The Chicago Foreign Language Press Survey was published in 1942 by the Chicago Public Library Omnibus Project of the Works Progress Administration of Illinois. The purpose of the project was to translate and classify selected news articles that appeared in the foreign language press from 1855 to 1938. The project consists of 120,000 typewritten pages translated from newspapers of 22 different foreign language communities of Chicago.

Read more about this historic project.

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  • Skandinaven -- March 18, 1872
    Jens Olsen (Kaasa)

    Nominated as candidate for the office of City Collector, Jens Olsen, needs no recommendation from us. It is far more necessary and important to urge his countrymen to work for his election. We are not now going to decry the regrettable fact that the Scandinanians as a whole take such a halfhearted, passive attitude in the political life of the city. But we do consider it proper at this time to remind them of their political duty as citizens on election day; and also to remind them that if they neglect to cast their vote for him, Jens Olsen's excellent chances for election may be ruined.

    They should not rest assured that the candidate's fine qualities are in themselves sufficient to lead him to victory. The Norwegian Republicans who are so numerous in Chicago ought to make themselves more felt in the city politics. To be content with one representative (H. L. Hertz) in the city convention is almost ridiculous. Such modesty is entirely out of place in politics.

    Nominated as candidate for the office of City Collector, Jens Olsen, needs no recommendation from us. It is far more necessary and important to urge his countrymen to work for ...

    Norwegian
    I F 1, I F 5, IV
  • Skandinaven -- March 18, 1879
    [Olsen to Run for Collector]

    Mr. Jens Olsen (Kaasa) has been nominated as candidate for the office of city collector by the West Side Town Convention. We will not dwell here on the many good qualities of this candidate. His accomplishments are well known, and his honesty and ability have won for him the esteem of all his fellow citizens.

    Mr. Jens Olsen (Kaasa) has been nominated as candidate for the office of city collector by the West Side Town Convention. We will not dwell here on the many good ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, IV
  • Skandinaven -- January 05, 1889
    Why Not?

    Why would it not be proper and entirely fitting if the presidential electors of Minnesota selected our worthy friend, the Hon. Mons Grinager, as their representative to convey the "sacred urn" of their ballots to the national capitol? This is merely a suggestion on our part. The Skandinaven has no intention of dictating to the electors of Minnesota, or anyone else, what they should do, but we have been accustomed to associate the name of Captain Grinager with what is honorable and patriotic and of good repute in Minnesota politics. We believe that the people of the state generally agree with us in that view. If we are not misinformed as to his character since the time he fought gallantly in the defense of the Union to the present time, he has proved himself such a citizen as we are endeavoring to make of all our Scandinavian countrymen. A merited compliment to him would be a compliment to the nationality, and a distinct approval of honest efforts for becoming true American citizens. There probably was no nationality in Minnesota that unanimously supported the Republican ticket more than the Scandinavian. It would certainly not be unfitting, therefore, if one of that race should convey the decision of the state to the country at large.

    Why would it not be proper and entirely fitting if the presidential electors of Minnesota selected our worthy friend, the Hon. Mons Grinager, as their representative to convey the "sacred ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, I C
  • Skandinaven -- July 13, 1890
    Death of Andrew Johnson

    Andrew Johnson, one of the Norwegian colony's beloved veterans, died at his home, 151 North Halsted Street, last Friday.

    Mr. Johnson was one of Chicago's oldest pioneers, and the oldest member of the Old Settlers Society here in Chicago. He remembers Chicago when it was but a small village, when cattle grazed on the lots that are now occupied by some of the city's largest buildings. He remembers the Prairie Schooners that sailed through Chicago to the frontiers beyond, and the Indians that roamed the prairies about the city.

    His name is found engraved on a stone tablet in the old Courthouse. He grew with the city, step by step, when the population was but a handful. Today, there are 1,100,000 inhabitants.

    Mr. Johnson was born in Voss, Norway, in 1824. He came to Chicago in 1837.

    2

    He lived for many years with Major Kinzie, also an old pioneer. He worked for the Butler and Norton Lumber Company at Lake Street and the River. A little later, he started a Lumber Yard for himself on Canal Street.

    From 1860-66, he was a member of the old Board of Supervisors, later called County Commissioners, then president of the County Board, and at the same time president of the County School Commission.

    The great fire of 1871 was a calamity for him. He sustained a loss of $60,000, but he began again, and now at his death, he was one of the city's wealthiest men.

