March" Math Pedersen

    Orchestra

    2. "Swedish Wedding March" Soderman

    Orchestra

    3. "Drommebilleder" Lumby

    Orchestra

    2
    4. "Fackeltanz" Meyerbeer

    Orchestra

    5. Fantasia, "Remembrance of Norway" Math Pedersen (Solo for Cornet with Orchestra Accompaniment) Math Pedersen

    Part Two

    6. "United States Military March" Math Pedersen Viking Marine Band
    7. Fantasia, "In the Viking Domain" Max Von Lentz (Introducing for the first time Huldre, Kvae, Bor Jeg, Hallins, Andante, Lur Solo, Saeterjentens Sondag; Sigrid, Listen to Me; Sleep in Peace, Norway's Best, Reveille.)

    Viking Band

    8. "The Jolly Musicians" Muscat Viking Marine Band
    3
    9. Address on music by Olav Bohmer.
    10. "Synnoves Song" Kjerulf

    Miss Nora Olsen

    11. Concerto: Andante, Allegro, Vivace Mendelssohn

    Violin solo by George Bass

    12. "In the Deep Cellar" Kowalski E. Gnepper, Trombonist, and Brass Quartet
    13. "Pilgrims' Chorus," from "Tannhaeuser" Wagner Chicago Trombone Quartet
    14. "The Cornet Virtuoso" M. Pedersen Math Pedersen and Orchestra
    15. "Peer Gynt Suite No. 1" Edvard Grieg
    a) "Morning"
    b) "Anitra's Dance"
    c) "Aase's Death"
    d) "In the Dovre-Gubbes Hall"
    4
    16. "American Overture" Tobani (Ending with "The Star-Spangled Banner") Orchestra and Viking Marine Band

    Math Pedersen's concert last night was one of the most successful given in Chicago in years. The thirty-piece orchestra, the Viking Marine Band, Miss Nora Olsen, alto, George Bass, violinist, ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Skandinaven -- April 24, 1900
    Mathew Pedersen's Concert

    Mathew Pedersen's jubilee concert at Schoenhofen's Hall last Sunday evening was well attended and a source of musical enjoyment far above the ordinary.

    The first number on the program, "Leif Erikson's March" written by Mathew Pedersen, and presented by an orchestra of thirty men, aroused enthusiasm; it was followed by Soderman's eternal "Swedish Wedding March"; Lumby's "Dream Phantasies"; G. Meyerbeer's "Candle Dance". The public applauded each of these numbers, and during the presentation of the next piece, "Memories from Norway," the public did not wait with its applause until the numbers had been played, but lively applause was heard while the playing went on. This, by the way, should not be done, since the applause will drown the less strenuous of the tones from the instruments. The "Memories from Norway" had been arranged by Mr. Pedersen and he himself played the cornet solo.....Mr. Pedersen plays the cornet with masterly power. Under the leadership of Mr. Pedersen, the Viking Marine Band 2played "United States Military March"; the difficult phantasies of Norwegian folk melodies were played by the band in a manner that gave clear evidence of the splendid progress made by this young band under its able director.

    Miss Eleonora Olsen sang "Synove's Song" with beautiful effect, and, being recalled again and again, she sang as an encore "Sigrid's Song" from "To the Saeter".

    The Norwegian Glee Club rendered with fine effect a serenade by O. W. Rechter under the direction of Mr. John Dahl.

    A young violinist, George Bass, gave a violin solo from Mendelssohn. He showed ability as a player indicating that he may become a great violinist. The Chicago Trombone Quartet played Wagner's "Pilgrims' Chorus" from "Tannhaeuser". The presentation received much applause.

    As the final number, the orchestra played Edward Grieg's "Peer Gynt Suite, 3No. 1," and this formed a worthy conclusion to the very successful concert.

    At the beginning of part two of the concert, Mr. Olav Boehmer gave a poetic speech on the theme "Music," and ended by extending his thanks to Mr. Mathew Pedersen for his services to music in Chicago during the past twenty years.

    Mathew Pedersen's jubilee concert at Schoenhofen's Hall last Sunday evening was well attended and a source of musical enjoyment far above the ordinary. The first number on the program, "Leif ...

    Norwegian
    II B 1 a, II A 3 b, IV
  • Skandinaven -- May 13, 1900
    Hans Christian Verner Noted American Composer Born in Skien, Norway

    As a composer of popular songs and piano music, few musicians have won greater acclaim than Hans Christian Verner, a Chicago Norwegian.

    Mr. Verner came with his parents to Chicago from Skien, Norway, when he was a little boy. His father, Mr. Verner, Sr., who was engaged in the jewelry business on Milwaukee Avenue about twenty-five years ago, can still be remembered by many of the oldsters among the readers of the Skandinaven.

    The older Mr. Verner died when the future composer was only three year old. Mrs. Verner had died some time previously, and the boy was brought up by one of his aunts.

    At a very early age Hans Christian Verner began to show great aptitude both as musician and composer, but he did not win renown till lately. His first great 2success was the song "Won't you be my Sweetheart," which appeared in 1894 and at once won the approval of the public and to such an extent that 150,000 copies of the song were sold. Next came "Pride of the Ball," of which 175,000 copies were sold. Both of these songs.....belong to the type of compositions which not merely are of interest at the moment but also retain their popularity among the people.

    To list even a small number of Mr. Verner's compositions would take more space than we can spare. Several of his songs are known also in Germany and in Norway. A part of his music has been published by Sheard & Company, London. The noted music critic Amy Leslie, in one of her reviews, says: "Mr. H. C. Verner has recently composed two brilliant pieces for the piano, 'The Jolly Bachelors' and 'Butterfly Wooing'. He is one of Chicago's most promising composers and at present is working on an opera, several songs of which give evidence of talent of first rank."

    Also in the field of church music, Mr. Verner has won considerable renown. His 3"Beautiful Visions" has won the hearts of all from Maine to California, according to the Musical Courier of New York.

    Although Mr. Verner has lived practically all his life in the United States, he considers himself a Norwegian and is interested in everything pertaining to the land of his birth. In his home there is to be found a collection of paintings from Norway, wood carvings from Norway, etc., all of which he proudly shows to his American friends.

    Mr. Verner also has composed "Viking March" and the song "Little Inga Olson," which has won strong acclaim. In addition, Mr. Verner has set to music the poems (by Eugene Field) "The Night Wind" and "Wynken, Blynken, and Nod". Both of these compositions had a very large sale, and one half of the royalties went to the family of the late poet.

    A large number of Mr. Verner's compositions have been published under the pseudonyms of Carl Henschel and H. V. Monroe.....

    4

    Most of the compositions by Mr. Verner have been published by S. Brainard's Sons Publishing Company, Chicago and New York.

    In addition to being a composer, Mr. Verner is an artist of no mean ability......His income from royalties is very large.

    As a composer of popular songs and piano music, few musicians have won greater acclaim than Hans Christian Verner, a Chicago Norwegian. Mr. Verner came with his parents to Chicago ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Skandinaven -- May 20, 1900
    The Seventeenth of May Festival by Olaf E. Ray [Chairman of the Committee on Arrangements]

    The following letter came to me through the mails:

    "To the Committee on Arrangements, May 17.

    "We are pleased to learn that the attendance was small at the Seventeenth of May festival held at the Auditorium; it was to be expected. The more educated and music-loving Chicago public do not go out into the rain in order to listen to village talents and scab musicians, who think that anything will be accepted by the public if only the title of professor is hung before the name of the performer.

    "It has always been the case here in Chicago that when the Norwegians plan some undertaking, certain self-chosen semicultured leaders find their way to the front--leaders who are only seeking to get their own names advertised while 2they do not consider the public at all.

    Your admiring

    Criticus."

    It is unfortunate that "Criticus" does not give his name. There may be a valid reason for this: his letter is decorated with twenty-one misspellings, [and it is] just as well not to sign such evidence of ignorance.

    The first part of the letter seems to be aimed at Mr. Emil Bjorn, in charge of the singing and of the orchestra at the Auditorium. If our Committee had known in advance how badly Mr. M. Pedersen felt about competing with Mr. Emil Bjorn for the leadership of the orchestra at the Auditorium, it may be that his sensibilities might have been considered, so that he might have been engaged for the job. In such a case one could have counted on Mr. Bjorn to have given his best assistance anyhow.

    As Mr. M. Pedersen was not selected to direct the orchestra at the Auditorium, 3he decided to do some directing anyway, and so he, with the assistance of Mr. C. A. Strand, started an "opposition" celebration of the day at the Scandia Hall.

    The fact that Mr. Bjorn is a member of another musical union than the one to which Mr. Pedersen belongs, does not justify anybody in calling the former a "scab," since it is a debatable question which of the two organizations is the more orthodox one. In choosing Mr. Bjorn as director of the musical part of the Auditorium festival, the Committee on Arrangements took the relative ability of the two men into consideration, without in anyway depreciating Mr. Pedersen's standing. Of course, there could be no question of engaging more than one music director.