    He used to tell interesting episodes of his life. He told over and over again the story of the only two Norwegian families living here when he came, and there were but few others. He tells of the old ferry which sailed across the Chicago river, of the first bridge, the muddy streets, churned daily by the wheels of long caravans of Prairie Schooners, of the fights with the Indians and the tough element, the gamblers, the prostitutes, and the highwaymen. All this was doubly interesting because it was told by an eyewitness.

    Andrew Johnson, one of the Norwegian colony's beloved veterans, died at his home, 151 North Halsted Street, last Friday. Mr. Johnson was one of Chicago's oldest pioneers, and the oldest ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, II A 2, IV
  • Chicago Tribune -- July 13, 1890
    A. B. Johnson, Old Timer

    A. B. Johnson, one of Chicago's pioneers, died at his home, 151 North Halsted Street, from a paralytic stroke when he suffered about three weeks ago. He came to Chicago in 1837 from Norway being then 14 years old. He was the oldest Norwegian settler. Her worked for Mayor Kinzie and the Butler & Morton Lumber Company, then started in the lumber business himself on North Canal Street and accumulated a competency but was burned in the great fire.

    He was a member of the Old Country Board of Supervisors from 1860 to 1866, and was chairman of the Finance Committee for two years. After the fire he was Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners and was prominent in the work of assistance to sufferers from the fire. He was elected to office generally on a peoples' ticket on account of his well-known honesty, He leaves a widow, four sons, and two daughters. The funeral will take place Monday under the rites of the Episcopal Church, of which Mr. Johnson was a devout member.

    A. B. Johnson, one of Chicago's pioneers, died at his home, 151 North Halsted Street, from a paralytic stroke when he suffered about three weeks ago. He came to Chicago ...

    Norwegian
    IV, I F 5
  • Skandinaven -- January 31, 1891
    A Man for Mayor

    Above everything else, the great City of Chicago needs a real mayor. Whatever our city may do in the next two years by way of preparation for the World's Fair; whatever adornments this "Lady of the Lake" may wish to put on in order to receive and entertain the nations of the world properly, as her guests, Chicago will be molded by the judgment and guided by the hand of its chief magistrate. Some fair officials are to be chosen. There never was a greater opportunity for the city and for the mayor, and there never was a greater peril in a false move. The exigency is with us and must be met.

    But while consideration of this special exigency may be a good leverage for lifting the burden of misgovernment under which we are groaning and which is arousing the citizens to a new sense of responsibility, it is by no means the only or the sole reason for prompt and decisive action. Every consideration of honor and decency, every desire for the moral and physical well-being of the masses of our vast and growing population, as 2well as a due appreciation of the influence of this great metropolis upon the life of the whole interior of our country politically, socially and industrially, should prompt all citizens to a united effort in rising to the height of our opportunity and responsibility.

    The whole world knows that misgovernment of our cities is the blight and blemish attached to American institutions. We have finally become conscious of it ourselves, for it is daily confessed by our press and periodicals, by our best informed and most thoughtful men. This is a good omen, presaging eventual action. The serious and sober elements will not tolerate this great peril and shame to be treated as a subject for raillery and jest. A remedy must be found and applied. And why should it not be done now? Why should not Chicago add this also to her glory? In her youth and vigor it should have crushed the hundred-headed Hydra of municipal misgovernment and destroyed it before it had poisoned her vitals. Why should not Chicago, this "Queen of the Lakes," in grateful recognition of the honor that has been conferred upon her, and in receiving the crown which the entire country has placed upon her brow, herself add this central jewel to the crown by 3purging herself of her filth and setting a worthy example of municipal reform? Could any aim be loftier? Can any action, any effort be more certain of a reward?

    The task is too great to be achieved at a single stroke, but it can be begun at once. A good beginning is half of the whole undertaking, but a piecemeal, timid beginning is an invitation to failure. This is not the way Chicago is wont to do things in business and industrial undertakings. Why should it not prove itself worthy of its character and reputation in the more essential concern of municipal regeneration as well?

    This is not the field for party politics; Republican, Democratic, Mugwump, Prohibitionist and Socialist--every shade of political faith--is confessedly of one opinion in this most essential matter. They have been so for some time, but when the moment for decisive action arrives, the reformers timidly fold their hands, and the grinding, fatal movements of the political machine are heard in every camp. Shall this be repeated in the year 1891? If not, how must it be avoided?

    4

    It should be avoided by the simple process of choosing a [suitable] man for mayor. He should be a man, not simply a cog in the gearing of a political machine. Chicago can furnish a regiment of such men, who are not representative of the worse, but of the better elements. [We need]a man who cannot afford to sell himself for money or notoriety to a combination of men whose character and occupation is a source of filth; a man who has something to lose when he allies himself with immoral elements and becomes the tool of gamblers and brothel owners. A man, whose strength of purpose and decision of character, when tested, will find support in the sympathy and co-operation of high-minded citizens. This is the beginning and the all essential first step in the upgrade movement. It ought not to be very difficult. It is not necessary to search the back alleys with a lantern for such a man. It is not necessary that his fingers should be covered with the dirt of the workshop or that he should wear silk stockings. Outward appearance, which is often thought necessary to win certain classes of voters, may safely be placed in the background. The simple question to be asked is: Is he a man? Is he a man with permanent interests, who is devoted to the city? Is he a man whose 5capacity for affairs has been tested? Finally, is he a man who cannot afford to desert the standard of good morals and clean goverment, who will reflect credit upon the best character and intelligence of the community and, who, two years hence, can be re-elected and enter the period of the World's Columbian Exposition with experience and with assurance?

    We think that such a man, no matter what his creed is, politically or religiously, will be supported by the majority of our citizens; a majority, with whose support it is safe for such a man to meet any emergency.

    We will not attempt to name the man, but, for the sake of illustration, we will name some men, whom we think, popular judgment will recognize as answering to our postulates. Would not the best interests of the city be safe while the reins of government are in the hands of such men among the Republicans as: John M. Smyth, T. W. Reck, Victor F. Lawson, a Dane, or S. E. Gross, [(the largest real estate and tax shark in the '80's and '90's) -Translator's note]; and among Democrats: E. M. Phelps, John R. Walsh, William D. Kerfoot, A. H. Revell, E. S. Dreier, Max Henius, the latter two 6being of Danish descent.

    The election of aldermen must be placed on the same basis. Reform is as imperative in this field as it is in the executive [branch].

    Let the city take such a step now, with earnestness and unwavering purpose, and it will have fulfilled that condition of success which is necessary in order to pluck the fruit the moment it is ripe. The political bosses might be left at the parting of the ways and the McDonalds and Sullivans, or whatever their names may be, would find themselves out of a job. But the honest citizens would breathe freely again and take heart. Moreover, our streets, which are slippery with mud and reeking with nauseating odors from the business center to every corner would be cleaned. The moral filth, too, would be prevented from flouting itself with brazen effrontery in our thoroughfares. When our million visitors leave us, after the great fair, they will retain pleasant memories instead of disgust and regret. It cannot be repeated too often that correct views on the tariff and silver 7legislation will not restrain the saloon, overturn gambling tables, close the brothels, clean our streets or purify our atmosphere. It is also safe to assume that the foreign elements in our population will offer their support in such a movement in a way that will cheer the hearts of all good citizens. But the movement must be led and led by men of courage and with spirit of self-sacrifice and patriotism.

    Above everything else, the great City of Chicago needs a real mayor. Whatever our city may do in the next two years by way of preparation for the World's Fair; ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, I F 1, I F 2, I F 3, I F 4, I C, I M, IV
  • Skandinaven -- October 02, 1891
    Cook County Republican Convention

    The following Scandinavians were elected to the Republican Cook County Convention:

    N. B. Miller (Dane), Oscar Carson (Swede), Charles Swanson (Swede), William Thomsen (Dane), Charles I. Swanson (Swede), George Andersen (Dane), H. L. Thompsen (Dane), H. N. Nielsen (Dane), Henry L. Hertz (Dane), George Christiansen (Dane), A. N. Lange (Dane), John P. Johnsen (Dane), James Skallerup (Dane), Peter Olsen (Dane), Nils Juul (Dane), Louis Undem (Norwegian), Frederick Ericson (Swede), N. M. Deal (Norwegian), John Adrianson (Norwegian), Jacob Miller (Dane), Conrad Eimsted (Norwegian), Alfred Petersen (Dane), John A. Linn (Norwegian), E. I. Olsen (Dane), Peter Larson (Norwegian), Samuel E. Ericksen (Norwegian), Gus Peterson (Norwegian), T. H. Tiedeman (Dane), R. W. Patterson (Swede), William S. Hussander (Norwegian), L. Liljenstrom (Swede), P. F. Frickow (Dane), and C. Helander (Norwegian).