    The fact that the attendance at the Auditorium was scant,was of course due to a number of diverse causes. For one thing, this was the third time in one year that the Norwegian public had been called on to go downtown to the Auditorium in connection with national festive occasions. Our Committee had a premonition that the choice of the Auditorium for the May 17 festival this 4year was unfortunate, but we could do nothing about it, since the place had been rented for the purpose one year in advance, and the Norwegian National Association did not want to go back on its word and lease.

    Then the weather turned bad--cold and wet--and many decided to remain at home under the circumstances.

    The festival at Scandia Hall was intended to draw the people away from the Auditorium. Some people went to Scandia; some kept away from both places, bewildered by the situation.

    The Committee on Arrangements for the Norwegian National Association's Seventeenth of May festival this year, took the standpoint that the day is an exclusively Norwegian holiday, and for this reason it decided to offer a straight Norwegian program. No political freaks of foreign origin were on the program; but this fact hardly contributed to the lack of a larger audience.

    5

    For several months a large number of Norwegian craftsmen in Chicago have been on strike, and at present they lack the means required for a celebration; this fact kept many away from the Auditorium.

    The Committee on Arrangements for the Norwegian National Association's Seventeenth of May festival this year, is convinced that the various societies of which the Association is composed did everything in their power to promote the success of the festival. The singers practiced several times and added to their repertoire new Norwegian songs which had a strong appeal to the Norwegian patriotic sentiment. The Turner Society and the Athletic Club Sleipner gave good account of their art on the stage. Mr. W. C. Thorp presented, at considerable expense to himself, excellent slides of Norwegian landscapes. The speakers and our splendid young Norwegian violinist came from far off, at their own expense, to tie the bond of friendship between Norwegians here and those living farther west. Miss Ragnhild Johnson gave of her best in beautiful songs for the day, and if Mr. Criticus had striven to bring about unity within our circle, rather than to permit himself to be carried away by his enthusiasm 6for our lack of talent and co-operation, then he might have had more authority in appearing among his compatriots, and would not have needed his incognito shield when writing.

    The following letter came to me through the mails: "To the Committee on Arrangements, May 17. "We are pleased to learn that the attendance was small at the Seventeenth of ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, II B 1 c 3, I D 2 a 2, II A 3 b, II B 1 a, I C, IV
  • Skandinaven -- May 27, 1900
    [The May Seventeenth Quarel] Mr. M. Pedersen Did Not Write the "Criticus'" Letter by M. Pedersen

    In the Skandinaven of May 20, Mr. Olav Ray, on behalf of the Committee on Arrangements for the festival at the Auditorium, practically accuses me of having sent him by mail an anonymous letter, which he publishes. I beg to inform Mr. Ray that I am not mean, and that I did not at all write the kind of letter published by him. There is no point in attempting to create ill feeling between Mr. [Emil] Bjorn and myself. If Mr. Ray should become a member of some committee on arrangements for some future festival, I hope that he will not repeat his attempt to disturb the friendly feeling between Mr. Bjorn and myself or to try to take a hand in the question of musical competition or music unions.

    If the Norwegian National Association and its Committee on Arrangements considered the seventeenth of May as an exclusively Norwegian day, other 2Norwegians may well do the same, as we are at liberty to celebrate the day wherever we want to and in our own manner. Finally, let me extend a piece of advice to Mr. Olav Ray: Do not try to exclude the Norwegian musicians on a day like this; do not try to make the Norwegian people travel far away to a downtown hall. Give us a chance to earn a dollar on the affairs of the day, and you will find greater co-operation.

    In the Skandinaven of May 20, Mr. Olav Ray, on behalf of the Committee on Arrangements for the festival at the Auditorium, practically accuses me of having sent him by ...

    Norwegian
    III B 3 a, I D 2 a 2, II A 3 b, III B 2, IV
  • Skandinaven -- July 21, 1900
    "Ye Artists" Emil Bjorn's New Composition Appears

    Mr. Emil Bjorn's latest composition, "Ye Artists' March", published by the S. Brainard Sons' Company, has just appeared. The march was first played by Mr. Bjorn's orchestra at the Auditorium on the occasion of the Seventeenth of May festival, and all the musicians present spoke in high praise of the composition. Several of them made arrangements to secure the use of the piece for various "Summer Gardens". At present the new composition is being played at Bismark Garden, Germania, Kinsley's, the Great Northern Theater, Humboldt Park House, and at other places.

    Now the composition has been published for piano. Mr. Bjorn himself has drawn the title page, a "funny poster" in many colors, showing "Ye Artists" marching off with full pack for a tour of sketching.

    Mr. Bjorn is very popular both among his American colleagues and among his countrymen, and as a consequence his piece has had a large sale. The march is light, merry, and appealing.....