    The following Scandinavians were elected to the Republican Cook County Convention: N. B. Miller (Dane), Oscar Carson (Swede), Charles Swanson (Swede), William Thomsen (Dane), Charles I. Swanson (Swede), George Andersen ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, IV
  • Skandinaven -- October 03, 1891
    Republican Central Committee Members

    The following well-known Scandinavians were elected to the Republican Central Committee: O. F. Seversen (Norwegian), Conrad Wideman (Norwegian), John R. Petersen (Dane), Fredrik Peter Miller (Dane), John R. Petersen (Dane), and Albert Andersen (Dane).

    The following well-known Scandinavians were elected to the Republican Central Committee: O. F. Seversen (Norwegian), Conrad Wideman (Norwegian), John R. Petersen (Dane), Fredrik Peter Miller (Dane), John R. Petersen (Dane), ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, IV
  • Skandinaven -- June 27, 1892
    Rotation in Office (Editorial)

    There is a fearful amount of bad legislation in this country, and the chief source of this evil is to be found in the application of the principle of rotation in the legislative positions. Lawmaking is a subtle science and a fine art, the most difficult task of all in the complex and complicated process of government. The most finished product of modern civilization is a wise and successful lawmaker. He is, or ought to be, the skilled workman of politics "par excellence".

    This delicate function we entrust--to our wisest and best men? Far from it! The majority of the men who make our laws are petty, local politicians whose ambitions must be satisfied in some way, but who do not possess influence enough to obtain any of the offices that "pay". This ignorant crowd is then 2let loose upon society and invested with power to tinker with institutions and principles, and to embody their whims and vagaries in statutes which the people are compelled to obey, if such mongrel laws are not so completely meaningless that their enforcement cannot be attempted seriously. Bad legislation is the main curse of all modern democracies, as it must be as long as the power of lawmaking is exercised by the political roustabouts of society, by a set of men whose ignorance is only matched by their monumental lack of experience. This applies with especial force to our state legislation; but as everybody knows, the lower house of Congress also contains a large percentage of men who are entirely unfit for their duties, and who serve their constituents and their country best by doing nothing at all except to draw their salaries.

    Instead of letting legislative offices go 'round, and thus placing the power of legislation in the hands of inexperienced and incompetent men, good men should be returned as long as they are willing to serve, or at least so long 3as the other party is willing to let them serve. It is old heads and experienced hands rather than new blood which are needed more than anything else in our legislative halls. The shifting fortunes of parties result in a more than sufficient supply of the new blood that is needed. But when a man has reached the point where he can become really useful as legislator, by reason of acquired experience and familiarity with the work, he is put under the thumbscrews of the principle of rotation in office, and told to give way to a new and untried man.

    N. P. Haugen is a case in point. He has served the same district for three consecutive terms in Congress, and is understood to be willing to accept the Congressional nomination this fall in his new district which is made up largely of counties forming the old eighth district. Technically considered, his nomination would not be a renomination; but the people are requested to look at the substance of the thing, and to send some other man, for the 4very reason that Haugen has served long enough to acquire thorough familiarity with Congressional routine and the work of national lawmaking. It is possible, at least it is to be hoped, that the good sense of the people will assert itself in this instance. Haugen's record as a member of the lower house is one of brilliant, and solid ability. In the great battle with the southern brigadiers, he has stood firm as a rock against which the waves of fury dash in vain. His contributions to the great tariff discussions in the House rank with the best efforts of the ablest members of the House. He possesses what may be termed a "legislative temper" in an eminent degree, and is endowed with all the essential qualities of a useful and wise lawmaker--wide information, a studious mind, native conservatism, well-grounded convictions upon public questions, and a liberal supply of practical common sense.

    There is a fearful amount of bad legislation in this country, and the chief source of this evil is to be found in the application of the principle of rotation ...

    Norwegian
    I F 5, I F 6, I E, I J, IV
  • Skandinaven -- November 09, 1892
    Elections

    Georg Edmanson was elected president of the County Board; P. B. Nelson, to Congress and J. J. Dahlman, State Board of Equalization.

    Georg Edmanson was elected president of the County Board; P. B. Nelson, to Congress and J. J. Dahlman, State Board of Equalization.

    Norwegian
    I F 5, IV