    Mr. Emil Bjorn's latest composition, "Ye Artists' March", published by the S. Brainard Sons' Company, has just appeared. The march was first played by Mr. Bjorn's orchestra at the Auditorium ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Skandinaven -- November 27, 1900
    Helga Larsen Is Becoming Famous Sings Folk Songs

    Helga Larsen is a young soprano who at present is traveling in the eastern states on a concert tour. Less than two years ago she was working as a maid in a household on the South Side of Chicago. At that time she had just arrived from Norway, and her knowledge of English was very limited. However, she had had some training in music.

    As Miss Larsen began to improve her English, the woman for whom she worked noticed that she was careful in her choice of words.....She never spoke of her homeland or of her activities there; it was known that she had acquaintances in Chicago, but she never mentioned them.

    One spring day while working....Miss Larsen began to sing....one of the Norwegian folk songs. Her employer heard her from below....and was utterly 2surprised at the sound of the soft melodious voice....The following day she asked Miss Larsen to sing, and the girl, sitting down at the piano, sang one of her folk songs. After singing several numbers the members of the family for whom she was working decided to find a way for the talented girl to secure the kind of position for which her talent and knowledge qualified her. The lady of the house spoke of the girl's voice to Mrs. Crosby Adams, a well-known music teacher. Mrs. Adams became interested, and as she was living near by she found it easy to get a chance for a conversation with the girl. To her surprise she learned that Miss Larsen not only was well acquainted with the music of Grieg and Kjerulf, but also with that of most of the world's greatest composers.

    ....Mrs. Crosby Adams offered to give the girl more advanced instruction in music; she found an easier job for Miss Larsen so that she could find time for practice, and in addition she made arrangements with Miss Elizabeth Harding, a singing teacher, for voice training. It did not take long for Miss Larsen's voice to develop.

    3

    Mrs. Crosby Adams is very proud of this pupil of hers. To a reporter for the Skandinaven she said:

    "Miss Larsen possesses an unusually sympathetic voice, and she sings both in Norwegian and in French with excellent diction. At present she is traveling in the eastern states as a member of a concert group, and everywhere she has received favorable criticism....She will return to Chicago within a week."...

    Helga Larsen is a young soprano who at present is traveling in the eastern states on a concert tour. Less than two years ago she was working as a maid ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, IV
  • Scandia -- July 17, 1901
    Humboldt Park Concerts

    The new Studebaker Opera Orchestra, under the direction of Anton Pedersen, gave the following programs yesterday in Humboldt Park:

    Afternoon Concert

    1. March--"The Cycle Queen" Brooke
    2. Waltz [Anonymous]
    3. Selection--"Coville's Bells" Waldteufel
    4. "Guard Mount" Eulenberg
    5. "Hungarian Fantasia Tobani
    6. Overture to "William Tell" Rossini
    7. March--"Stars and Stripes Forever" Sousa
    8. Idyl--"The Forge in the Forest" Michaelis
    9. Largo (with Violin Obbligats) Handel
    10. Hunting Scene Bucalossi
    2
    11. Peer Gynt Suite Number One Grieg
    a) Morgen [Morning]
    b) Aases Dod [The Death of Aase]
    c) Anitra's Dance
    d) I Dovregubbens Hal
    12. Waltz--"A Summer Evening" Waldteufel
    13. "The Mosquito Parade" Whitney
    14. "Gala City March" Weldon

    Evening Concert

    1. March--"The Blue and the Gray" Chattaway
    2. Hungarian Dance [Anonymous]
    3. "Old-fashioned Air" G. Marie
    4. Selections from the "Mikado" Sullivan
    5. March--"Seventh Army Corps" Weldon
    3
    6. Selections from the "Bohemian Girl" Balfe
    7. The Darkies' Jubilee Turner
    8. Waltz--"Souvenir de Baden" Bosquet
    9. "A Country Character" Von Tilzer
    10. Violin Solo Selected

    Mr. Harry Dimond

    11. Potpourri of Norwegian Melodies Sperati
    12. "Flower Song" Tobani
    13. The Tale of the Kangaroo" Luders
    14. "Galop" Strauss

    We have seldom listened to a program so long and so highly varied. Scandinavians are exceptionally fond of long programs, composed almost entirely of classical music.

    Director Anton Pedersen will always see to it that the program is broad, and 4that all nations are represented.

    The new Studebaker Opera Orchestra, under the direction of Anton Pedersen, gave the following programs yesterday in Humboldt Park: Afternoon Concert <table> <tr> <td>1. March--"The Cycle Queen"</td> <td>Brooke</td> </tr> <tr> ...

    Norwegian
    II A 3 b, IV